Examples of Democratic Party leadership

DIY-HP-LED

Well-Known Member
It would appear a "moderate" democrat, is a bought democrat.
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Video Reveals Oil Lobbyist Go-To List Of Senators To Undercut Climate Action

In an undercover video, a lobbyist for ExxonMobil revealed his go-to list of senators for undermining climate action—and who he considers the “kingmaster.”
 

hanimmal

Well-Known Member
I was thinking, the social media companies should get some kind of work visa's for these folks. They could use the help combatting propaganda in these languages, and these people seem like a logical choice.

https://apnews.com/article/aghanistan-us-evacuation-7efdf3059a2d356b8d8506d991aca9f5
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WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration said Wednesday that it is prepared to begin evacuation flights for Afghan interpreters and translators who aided the U.S. military effort in the nearly 20-year war — but their destinations are still unknown and there are lingering questions about how to ensure their safety until they can get on planes.

The Operation Allies Refuge flights out of Afghanistan during the last week of July will be available first for special immigrant visa applicants already in the process of applying for U.S. residency, according to the White House.

White House press secretary Jen Psaki declined to detail how many Afghans are expected to be among those evacuated in the first flights or where those evacuated will be taken, citing security concerns.

“The reason that we are taking these steps is because these are courageous individuals,” Psaki said. “We want to make sure we recognize and value the role they’ve played over the last several years.”

Confirmation on the timeline of the evacuation flights came as President Joe Biden met Wednesday with Gen. Austin “Scott” Miller, who earlier this week stepped down as the top U.S. commander in Afghanistan. Psaki said Biden wanted to personally thank Miller for conducting an “orderly and safe” drawdown of U.S. troops.

Miller, who oversaw the war effort for nearly three years, expressed dire concern in his final days as commander about the rapid loss of districts around the country to the Taliban, telling reporters that “ a civil war is certainly a path that can be visualized if this continues on the trajectory it’s on right now.” Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin, who met separately with Miller at the Pentagon, praised the general for planning a “complex withdrawal of millions of tons of equipment and thousands of personnel” that “thus far been conducted without a single casualty.”

Biden has faced pressure from lawmakers on both parties to come up with a plan to help evacuate Afghan military helpers before next month’s U.S. troop withdrawal. The White House began briefing lawmakers on the outlines of their plans last month.

The evacuation planning could potentially affect tens of thousands of Afghans. Several thousand Afghans who worked for the United States — plus their family members — are already in the application pipeline for special immigrant visas.

RELATED COVERAGE
The Biden administration has also been working on identifying a third country or U.S. territory that could host Afghans while their visa applications are processed.

Krish O’Mara Vignarajah, president and CEO of Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service, said that much about the Biden evacuation plan remains unknown, including how the administration will help those in areas outside the capital of Kabul evacuate. The Taliban have made rapid gains in taking over huge swaths of the country, particularly in more rural areas.

“Unfortunately, there are still far too many questions left unanswered, including who exactly and how many people are eligible for evacuation. ... How will those outside the capital access safety?” said Vignarajah, whose group has helped resettle thousands of Afghans in the U.S. “And to what countries will they be evacuated? We have serious concerns about the protection of our allies’ human rights in countries that have been rumored as potential partners in this effort.”

The administration is weighing using State Department-chartered commercial aircraft, not military aircraft, according to an administration official, who was not authorized to publicly discuss internal deliberations and spoke on condition of anonymity.

But if the State Department requests military aircraft, the U.S. military would be ready to assist, the official said. The Pentagon said as of Wednesday no requests for such assistance have been made by State.

Tracey Jacobson, a three-time chief of mission in Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Kosovo, is leading the State Department coordination unit charged with overseeing Operation Allies Refuge. That unit also includes representatives from the departments of Defense and Homeland Security.

Russ Travers, deputy homeland security adviser and former head of the National Counterterrorism Center, is coordinating the interagency policy process for the evacuation, officials said.

Separately, the White House announced that Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall, the White House homeland security adviser, would lead a U.S. delegation to a security conference in Uzbekistan this week to discuss Afghanistan’s security issues with leaders from Central Asia.

The Biden administration is considering a number of locations, including military installations both abroad and in the continental United States, to temporarily house Afghans while their visa applications are considered.

Pentagon Press Secretary John Kirby said Wednesday the Pentagon has identified an unspecified number of overseas locations as “potential candidates,” but no final decisions have been made.

The U.S. Embassy in Kabul issued 299 special immigrant visas in March, 356 in April and 619 in May, according to the State Department. Biden said last week that the federal government has approved 2,500 special immigrant visas to come to the U.S. since his January inauguration.

An estimated 18,000 Afghans have worked for the U.S. as interpreters, drivers and other positions have applied for visas and await their applications being processed. Psaki reiterated that the White House is working with Congress on legislation to streamline the application process.

Biden announced last week that the U.S. military operation in Afghanistan will end on Aug. 31.

The firming of the date to end the war comes after President Donald Trump’s administration negotiated a deal with the Taliban to end the U.S. military mission by May 1, 2021. Biden, after taking office, announced that U.S. troops would be out by the 20th anniversary of the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. The attacks were plotted by al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden from Afghanistan, where he had been given refuge by the Taliban.

George W. Bush, who as president launched the war, criticized the Western withdrawal in an interview with a German broadcaster released Wednesday, saying he fears for Afghan women and girls as the Taliban regains control of much of the country.

“It’s unbelievable how that society changed from the brutality of the Taliban, and all of a sudden — sadly — I’m afraid Afghan women and girls are going to suffer unspeakable harm,” Bush said.
 

printer

Well-Known Member
It is sad the country will revert to the Middle Ages again. At least the next life will be better than the current one for the inhabitants. Some will find that sooner than others.
 

schuylaar

Well-Known Member
you know what to do..


:lol: this could possibly push him over the edge though..it's the little things that matter.

FTW he doesn't have hair; he's mad that he can't wash out all that hairspray out of his rats nest. at least be truthful about why..people that use a lot of product or have long hair? you have to stand there longer.

on toilets? if you have to flush more than once or twice, you're eating wrong.
 
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DIY-HP-LED

Well-Known Member
After the last election Bernie knows where the country stands and where he stands, on the side of liberal democracy. Bernie also apprehends the danger the country is in right now and the threat the republicans represent to it's founding principles. There are only two sides in the current fight, the fascists and the patriots and Bernie seems happy enough with Joe Biden, it's Joe Manchin he has an issue with, as do many Americans. Manchin isn't a moderate, he's bought and paid for, using his position for personal gain by being a bottleneck for change. The fight between left and right will be fought out inside the democratic party between the honest and the bought, the republicans are a write off.
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Strange but true: Bernie takes a 'very pragmatic' turn - POLITICO

Strange but true: Bernie takes a 'very pragmatic' turn
The Vermont Independent, often depicted by the media and Republicans as well to the left of his party, is showing a conciliatory side.

Bernie Sanders gave Washington whiplash this week — and it was all part of his plan.

Barely 24 hours after the Vermont senator publicly rejected a $3.5 trillion spending deal following a Monday meeting with President Joe Biden, he turned around to tout it as the most transformational policy proposal in nearly 100 years.
The shift in tone was a tactic Sanders used to coax moderate Democrats into going far higher than they might have otherwise felt comfortable. After he had insisted on shooting for the moon with a $6 trillion budget proposal, $3.5 trillion suddenly looked pretty reasonable.

The episode revealed a conciliatory side to the liberal icon often depicted by the media and Republicans as wild-eyed and well to the left of his party. Sanders has opposed some of Biden and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer’s policies and nominees, but never in instances when his vote would prove decisive. He’s also softened his opposition to a bipartisan infrastructure deal, recognizing that he can't alienate his fellow Democrats if he wants to move his own agenda.
Still, the Independent from Vermont isn’t quite ready for the “P” label.

“It’s not that I’m more pragmatic. It’s that there are 50 members of the Democratic Caucus. And unfortunately not all of them agree with me on everything,” Sanders said in an interview.

“It was important to have a vision going forward of where we needed to go. And I think that was the right vision,” Sanders added. “Obviously, it was a vision that was a little bit more comprehensive than some of my colleagues.”

Even after two presidential runs garnered him national stardom and effective ownership of the American left, Sanders has toiled in the Senate minority with few levers to pull. This Congress, as the Senate Budget chair and a member of Schumer’s leadership team, the 79-year-old is one of the most powerful people in Democratic-controlled Washington.

He also seems to be having a good time after decades of prowling the Capitol with gruff rebuttals for reporters delivered in his signature Brooklyn accent. After his interview with POLITICO, he was pressed by another reporter to take “one more question.”

“She makes me speculate,” he teased the second reporter, his voice rising in playful incredulousness. “One more question?!”

Jokes aside, moderates surmised it wasn’t easy for Sanders to shed his uncompromising stance on this year's massive spending blueprint, which is still perhaps months away from becoming law. Tester, who quickly endorsed Sanders’ budget blueprint, despite reservations, observed that Sanders likely “had hesitation” in coming down by $2.5 trillion.

“It may have been one of those deals where it was: ‘Look, Bernie, if we don’t get this, we can’t do anything.’ And he decided to move with it,” Tester said of the haggling.

Yet senators on the Budget Committee viewed Sanders as taking an extreme position precisely so that it would yield a compromise all the more fruitful for liberal Democrats. If Sanders had started off endorsing Biden’s number of $4 trillion, it’s possible he and other progressives might have had to settle for a number lower than the $3.5 trillion they agreed upon.

“Bernie Sanders is like a human embodiment of shifting the Overton Window,” said Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.), who serves on the Budget Committee. “We wouldn’t be there without him putting out $6 trillion.”

With a ceiling of $3.5 trillion, Sanders says he can pursue all the changes that he’s prioritized, just not for not as long as he wants. That raises the possibility of future fights over the extension of programs like the expanded child tax credits championed by Democrats.

Nonetheless, Sanders argues every chance he gets that he’s pushing “the most consequential piece of legislation passed since the 1930s for working people.” On the price tag alone, he’s right: If successful, the current social spending bill will be the biggest ever passed by Congress.
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DIY-HP-LED

Well-Known Member
Independent voters are persuadable voters and a majority of them probably lean to the right, their ranks having been bolstered by former republicans who can't stomach Trump.
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Joe Biden's Approval Rating Is Soaring Among Independents (newsweek.com)

Joe Biden's Approval Rating Is Soaring Among Independents

President Joe Biden's approval rating among independent voters has soared following a sharp decline at the end of June, according to an Ipsos survey.

The Ipsos weekly approval tracker found that Biden's rating among independents stood at 52 percent in its latest survey, which was conducted on July 14 and 15.

The president's overall approval rating is 53 percent and his disapproval is 42 percent. The survey's margin of error is 3.5 percentage points.

Biden enjoys 88 percent approval among Democrats—a slight dip from 91 percent in the previous survey on July 7 and 8. His approval among Republicans stands at 17 percent, up from 13 percent a week earlier.

The approval figure from independent voters has risen sharply in recent weeks.

The last time Biden's approval among independents hit 50 percent in the Ipsos survey was June 17-18. On June 24-25, the figure fell to 45 percent.

A week later, in the June 30-July 1 research, Biden's approval among independents tumbled to just 34 percent—the lowest figure in the Ipsos survey since he took office in January.

A week later, in the July 7-8 survey, the approval rating among independents recovered to 44 percent. It has now risen another 8 points to 52 percent.

The president also enjoys high approval from independents for his handling of key issues in the latest Ipsos survey. On the coronavirus pandemic, 59 percent of independents approve of Biden. His overall approval rating on COVID-19 also stands at 59 percent.

Opinions on the president's performance broadly follow party lines, with 86 percent of Democrats approving of his approach to COVID-19 compared to just 33 percent of Republicans.
 

CunningCanuk

Well-Known Member
Independent voters are persuadable voters and a majority of them probably lean to the right, their ranks having been bolstered by former republicans who can't stomach Trump.
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Joe Biden's Approval Rating Is Soaring Among Independents (newsweek.com)

Joe Biden's Approval Rating Is Soaring Among Independents

President Joe Biden's approval rating among independent voters has soared following a sharp decline at the end of June, according to an Ipsos survey.

The Ipsos weekly approval tracker found that Biden's rating among independents stood at 52 percent in its latest survey, which was conducted on July 14 and 15.

The president's overall approval rating is 53 percent and his disapproval is 42 percent. The survey's margin of error is 3.5 percentage points.

Biden enjoys 88 percent approval among Democrats—a slight dip from 91 percent in the previous survey on July 7 and 8. His approval among Republicans stands at 17 percent, up from 13 percent a week earlier.

The approval figure from independent voters has risen sharply in recent weeks.

The last time Biden's approval among independents hit 50 percent in the Ipsos survey was June 17-18. On June 24-25, the figure fell to 45 percent.

A week later, in the June 30-July 1 research, Biden's approval among independents tumbled to just 34 percent—the lowest figure in the Ipsos survey since he took office in January.

A week later, in the July 7-8 survey, the approval rating among independents recovered to 44 percent. It has now risen another 8 points to 52 percent.

The president also enjoys high approval from independents for his handling of key issues in the latest Ipsos survey. On the coronavirus pandemic, 59 percent of independents approve of Biden. His overall approval rating on COVID-19 also stands at 59 percent.

Opinions on the president's performance broadly follow party lines, with 86 percent of Democrats approving of his approach to COVID-19 compared to just 33 percent of Republicans.
The Republicans are paying the price for pandering to trump’s base of deplorables. Love it.
 

DIY-HP-LED

Well-Known Member
The Republicans are paying the price for pandering to trump’s base of deplorables. Love it.
We can only hope, but the past 4 years and Trump and the GOP's level of support in 2020 was a sobering moment for many, including myself. They might have lost some support over 1/6, but don't count on it, it's less than a year and a half until the 2022 election and much depends on Donald's legal fate. I figure a year is more than enough time to put him in Sing sing at this point. I gotta tell ya, how the house and senate will look in 2023 is a roll of the dice at this point.

I thought this shit would be over with a landslide victory for the democrats in 2020, but it's really just getting going. I'm particularly interested in the justice angle and when Donald goes down I figure it will be spectacular! This is gonna provide years of entertainment and anxiety, at least until they drive the GOP into the fucking ground and get responsible government with democratic majorities.
 

DIY-HP-LED

Well-Known Member
With Biden getting strong support from independents and trump’s base dying off, 2022 could be a good year for the Democrats.
I'm hoping Donald will go to prison, blames the republicans for being insufficiently loyal and walks his base out of the party or tells them to stay home. It's good NY is gonna bust him, no possibility of a future federal pardon there and Biden will have clean hands. I think Trump will run for the 2024 republican nomination from his cell in Sing sing and win it, he won't have much else to do in a NY state maximum security prison, so why not?

Most independents these days are former republicans, they've had the most reason to leave their party, but they still lean right and will elect republicans. Joe's wise policies, steady hand and the fact he's white as snow is appealing to many of them, he just needs to get some shit done.
 
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