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Recycled Organic Living Soil (ROLS) and No Till Thread

Discussion in 'Organics' started by headtreep, Mar 21, 2013.

  1.  
    keepsake

    keepsake Well-Known Member

    Some of the leaf tips around the nodes are yellow... what's causing that?
    I ask because mine are doing the same.
    Soil may be a little too hot or what?
     
  2.  
    Bed Wetter

    Bed Wetter Member

    What’s the consensus on red brick shards for aeration?

    On the east coast it’s difficult to find aeration materials that make sense for a yard of soil. Old/OG red brick is a material that I have access to that may work. the brick is the remains of my old chimney.

    It would be crushed,screened, and rinsed by myself.
    The second tier of aeration may be biochar and leaf mould, a smaller percentage of pea gravel perhaps. I’ll save the rice hulls for the worms.



    I can alway ship BAS here but If I don’t have to drop $1,500 on a yard of soil, I won’t.
     
    calliandra likes this.
  3.  
    Mexican bagseeder

    Mexican bagseeder Member

    So today I found webs on my buds but when I looked closer they belonged to a tiny blue spider with yellow spots on its back. Their are about 4 spiders all together. They definitely are not mites they are to big. Will these eat spider mites... I think they will because they are smaller than lady bugs. Any input?
     
  4.  
    dubekoms

    dubekoms Well-Known Member

    Rice hulls are super cheap, $10 for 7 cf
     
  5.  
    hillbill

    hillbill Well-Known Member

    If it's a spider it’s a predator but may or may not eat mites. It won't eat your plant.
     
  6.  
    Bed Wetter

    Bed Wetter Member

    I hear you but will they last in rols with worms? I was under the impression I would have to add more aeration once they eventually breakdown.

    I can spring for home store red lava rock but I’d still have to toil away for a couple days with a hammer and a quiver of joints.

    Brick might not be the best choice but just putting it out there because they are free and as local as it gets for me.
     
    calliandra likes this.
  7.  
    Fastslappy

    Fastslappy Well-Known Member

    I'd test it take some soil u know is good mix 25% brick chips throw a seedling in the pot
     
  8.  
    Fastslappy

    Fastslappy Well-Known Member

    U got any feed stores near u that sell to horses ?
    They carry DryStall at $14 a 40 lb bag
    It's 100% mined screened pumice
     
    MrKnotty likes this.
  9.  
    sallen35

    sallen35 Member

    I love this thread and was doing some follow up research on nitrogen fixing blue-green algae and stumbled upon a PDF about nitrogen fixing cover crops. Its quite extensive.
    I would post link but as new user with no posts or likes yet, I cannot post a link. instead I will suggest a google search string, my apologies if this has already been linked.

    Search: Application of nitrogen-fixing systems in soil management
     
    Mazer, Chunky Stool and DonBrennon like this.
  10.  
    Tomula

    Tomula Active Member

    Have you ever tried lava rock? The hills of some volcanoes are one of the richest lands on planet.
     
  11.  
    Bed Wetter

    Bed Wetter Member

    It seems Agway/southernstates don’t carry it anymore, at least on the east coast. Now they do carry stall dry but it’s not pumice.
    I’ve contacted the makers of drystall for a distributor in the east but they haven’t gotten back to me.

    I have some pups headed to solo’s soon so I’ll test them and continue into larger containers too. There is so much brick out here in general. I suspect it may not perform as well but we’ll see how they turn out.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2017
    calliandra likes this.
  12.  
    Thegermling

    Thegermling Member

    Hey guys, ive always been an "organic" kind of guy. My last grow was organic, but I was using bottled organic nutrients. I want to ditch the bottled nutrients and step up to the REAL deal organics now. I respect each and everyone on this thread but I dont have the time to read 400+ pages at this time and I was wonderin if anyone can point me in the RIGHT direction to Clackamas Coot (Coot's) Notill/organic supersoil ( is it the same thing?) recipe (2017 version). Ive been trying to look for this guys account on ROI, Grasscity, IC, etc., with no luck, I think he goes by different names. Anyway, I heard Coot's organic soil is the best soil build out here in the organic world, top notch stuff. I would appreciate it if someone help me out with this. I dont want my first transition into REAL organics to be half assed. Reading that last line, I think I will start to read the 400+ pages, any help is appreciated though!
     
  13.  
    keepsake

    keepsake Well-Known Member

    Clack's recipe:

    1/3 sphagnum peat moss
    1/3 pumice stone
    1/3 compost and/or worm poo

    Mix all that together into 1 big pile. Make sure you make enough for how many pots you're growing. So, if you're growing in 4 pots that are 15 gallons each, make sure you make at least 60 gallons of the mix above.

    Now for the amendments (nutrients for plants), you need to figure out how many total cubic feet is your mix.
    1 cubic foot = 7 gallons.
    In this case, 60 gallons will be 8.8 cubic feet. I would round up to 9 and add the amendments below accordingly.

    1/2 cup per cubic feet (9 cubic feet = 4.5 cups):
    kelp meal
    neem meal
    crustacean meal
    fine grounded malted barley seeds

    2 cups per cubic feet (9 cubic feet = 18 cups):
    gypsum powder
    basalt rock powder

    Mix all of this up thoroughly, water it evenly all around until only a few drops come out when you squeeze a handful.
    Cover it up loosely and let sit for 4 weeks.

    --------------

    After 4 weeks, you can load up your pots and plant your seeds or clones. I would also sprinkle clover seeds, grokashi, and mosquito bits (BTIs) onto the top of soil and water in. Then, on top of that layer a 1/4 inch layer of rice hulls for mulch.

    clover seeds = cover crop and helps with nitrogen in soil
    BTI = prevents gnats before it starts
    grokashi = promotes microbial activity in the soil
    rice hulls layer = insulates the soil and keeps it moist longer

    From this point on out... all you have to do is water the pot every few days... with JUST WATER only. Or you can do silica, coconut water, aloe vera, compost teas, etc if you want to. But water only will still work and produce better results than any chemical bottled grow. This is what I'm currently doing in my tent, link is in my sig. Good luck dude.
     
    Tomula and Thegermling like this.
  14.  
    Chunky Stool

    Chunky Stool Well-Known Member

    I've got a giant aloe vera plant that needs to be trimmed. Can I use it for fertilizer?
     
  15.  
    keepsake

    keepsake Well-Known Member

    You can blend aloe vera flesh with water and water your plants. It's really good for them.
     
    MrKnotty likes this.
  16.  
    hillbill

    hillbill Well-Known Member

    Castings at 1/3 of mix can be pretty soupy. Over time I have come to keep castings at 10% and fill the void with Back to Nature Cotton Burr Compost (the only good brand I have found) and Black Kow manure or even good mushroom compost, something with more fiber or body to it. Since using leds I have increased drainage to 50% especially in cooler months.
     
  17.  
    Tyleb173rd

    Tyleb173rd Well-Known Member

    If you want an introduction to organics without bottled nutes look for a water only soil recipe.
     
  18.  
    Tyleb173rd

    Tyleb173rd Well-Known Member

    Well said. Increasing drainage in colder months is brilliant. Thanks for the idea......
     
  19.  
    Thegermling

    Thegermling Member

    Thanks for coots/clacks recipe. If you have a link to it I would appreciate it! Another question, I have a medical marijuana card and I was planning on doing notill outside. Should I do no till outside in a pot or straight in the ground? I was thinking of doing some raised beds and putting in coots recipe. Or I could just mix in whatever nutrients my soil needs. I'm currently waiting for my soil test results from Logans Lab. I live in washington state and it gets the best (worst) of both worlds. Scorching in the summer (100+) which may cook the plants roots if I go with raised beds unless I add a layer of hay to keep soil in raised bed cool (will that work), and the winter (sometimes lower than 30(f)). will that kill the worms or microbes living in my soil?Anyway, What are your prefrences/experiences. I would like feedback from outdoor growers ( leds, hps etc., is not "organic", its a bummer some of my fellow growers can only do it this way.)
     
  20.  
    hyroot

    hyroot Well-Known Member

    If you're on the east coast go to the soil makers They are similar to build a soil but on the east coast.


    www.makeorganicsoil.com

    Also worm power is based in New York.
     
    Bed Wetter and Tyleb173rd like this.

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