Will You Take The Vaccine?

Are you going to take the corona virus vaccine?

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DIY-HP-LED

Well-Known Member
Young Hispanic Americans in California much more likely to die of COVID than white counterparts (yahoo.com)

Young Hispanic Americans in California much more likely to die of COVID than white counterparts

Hispanic Americans between the ages of 20 and 54 were 8.5 times more likely than white Americans in the same age group to die of COVID-19, according to a recent study of California deaths.

Why it matters: Hispanic Americans experienced higher rates of COVID-19 infections than any other racial or ethnic group, per the New York Times. The study of California deaths, published this month, found that Hispanic Americans were also younger when they died, often in their prime of life.

  • The deaths of young Hispanic Americans led to "the unraveling of income streams and support networks," the Times noted.

What they're saying: The effects of a younger person's death are far-reaching, Dr. Mary Bassett, director of the François-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights at Harvard, told the New York Times.

  • “When you die young, you may be a critical breadwinner for your family," she said.
  • “You may have dependent children. And we know that losing a parent is not good for children and has an impact on their future development and psychological well-being.”
The big picture: The coronavirus pandemic has had a disproportionate impact on Black and Latino communities as a result of numerous engrained inequities within the health care system, Axios' Caitlin Owens reported.
 

printer

Well-Known Member
Young Hispanic Americans in California much more likely to die of COVID than white counterparts (yahoo.com)

Young Hispanic Americans in California much more likely to die of COVID than white counterparts

Hispanic Americans between the ages of 20 and 54 were 8.5 times more likely than white Americans in the same age group to die of COVID-19, according to a recent study of California deaths.

Why it matters: Hispanic Americans experienced higher rates of COVID-19 infections than any other racial or ethnic group, per the New York Times. The study of California deaths, published this month, found that Hispanic Americans were also younger when they died, often in their prime of life.

  • The deaths of young Hispanic Americans led to "the unraveling of income streams and support networks," the Times noted.

What they're saying: The effects of a younger person's death are far-reaching, Dr. Mary Bassett, director of the François-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights at Harvard, told the New York Times.

  • “When you die young, you may be a critical breadwinner for your family," she said.
  • “You may have dependent children. And we know that losing a parent is not good for children and has an impact on their future development and psychological well-being.”
The big picture: The coronavirus pandemic has had a disproportionate impact on Black and Latino communities as a result of numerous engrained inequities within the health care system, Axios' Caitlin Owens reported.
Not only inequities in the health care industry. But many work in the lower ranks of the health care industry. Also in jobs like factories, work that can not be done at home. Then they also have lesser housing, they can not afford to take off work when sick aggravating the sickness, passing it along to others in their social stratus. The same goes with many people of color. Mind you, whites in the same predicaments are also at a greater risk of catching covid and having worse outcomes. This is not a great surprise.
 

DIY-HP-LED

Well-Known Member
Not only inequities in the health care industry. But many work in the lower ranks of the health care industry. Also in jobs like factories, work that can not be done at home. Then they also have lesser housing, they can not afford to take off work when sick aggravating the sickness, passing it along to others in their social stratus. The same goes with many people of color. Mind you, whites in the same predicaments are also at a greater risk of catching covid and having worse outcomes. This is not a great surprise.
There are also genetic factors, covid hits native Americans and south sea islanders harder than Europeans, many Hispanics have native American genes. Socioeconomic conditions are important, but in the USA an effort is being made by the feds at least, to get minorities vaccinated, Canada too.
 

DIY-HP-LED

Well-Known Member
5 things we learned about the Indian variant today (yahoo.com)

5 things we learned about the Indian variant today

It has been another day of major coronavirus news as the Delta variant of coronavirus, first discovered in India, continues to spread across the UK.

Here is Yahoo News UK’s round-up of five important things we learned about the variant on Friday.

Cases more than tripled in week
Public Health England (PHE) said that as of Wednesday, the UK has seen 42,323 confirmed cases of the B.1.617.2 variant, up 29,892 from 12,431 a week ago, an increase of 240%.

Growth rates for Delta cases are high across all parts of the country, with regional estimates for doubling time ranging from four and a half to 11 1/2 days. The increase in confirmed cases has been driven partly by a reduction in test turnaround times and a faster process for identifying cases of the variant.

60% more transmissible
PHE estimates that the strain is 60% more transmissible compared with the previously dominant Alpha - or Kent variant.

The Alpha variant caused the UK's winter crisis of infections, hospital admissions and deaths. Researchers said it is "encouraging" that the huge increase in Delta variant case numbers has not yet translated into a similar increase in hospitalizations.

Delta now makes up up to 96% of new cases in England.

12 people have died from the Delta variant after having two COVID vaccinations
As of 7 June, there had been 42 deaths of people who had tested positive with the Delta variant. Of these, 12 were more than 14 days after their second dose.

Of 383 people admitted to hospital with the Delta variant, 251 were unvaccinated, 66 were more than 21 days after their first dose and 42 were more than 14 days after their second dose.

Of the 1,234 people who attended A&E in England between 1 February and 7 June who were confirmed as having the Delta variant, 67% were unvaccinated, 18% were more than 21 days after their first dose, and 83 7% were more than 14 days after their second dose.

Dr Jenny Harries, chief executive of the UK Health Security Agency, said: "Vaccination is our best defence. If you are eligible, we urge you to come forward and be vaccinated. Remember that two doses provide significantly more protection than a single dose."


Outbreaks in schools
A PHE technical briefing has confirmed there have been 217 outbreaks of the Delta variant in educational settings.

An estimated 1.8% of England’s state school pupils did not attend school on 27 May – the highest figure across the summer term to date, according to government figures.

This was even higher in some known hotspots of the variant, with one third of pupils in Bolton absent due to catching COVID or possible contact with the virus.

“It was very worrying, though not unexpected, that there was an increase in COVID-related pupil absence in the week before the half term holiday,” Geoff Barton from the Association for School and College Leaders (ASCL) said.

“We are clearly now seeing the impact of the Delta variant feeding through into these statistics, and this is reflected by the fact that absence is highest in areas that have been worst affected by the variant.”

Dr Zubaida Haque, a member of the Independent SAGE advisory body, Tweeted on Friday: "Matt Hancock recently admitted that 'a huge proportion of the latest cases are in children' and there is higher transmissibility among children, yet the govt have made NO ATTEMPT to make schools more COVID secure."

"Why haven't they reintroduced facemasks in secondary schools?," she asked.

Lockdown easing is in doubt
The government is said to be weighing up a delay of up to four weeks beyond the 21 June timeline set for the final stage of lifting lockdown restrictions.

The delay would be to enable all over-50s to be fully vaccinated with both doses of a vaccine, and also to allow sufficient time for the jabs to take effect.
...
 

Lordhooha

Well-Known Member
Oh goodie, I'm out of timeout in this thread. Here's some fun news:
It gives zero viable information on the death. he could have had an underlying issue no one knew about. But vaccines are pretty much good. Do you have a few ppl that will pass or have issues of course but IMO it’s a calculated risk for the greater good. I view it like my service to the country. Was there a chance I may die sure but it was a risk I took for the greater good.
 

printer

Well-Known Member
Canada tops world in vaccinated population as new COVID-19 cases fall below 1,000

The seven-day average for new cases now sits at 1,305, according to a Global News analysis of nationwide data -- the lowest average since Sept. 27, 2020.

Read in Global News: https://apple.news/A7SYuI8FYQVeox1ecLLLS5A
And Manitoba's anti-vaxers is helping to keep Canada's numbers up. Finally, my province is number one.

 

Unclebaldrick

Well-Known Member
Trfsrfr has an interesting Twitter account. Sexy photo, no tweets, but somehow ten followers from various foreign countries some of which post provocative disinformation. "She" claims to be in BC.

I would say that he isn't very good at it but that would assume that his target audience have functioning brains.
 

printer

Well-Known Member
Judge orders 178 hospital workers who refused vaccine to receive shots or be fired
A federal judge in Texas dismissed a lawsuit against Houston Methodist Hospital, first filed by a group of employees who were fighting its COVID-19 vaccine mandate.

Houston Methodist Hospital suspended 178 employees last week for refusing to comply with its June 7 deadline requiring employees to get vaccinated against the coronavirus. In response, 116 of the 178 suspended employees filed a lawsuit against the hospital .

In his ruling, U.S. District Judge Lynn Hughes referred to the lawsuit as “frivolous.”

"The public's interest in having a hospital capable of caring for patients during a pandemic far outweighs protecting the vaccination preferences of 116 employees," Hughes wrote. "The plaintiffs are not just jeopardizing their own health; they are jeopardizing the health of doctors, nurses, support staff, patients and their families."
 

VILEPLUME

Well-Known Member
I made another thread about this awhile ago. A safe and effective vaccine takes 10-15 years to develop. Mostly because the trail periods take so long and you won't know the true side effects sometimes 6 months to a year later.

I thought this was important and I want to update my comment from last year. The vaccine is definitely safe now, over 2 billion people have gotten the shot and no major problems to worry about. If you are worried about the blood clots from the vaccine, then you definitely don't want to catch covid.

 

printer

Well-Known Member
Alberta's COVID-19 vaccination rates tied to levels of formal education, data shows
An analysis of COVID-19 vaccination rates in Alberta suggests one socio-economic factor, in particular, is correlated to vaccine uptake. And it's not income, language or cultural barriers.

It's education.

This presents a particularly tricky challenge for those trying to combat vaccine hesitancy, especially as demand for first doses in the province appears to be waning.

Roughly 69 per cent of eligible Albertans have received a first dose so far, with just over 20 per cent being fully vaccinated. However, the province has been pushing for a threshold of 70 per cent with at least one shot in order to move to Stage 3 of its three-stage reopening plan, which would see many of its restrictions lifted.

Experts who have reviewed the education data say they are not particularly surprised by what it shows. In poll after poll of public opinion, people with higher levels of formal education tend to express more willingness — even eagerness — to get vaccinated against COVID-19.

Economist Blake Shaffer is the kind of guy who does a multivariate regression analysis in his spare time.

He recently took it upon himself to wade through reams of vaccination and census data, looking for patterns among the many social and economic indicators that might help explain why some Albertans have snapped up vaccines — and others haven't.

"What I found was it's actually education, more so than income, that seems to be driving it," said Shaffer, who works at the University of Calgary.

Simply put, he said, areas where more people have a university degree tend to have higher vaccination rates.

Vaccine coverage and no high school diploma
Alberta Health divides the province into 132 "local geographic areas," which fall into five broad health zones. This chart shows the percentage of eligible people in each area who have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine as of June 12, 2021 and the proportion of people in each area without a high-school diploma. Larger dots correspond to larger vaccine-eligible populations.

Can't paste the picture and related information properly here, you would be best to look at the result on the CBC page (don't worry, Canadian socialism will not rub off on you) It is worth the look.

 

DIY-HP-LED

Well-Known Member
Study finds a quarter of people with COVID-19 had new medical problems after | TheHill

Study finds a quarter of people with COVID-19 had new medical problems after


A quarter of people who had COVID-19 sought care for new medical problems at least a month after their diagnosis, according to a large study published on Tuesday, indicating the prevalence of long-haul COVID-19.

The research conducted by nonprofit FAIR Health determined from private health insurance claims that 23.2 percent of COVID-19 patients — amounting to more than 450,000 people — sought care for at least one post-COVID-19 symptom at least 30 days after diagnosis.

The study analyzed health records from almost 2 million people who were diagnosed with COVID-19 between February and December 2020 and tracked whether they developed new symptoms until February 2021. FAIR Health said the research is the largest to its knowledge looking into long-haul conditions among COVID-19 patients.

The most common new post-COVID-19 condition reported by the hundreds of thousands of patients was pain — including nerve inflammation and aches and pains — with more than 5 percent, or almost 100,000, reporting the symptom.

Breathing difficulties, high cholesterol, malaise and fatigue as well as high blood pressure were the next most common conditions. Intestinal symptoms, migraines, skin problems, heart abnormalities, sleep disorders and mental health conditions were also reported.

Patients did not have to have symptomatic COVID-19 to develop these conditions, as 19 percent of people who said they were asymptomatic reported these symptoms at least a month after diagnosis.

Almost 50 percent of patients who were hospitalized later reported post-COVID-19 conditions, as did 27 percent of those who reported mild or moderate symptoms.

FAIR Health said an independent academic reviewer examined the study, but the research was not peer-reviewed.

The study only included patients with private health insurance or Medicare Advantage, leaving out those who are uninsured or covered by Medicare Parts A, B and D and Medicaid. Patients with chronic pre-existing conditions were not included in the study due to the difficulty of distinguishing any post-COVID-19 symptoms from symptoms associated with the existing disease.

The research also did not compare the rates of post-COVID-19 conditions among people who did not have COVID-19, making it unclear if increases in these symptoms surpassed the levels of the general population.
 

DIY-HP-LED

Well-Known Member
People hospitalized with COVID-19 now have one overwhelming thing in common. They're not vaccinated. (yahoo.com)

People hospitalized with COVID-19 now have one overwhelming thing in common. They're not vaccinated.

In Minnesota, the HealthPartners system has seen a “precipitous decline” in COVID-19 hospitalizations, says Dr. Mark Sannes, an infectious disease physician and senior medical director for the system, which operates nine hospitals and more than 55 clinics. But now, nearly every admitted patient he does see is unvaccinated.

“Less than 1% of our hospitalized COVID patients are vaccinated," he said.

In Ohio, at University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, only 2% of the COVID-19 patients admitted in the last month were vaccinated, said Dr. Robert Salata, the hospital's physician-in-chief.

And at Sanford Health, which runs 44 medical centers and more than 200 clinics across the Dakotas, Minnesota and Iowa, less than 5% of the 1,456 patients admitted with COVID-19 so far this year were fully vaccinated, said spokesperson Angela Dejene.

Falling rates of COVID-19 across the United States mask a harsh reality – the overwhelming majority of those getting sick and being hospitalized today are unvaccinated, while vaccinated patients are becoming rare.

Hospitals in states with the lowest vaccination rates tend to have more COVID-19 patients in intensive care units, according to hospital data collected in the past week by the Department of Health and Human Services and vaccination rates published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Wyoming, Missouri, Arkansas and Idaho currently have the highest percentage of COVID-19 patients on average in their ICUs; those states all have vaccinated less than 40% of their population.

Medical centers say there's also an obvious change in the age of their sickest patients, as older people are much more likely to be vaccinated than younger.

"We're all seeing the same thing – when someone does get sick and comes to the hospital, they're much more likely to be young and unvaccinated," said Dr. Robert Wachter, professor and chair of the Department of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco.

Cathy Bennett, president and CEO of the New Jersey Hospital Association, said the picture is the same in her state.

"As COVID vaccinations rolled out across New Jersey, there’s been a major shift in the ages of patients admitted to the hospital," said Bennett. "Unlike last spring, when those 65 and older accounted for the majority of hospitalizations, we’re now seeing more young people hospitalized with COVID."

In Ohio, Salata said the shift should be reassuring, showing the vaccines work.

"It sends a very strong message to the hesitancy people out there because the data speaks for itself," he said.

'It's not all about you'
Doctors say there are multiple reasons people aren't yet vaccinated. There are the hesitant, who still have questions and sometimes fall prey to misinformation, and the opposed, who often harbor anti-government or anti-science sentiments.

"We've had a little success when we've spoken to them on a one-to-one basis. We can give them the information that they need to make their decision," said Dr. Gerald Maloney, chief medical officer for hospital services at Geisinger health network, which runs nine hospitals in Pennsylvania.

Some still can't easily access vaccine, either because it's not available nearby or because they can't get time off work.

And while the U.S. government paid for all vaccines and vaccinations so no one should be charged, others remain fearful they will be on the financial hook for a shot, Maloney said.

Last week, Health and Human Services secretary Secretary Xavier Becerra clarified in a letter that providers may not bill patients for COVID-19 vaccines.

There's still a lot of work to be done to create the trust necessary for these groups to embrace vaccination, Maloney said.

"The people who say, 'It's my body, my choice?' Well, it's not all about you," he said. "It's also about the people that you're around."

At this point, every vaccination is a win, one more person who can't pass the virus along. That's especially true in families where children can't be vaccinated and are still at risk.

At Akron Children’s Hospital in Ohio, “we have not seen any kiddos who have been admitted to the hospital who have been vaccinated,” said Dr. Michael Bigham, a pediatric intensivist in the critical care unit.

Among children 11 and younger, who can’t yet get the vaccine, having vaccinated family members is keeping them out of the hospital, and protecting them against MIS-C, the multisystem inflammatory syndrome that can be a rare but dangerous aftereffect of a COVID-19 infection in children.

“Most of the kids we’re seeing in the hospital with COVID or MIS-C had COVID in their household, maybe a parent or a grandparent, and most of those individuals had not been vaccinated,” he said.

The message from health care workers is unanimous: They just aren't seeing many vaccinated people get sick.

In New Jersey, the percentage of COVID-19 hospitalizations among those ages 18 to 29 has increased 58% since the beginning of the year. By comparison, the percentage of COVID-19 hospitalizations among the 65 and older age group – with a statewide vaccination rate of more than 80% – declined by 31.2%.

The numbers are no coincidence, Bennett said.

"Vaccination," she said, "works in preventing severe COVID illness."
 
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