Happy thread :)

schuylaar

Well-Known Member
More than 41,000 people have signed petitions to stop Jeff Bezos from returning to Earth after his trip to space next month (yahoo.com)

More than 41,000 people have signed petitions to stop Jeff Bezos from returning to Earth after his trip to space next month

  • Petitions to stop Jeff Bezos' Earth re-entry collected more than 41,000 signatures between them.
  • The one with the most signatures is entitled: "Do not allow Jeff Bezos to return to Earth."
  • Bezos will fly into space on July 20 for Blue Origin's first human flight of New Shepard rocket.
More than 41,000 people have signed petitions calling to stop Jeff Bezos from returning to Earth after he blasts into space next month.

Bezos, founder of space-exploration firm Blue Origin, said on June 7 that he and his brother Mark Bezos will fly into space aboard the New Shepard rocket on July 20 - the company's first human flight.

Three days after Bezos' announcement, two petitions were launched to try and prevent the billionaire's re-entry to Earth. They have both garnered thousands of followers in just 10 days.

More than 23,000 people have signed one Change.org petition titled: "Do not allow Jeff Bezos to return to Earth."

"Billionaire's should not exist...on earth, or in space, but should they decide the latter they should stay there," the petition's description said.

Some signatories gave a reason for signing the petition, which included comments such as "being let back into Earth is a privilege - not a right," and "Earth don't want people like Jeff, Bill [Gates], Elon [Musk] and other such billionaires."

Another petition, called "Petition To Not Allow Jeff Bezos Re-Entry To Earth," has accumulated more than 18,000 signatures and is quickly gaining traction.

Jose Ortiz, who set up the petition, said in the description that Bezos is "an evil overlord hellbent on global domination."

"The fate of humanity is in your hands," Ortiz also wrote.

Both petitions are aiming to get 25,000 signatures, making them two of the top signed petitions on Change.org, according to the website.

Bezos will take an 11-minute flight to the edge of space alongside his brother and the winner of the Blue Origin auction for a seat in the New Shepard spacecraft, which sold for $28 million. They'll be strapped into a dome-shaped capsule, which sits on top of the rocket booster.
lot's can and does go wrong up there. if something did happen would Amazon go up or down?
 

topcat

Well-Known Member
More than 41,000 people have signed petitions to stop Jeff Bezos from returning to Earth after his trip to space next month (yahoo.com)

More than 41,000 people have signed petitions to stop Jeff Bezos from returning to Earth after his trip to space next month

  • Petitions to stop Jeff Bezos' Earth re-entry collected more than 41,000 signatures between them.
  • The one with the most signatures is entitled: "Do not allow Jeff Bezos to return to Earth."
  • Bezos will fly into space on July 20 for Blue Origin's first human flight of New Shepard rocket.
More than 41,000 people have signed petitions calling to stop Jeff Bezos from returning to Earth after he blasts into space next month.

Bezos, founder of space-exploration firm Blue Origin, said on June 7 that he and his brother Mark Bezos will fly into space aboard the New Shepard rocket on July 20 - the company's first human flight.

Three days after Bezos' announcement, two petitions were launched to try and prevent the billionaire's re-entry to Earth. They have both garnered thousands of followers in just 10 days.

More than 23,000 people have signed one Change.org petition titled: "Do not allow Jeff Bezos to return to Earth."

"Billionaire's should not exist...on earth, or in space, but should they decide the latter they should stay there," the petition's description said.

Some signatories gave a reason for signing the petition, which included comments such as "being let back into Earth is a privilege - not a right," and "Earth don't want people like Jeff, Bill [Gates], Elon [Musk] and other such billionaires."

Another petition, called "Petition To Not Allow Jeff Bezos Re-Entry To Earth," has accumulated more than 18,000 signatures and is quickly gaining traction.

Jose Ortiz, who set up the petition, said in the description that Bezos is "an evil overlord hellbent on global domination."

"The fate of humanity is in your hands," Ortiz also wrote.

Both petitions are aiming to get 25,000 signatures, making them two of the top signed petitions on Change.org, according to the website.

Bezos will take an 11-minute flight to the edge of space alongside his brother and the winner of the Blue Origin auction for a seat in the New Shepard spacecraft, which sold for $28 million. They'll be strapped into a dome-shaped capsule, which sits on top of the rocket booster.
"And if you give me weed, whites and wine
And you show me a sign
I'll be willin' to be movin'" -Lowell George
 

DIY-HP-LED

Well-Known Member
Some good news for @Jimdamick who can now become an upstanding citizen! :lol:
Connecticut legalized marijuana. More states will follow. - Vox
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marijuana legalization has won
Marijuana legalization is sweeping states from Connecticut to New Mexico. The writing is on the wall.

The US is nearing a tipping point of sorts on marijuana legalization: Almost half the country — about 44 percent of the population — now lives in a state where marijuana is legal or soon will be legal to consume just for fun.

The past several months alone have seen a burst of activity as five states across the US legalized marijuana for recreational use: New Jersey, New York, Virginia, New Mexico, and, on Tuesday, Connecticut.

It’s a massive shift that took place over just a few years. A decade ago, no states allowed marijuana for recreational use; the first states to legalize cannabis in 2012, Colorado and Washington, did so through voter-driven initiatives. Now, 18 states and Washington, DC, have legalized marijuana (although DC doesn’t yet allow sales) — with six enacting their laws through legislatures, showing even typically cautious politicians are embracing the issue.

At this point, the question of nationwide marijuana legalization is more a matter of when, not if. At least two-thirds of the American public support the change, based on various public opinion surveys in recent years. Of the 15 states where marijuana legalization has been on the ballot since 2012, it was approved in 13 — including Republican-dominated Alaska, Montana, and South Dakota (although South Dakota’s measure is currently held up in the courts). In the 2020 election, the legalization initiative in swing state Arizona got nearly 300,000 more votes than either Joe Biden or Donald Trump.

Legalization has also created a big new industry in very populous states, including California and, soon, New York, and that industry is going to push to continue expanding. One of the US’s neighbors, Canada, has already legalized pot, and the other, Mexico, is likely to legalize it soon, creating an international market that would love to tap into US consumers.

The walls are closing in on this issue for legalization opponents — and quickly.

Many politicians have played it cautiously in response to these trends. While some high-profile Democrats, including Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, have come out in support, Biden continues to oppose legalization. Republicans, including Trump, are almost entirely opposed.

But at this point, their refusal comes off more like a last gasp than a movement that can hold back the tide of change. At a certain point, lawmakers will have to follow public opinion or risk losing an election. And the public has spoken very clearly, time and again.

What’s less clear is how it will happen. Maybe it’ll be a slow, state-by-state battle before the federal government ends its own prohibition on cannabis, or maybe federal action will lead to a flurry of states legalizing. What has become clear is that legalization will eventually win, and the vast majority of states, if not all, will soon join the ranks of the legalizers.

Marijuana legalization is very popular
In the span of two decades, marijuana legalization has gone from a fringe issue to one the vast majority of Americans embrace.

In 2000, just 31 percent of the country backed legalization while 64 percent opposed it, according to Gallup’s public surveys. By 2020, the numbers flipped: The most recent Gallup poll on the topic showed that 68 percent supported legalization and 32 percent were against it.

There are a few possible explanations for the flip. The general failure of the war on drugs to actually stop widespread drug addiction (see: the opioid epidemic), as well as backlash to the punitive policies the drug war brought, left a lot of Americans craving new approaches. The public has come to see marijuana as not so bad — less harmful than legal drugs such as alcohol or tobacco. The advent of the internet likely sped up some of these conversations, too, and the spread of medical marijuana might have shown more Americans that the US can handle the drug’s legalization.

1624408381583.png
 

DIY-HP-LED

Well-Known Member
Connecticut Legalizes Recreational Marijuana, With Sales Aimed for 2022 - The New York Times (nytimes.com)

Connecticut Legalizes Recreational Marijuana, With Sales Aimed for 2022
Legislation signed Tuesday permits the possession of up to one and a half ounces of cannabis and provides a clean slate for some with past convictions.

After years of failed attempts, Connecticut legalized recreational marijuana on Tuesday, laying the groundwork to direct cannabis revenue into communities of color that have long been targeted by policies criminalizing the drug.
Gov. Ned Lamont, a Democrat, signed a bill to legalize the use and cultivation of recreational cannabis and expunge thousands of past convictions for possession, after both houses of the state legislature passed the bill last week.

With his signature, Connecticut became the 19th state to legalize recreational marijuana and the fifth to do so this year after New Mexico, New York, Virginia and New Jersey.

“We had a chance to learn from others, and I think we got it right here in the state of Connecticut,” Mr. Lamont said Tuesday as he signed the bill into law.

The legislation is set to end an era of disproportionate convictions for marijuana possession against communities of color and pave the way for low-income residents to participate in the cannabis marketplace, injecting fresh revenue into the state’s economy and social welfare programs.

When the law takes effect July 1, using recreational marijuana will be legal and adults 21 and older will be allowed to possess up to one and a half ounces.

The Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection said it was aiming to begin issuing licenses to grow and sell marijuana by the end of next year. Half of all licenses will be issued to low-income applicants.

People will also be allowed to grow up to three mature plants and three immature plants for personal use starting in July 2023.

Those convicted of possession from Jan. 1, 2000 through Sept. 30, 2015 will have their records automatically cleared beginning in 2023. People with convictions from outside this time period can apply to have their records expunged starting next July.

“This has been years in the making,” said DeVaughn Ward, senior legislative council for the Marijuana Policy Project, a nationwide advocacy organization for marijuana legalization and one of the proponents of Connecticut’s bill. “The amount of revenue that will be generated and directed back into our distressed communities is an unprecedented investment in communities of color.”
 

DIY-HP-LED

Well-Known Member
cont...
A study by the University of Connecticut found that the marijuana industry could generate between $784 million and $952 million in revenue in the state over five years. That would be enough to help jump start the state’s economic recovery from the pandemic, the study’s authors said.

Tuesday’s signing marks an end to years of failed efforts to legalize the drug after the state approved it for medical use in 2012. Years later, dispensaries were still fighting to open for business.

People of color have been disproportionately penalized for marijuana possession in Connecticut, which decriminalized the possession of less than half an ounce of marijuana in 2011. Black people in the state were four times more likely to be arrested than white people for possession of marijuana, according to a report published last year by the American Civil Liberties Union.

Under the new law, the smell of marijuana alone will no longer be legal grounds to stop and search people. Nor will the suspected possession of up to five ounces.

“The war on cannabis, which was at its core a war on people in Black and Brown communities, not only caused injustices and increased disparities in our state, it did little to protect public health and safety,” Mr. Lamont said in a statement last week, after the State Senate passed the bill.

“We’re not only effectively modernizing our laws and addressing inequities, we’re keeping Connecticut economically competitive with our neighboring states,” he said.

Polls have shown that Americans overwhelmingly support legalization, with one study from the Pew Research Center this year finding that 60 percent of adults believe marijuana should be legal for medical and recreational use, while 31 percent support legalizing it for medical use only.

The Connecticut bill had a chaotic journey through the legislature. Mr. Lamont had previously threatened to veto the bill over a late amendment by the State Senate, which would have given preferential status to retail license applicants with past records of selling or using marijuana. House members stripped the bill of the provision before passing it last Wednesday.

Debate continued to rage on the floor of the State Senate Thursday in the final hours before the bill was passed by a 16-11 margin. Legislators who pushed back on the bill criticized its “social equity” provision, which calls for half of retail licenses to be issued to low-income applicants, and raised concerns about addiction and crime.

But State Senator Martin Looney, a Democrat and one of the legislation’s sponsors, argued that a regulated cannabis industry would make marijuana consumption safer and pointed to the profits the state stood to make.

“People drank before Prohibition, people drank during Prohibition, but the problem was profits went to organized crime rather than a regulated tax enterprise,” Mr. Looney said.

“Cannabis has been available for so long,” he added. “The reality is, it is already here.”
 

Jimdamick

Well-Known Member
Connecticut Legalizes Recreational Marijuana, With Sales Aimed for 2022 - The New York Times (nytimes.com)

Connecticut Legalizes Recreational Marijuana, With Sales Aimed for 2022
Legislation signed Tuesday permits the possession of up to one and a half ounces of cannabis and provides a clean slate for some with past convictions.

After years of failed attempts, Connecticut legalized recreational marijuana on Tuesday, laying the groundwork to direct cannabis revenue into communities of color that have long been targeted by policies criminalizing the drug.
Gov. Ned Lamont, a Democrat, signed a bill to legalize the use and cultivation of recreational cannabis and expunge thousands of past convictions for possession, after both houses of the state legislature passed the bill last week.

With his signature, Connecticut became the 19th state to legalize recreational marijuana and the fifth to do so this year after New Mexico, New York, Virginia and New Jersey.

“We had a chance to learn from others, and I think we got it right here in the state of Connecticut,” Mr. Lamont said Tuesday as he signed the bill into law.

The legislation is set to end an era of disproportionate convictions for marijuana possession against communities of color and pave the way for low-income residents to participate in the cannabis marketplace, injecting fresh revenue into the state’s economy and social welfare programs.

When the law takes effect July 1, using recreational marijuana will be legal and adults 21 and older will be allowed to possess up to one and a half ounces.

The Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection said it was aiming to begin issuing licenses to grow and sell marijuana by the end of next year. Half of all licenses will be issued to low-income applicants.

People will also be allowed to grow up to three mature plants and three immature plants for personal use starting in July 2023.

Those convicted of possession from Jan. 1, 2000 through Sept. 30, 2015 will have their records automatically cleared beginning in 2023. People with convictions from outside this time period can apply to have their records expunged starting next July.

“This has been years in the making,” said DeVaughn Ward, senior legislative council for the Marijuana Policy Project, a nationwide advocacy organization for marijuana legalization and one of the proponents of Connecticut’s bill. “The amount of revenue that will be generated and directed back into our distressed communities is an unprecedented investment in communities of color.”
Made my day :)
Doing the math now.
Perpetual with 3 plants ={2.5 ounces per plant average= 7.5 oz every month] :)
Yea, this is pretty cool :
Legal weed!!!!!!!!!!!!
Fucking A ;)
 

Jimdamick

Well-Known Member
Some good news for @Jimdamick who can now become an upstanding citizen! :lol:
Connecticut legalized marijuana. More states will follow. - Vox
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marijuana legalization has won
Marijuana legalization is sweeping states from Connecticut to New Mexico. The writing is on the wall.

The US is nearing a tipping point of sorts on marijuana legalization: Almost half the country — about 44 percent of the population — now lives in a state where marijuana is legal or soon will be legal to consume just for fun.

The past several months alone have seen a burst of activity as five states across the US legalized marijuana for recreational use: New Jersey, New York, Virginia, New Mexico, and, on Tuesday, Connecticut.

It’s a massive shift that took place over just a few years. A decade ago, no states allowed marijuana for recreational use; the first states to legalize cannabis in 2012, Colorado and Washington, did so through voter-driven initiatives. Now, 18 states and Washington, DC, have legalized marijuana (although DC doesn’t yet allow sales) — with six enacting their laws through legislatures, showing even typically cautious politicians are embracing the issue.

At this point, the question of nationwide marijuana legalization is more a matter of when, not if. At least two-thirds of the American public support the change, based on various public opinion surveys in recent years. Of the 15 states where marijuana legalization has been on the ballot since 2012, it was approved in 13 — including Republican-dominated Alaska, Montana, and South Dakota (although South Dakota’s measure is currently held up in the courts). In the 2020 election, the legalization initiative in swing state Arizona got nearly 300,000 more votes than either Joe Biden or Donald Trump.

Legalization has also created a big new industry in very populous states, including California and, soon, New York, and that industry is going to push to continue expanding. One of the US’s neighbors, Canada, has already legalized pot, and the other, Mexico, is likely to legalize it soon, creating an international market that would love to tap into US consumers.

The walls are closing in on this issue for legalization opponents — and quickly.

Many politicians have played it cautiously in response to these trends. While some high-profile Democrats, including Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, have come out in support, Biden continues to oppose legalization. Republicans, including Trump, are almost entirely opposed.

But at this point, their refusal comes off more like a last gasp than a movement that can hold back the tide of change. At a certain point, lawmakers will have to follow public opinion or risk losing an election. And the public has spoken very clearly, time and again.

What’s less clear is how it will happen. Maybe it’ll be a slow, state-by-state battle before the federal government ends its own prohibition on cannabis, or maybe federal action will lead to a flurry of states legalizing. What has become clear is that legalization will eventually win, and the vast majority of states, if not all, will soon join the ranks of the legalizers.

Marijuana legalization is very popular
In the span of two decades, marijuana legalization has gone from a fringe issue to one the vast majority of Americans embrace.

In 2000, just 31 percent of the country backed legalization while 64 percent opposed it, according to Gallup’s public surveys. By 2020, the numbers flipped: The most recent Gallup poll on the topic showed that 68 percent supported legalization and 32 percent were against it.

There are a few possible explanations for the flip. The general failure of the war on drugs to actually stop widespread drug addiction (see: the opioid epidemic), as well as backlash to the punitive policies the drug war brought, left a lot of Americans craving new approaches. The public has come to see marijuana as not so bad — less harmful than legal drugs such as alcohol or tobacco. The advent of the internet likely sped up some of these conversations, too, and the spread of medical marijuana might have shown more Americans that the US can handle the drug’s legalization.

View attachment 4928928
"Some good news for @Jimdamick who can now become an upstanding citizen!"
'! missed that boat a long time ago.
All I can do now is hope there is no Hell, because they probaly have a chair wating for me right now
Oh well
I had fun though :)
 

TacoMac

Well-Known Member
Fear, hate and superstition. Sounds like politics. Oh, shit! Doomed to a life of politics! What could be worse?
It's literally the same thing: keep the populace ignorant, tell them falsehoods to make them afraid and convince them they need you, and shame you into giving them money willingly.
 

DIY-HP-LED

Well-Known Member
Trumper Woodstock, a white trash festival of madness...
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
‘Redneck Rave’ Descends Into Throat Slashing, Impalements, and Mass Arrests (thedailybeast.com)

‘Redneck Rave’ Descends Into Throat Slashing, Impalements, and Mass Arrests

MUD-SLINGING
By the end of the five-day bash, Edmonson County authorities had arrested 14 people, and charged four dozen people from five states.


1624461847059.png

A massive country music festival in Kentucky this past weekend started off on rocky footing: Police found meth, marijuana, and an open bottle of alcohol in the first vehicle they stopped at a traffic checkpoint. One of the people in the car had two active warrants out for their arrest.

“We were like, ‘Well, this doesn’t bode well for the weekend,’” Edmonson County Sheriff Shane Doyle told the Lexington Herald-Leader.

By the end of the five-day bash, dubbed the “Redneck Rave,” one man had been impaled, one woman had been strangled to the point of unconsciousness, and one throat had been slit. In all, Edmonson authorities arrested 14 people, and charged four dozen people from five states.

The event, organized by country rapper Justin Time, took place in Blue Holler Offroad Park and drew a crowd of tens of thousands, doubling the population of the unincorporated town of Ollie, which is so small it does not have a stoplight. Redneck Rave promoters bragged that they had sold more than 20,000 tickets. The lengthy getdown, advertised as the “biggest country party you’ll ever go to,” boasted a demolition derby, goldfish racing, and a full-scale football game as well as a series of concerts.

The details of the Redneck Rave’s incidents are grisly. One person slit a friend’s throat and remains at large, a 29-year-old man had allegedly strangled a woman until she passed out, one person lost the better part of a finger, and another was impaled when he drove a side-by-side over a 2-3 inch log that broke through the bottom of the recreational vehicle. Paramedics left the log inside him as they airlifted him to a hospital.

Justin Time, whose legal name is Justin Stowers, wrote on Facebook, “This was the biggest event we’ve ever done and with as many people and random things that popped up unexpectedly I feel like we all handled it very well.”

Doyle told the Herald-Leader last year’s Redneck Raves—there were two—“overwhelmed” his staff. He ordered all his deputies to work mandatory overtime this year and requested assistance from the Kentucky State Police. At least one person died at the event last year. Another Redneck Rave is scheduled for October of this year.

“There were so many intoxicated people, we just decided, ‘If dispatch sends an ambulance in, we’re sending a deputy in with them,’” said Doyle.

Six of the festival-goers face felony charges, and the sheriff’s office filed roughly 30 charges stemming from drug and alcohol violations.
 
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