Examples of Democratic Party leadership

Fogdog

Well-Known Member
This thread must start with the Covid relief bill:

Biden's Covid stimulus plan: It costs $1.9tn but what's in it?
The US is poised to pass its third major spending package of the pandemic - a $1.9tn (£1.4tn) plan that President Joe Biden has championed as a way to help struggling Americans.

Leaders of his Democratic Party, which has a slim majority in Congress, are planning to pass the so-called American Rescue Plan by mid-March. The Senate approved it on Saturday, with the lower House of Representatives expected to endorse it next week.


It passed 51:50 in a purely partisan vote in the Senate. What is in it you say?

Direct payments
The plan calls on the government to send out $1,400 per person, with the payments quickly phasing out for those with higher incomes - at $75,000 for a single person and couples making more than $150,000.

Additional jobless assistance
The bill provides money to extend jobless benefits until September. That's a critical reprieve for the more than four million long-term unemployed, whose eligibility for benefits is currently due to expire in mid-March.

The plan tops up weekly jobless payments by $300 - the same amount as Congress approved in December's aid package.

Support for parents
Democrats intend to give parents of children under the age of 18 a year of monthly benefits worth $250-$300, depending on age.
The measure works by temporarily increasing the worth of America's existing child tax credit from $2,000 annually to as much as $3,600, and making the benefits available in advance.

Money for Covid-19 tests and vaccines
Mr Biden has called for devoting $50bn to improve testing centres and another $20bn to develop a national vaccination campaign, including setting up community centres and hiring new workers to administer the shots.
"We cannot rescue our economy without first containing the virus," Democrats said as they advanced the plans.

School reopening funds
The bill sends $170bn to schools and universities to help them take steps to reopen, like buying masks and cleaning supplies, upgrading ventilation systems and creating smaller class sizes.
Mr Biden has made reopening a top priority, responding to studies that show students with remote schooling falling behind. It's also seen as a factor preventing parents from returning to work.

Business support
The bill includes grants for small businesses as well as more targeted funds: $25bn for restaurants and bars; $15bn for airlines and another $8bn for airports; $30bn for transit; $1.5bn for Amtrak and $3bn for aerospace manufacturing.

Funds for local governments
Unlike prior stimulus packages, this one provides $350bn for local governments, many of which are facing higher expenses and lower revenues due to the economic downturn.

Paid leave and health insurance help
The plan reinstates the requirement - which expired at the end of 2020 - that employers offer paid sick leave to staff who contract Covid-19, are exposed to the virus and must quarantine; or are caring for sick family members.
It also aims to make it easier for more people to buy health insurance independently.


Leadership. Pure and simple. Biden and Democrats came into office promising to help people recover from the effects of this epidemic and that's exactly what they are doing with this bill.

"It's too much" is the Republican refrain. As if their trickle down solutions ever worked. As if this tactic by them in the early part of the last decade held up.

"It's too much", when by Republican's own words, a civil war is brewing and an attempt to take over the government did not just happen. Biden's administration knows that doing too little will waste resources and time. Not only will this package rescue millions from dropping into poverty but it may even rescue our constitutional democratic republic at the same time.

"It's too much" when we've seen piggish Republican leaders and corporations at the trough, running up the deficit and enriching themselves with stock buy-backs instead of making investments that would build up our economy.
 

Fogdog

Well-Known Member
But really, I started this thread to show another and better Democratic value on display: the ability to have a debate and discuss how to fix our broken Senate.


Sen. Joe Manchin said Sunday he is open to altering the Senate filibuster to make it more “painful” for the minority party to wield, while reiterating his opposition to ending the procedural hurdle altogether.

“The filibuster should be painful, it really should be painful and we've made it more comfortable over the years,” he said on “Fox News Sunday.” “Maybe it has to be more painful.”

Manchin (D-W.Va.) has previously supported efforts to require senators to filibuster by talking on the chamber floor in order to hold up a bill, an idea he raised on NBC’s “Meet the Press.”

“If you want to make it a little bit more painful, make him stand there and talk,” Manchin said. “I'm willing to look at any way we can, but I'm not willing to take away the involvement of the minority.”


Joe Manchin. I'd hate him if he were my Senator. But he is not. He's West Virginia's guy. Most West Virginians love him. That's democracy for you. I expect my Senators (Wyden and Merkley) to work with him.

Prior to 1990's, the filibuster was rarely used. Today, it's the go-to tool of Republicans whenever they want to stop something. They made the filibuster easy to use -- a Senator simply checks off a box on a computer screen and all by himself he can stop a bill from proceeding through the senate. Some Democrats want to eliminate the filibuster altogether. Manchin supports a limited filibuster because he believes those in the political minority should have a voice in the making of our laws. He's willing to make changes but not eliminate it. In other words, he wants a debate about what to do and why. Democrats are listening and reacting to this by having a discussion. Such a different reaction compared to what Trump's Republicans did when they held power.

Despite high sounding words about how the filibuster protects the rights of a minority, it has mostly been used to stop civil rights legislation.

Two of the most famous uses of the movie-version filibuster mentioned above were by the segregationist senator Strom Thurmond, who in 1957 held the Senate floor for more than 24 hours in an attempt to block civil rights legislation – and who mounted a sequel filibuster to sequel legislation in 1964.

“For generations, the filibuster was used as a tool to block progress on racial justice,” Senator Elizabeth Warren, who is eager to bin the filibuster, told the National Action Network in 2019. “And in recent years, it’s been used by the far right as a tool to block progress on everything.”


So, yeah, saying the filibuster is needed to protect democracy and freedom is bullshit.

Republicans -- Trump's Republicans -- only care about defeating Democrats. They will use the filibuster to prevent Joe Biden and Democrats from fulfilling promises to properly manage the US's recovery from the Covid epidemic and when the epidemic is over, to bring back jobs lost due to the epidemic. To them, its all about power. Stop Democrats from helping people so they can take away the Senate or the House in 2022. One could say that Republicans are why we need to end the filibuster.

With GOP partisan use of the filibuster hanging as a threat to Democratic lawmakers who are trying to get help to where it is needed in this disaster.
With GOP partisan use of the filibuster as a tool to re-take power in Washington.
With GOP attempting to overthrow the US government just weeks away as an example of why we can't let that happen.

With all that hanging as a threat, Democrats are engaging in a debate about the filibuster, what it's good for and how to keep what's best while getting rid of the bad. Despite a very real threat from Republicans to dismantle our democracy if they ever gain power again. Democrats are having a thoughtful discussion on what is best for this country and how to make progress while protecting our democracy.

That is leadership.
 
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DIY-HP-LED

Well-Known Member
Finally, some intelligence running things. It’s amazing considering the place we came from. That horrible orange planet of Donald Trump. Wasn’t that painful? Thank god it’s over!!
Now make sure ya bury the fucker real good, along with his "movement", the assholes will remain, but they will be leaderless and may schism. To kill a snake, cut off it's head.
 

DIY-HP-LED

Well-Known Member
But really, I started this thread to show another and better Democratic value on display: the ability to have a debate and discuss how to fix our broken Senate.


Sen. Joe Manchin said Sunday he is open to altering the Senate filibuster to make it more “painful” for the minority party to wield, while reiterating his opposition to ending the procedural hurdle altogether.

“The filibuster should be painful, it really should be painful and we've made it more comfortable over the years,” he said on “Fox News Sunday.” “Maybe it has to be more painful.”

Manchin (D-W.Va.) has previously supported efforts to require senators to filibuster by talking on the chamber floor in order to hold up a bill, an idea he raised on NBC’s “Meet the Press.”

“If you want to make it a little bit more painful, make him stand there and talk,” Manchin said. “I'm willing to look at any way we can, but I'm not willing to take away the involvement of the minority.”


Joe Manchin. I'd hate him if he were my Senator. But he is not. He's West Virginia's guy. Most West Virginians love him. That's democracy for you. I expect my Senators (Wyden and Merkley) to work with him.

Prior to 1990's, the filibuster was rarely used. Today, it's the go-to tool of Republicans whenever they want to stop something. They made the filibuster easy to use -- a Senator simply checks off a box on a computer screen and all by himself he can stop a bill from proceeding through the senate. Some Democrats want to eliminate the filibuster altogether. Manchin supports a limited filibuster because he believes those in the political minority should have a voice in the making of our laws. He's willing to make changes but not eliminate it. In other words, he wants a debate about what to do and why. Democrats are listening and reacting to this by having a discussion. Such a different reaction compared to what Trump's Republicans did when they held power.

Despite high sounding words about how the filibuster protects the rights of a minority, it has mostly been used to stop civil rights legislation.

Two of the most famous uses of the movie-version filibuster mentioned above were by the segregationist senator Strom Thurmond, who in 1957 held the Senate floor for more than 24 hours in an attempt to block civil rights legislation – and who mounted a sequel filibuster to sequel legislation in 1964.

“For generations, the filibuster was used as a tool to block progress on racial justice,” Senator Elizabeth Warren, who is eager to bin the filibuster, told the National Action Network in 2019. “And in recent years, it’s been used by the far right as a tool to block progress on everything.”


So, yeah, saying the filibuster is needed to protect democracy and freedom is bullshit.

Republicans -- Trump's Republicans -- only care about defeating Democrats. They will use the filibuster to prevent Joe Biden and Democrats from fulfilling promises to properly manage the US's recovery from the Covid epidemic and when the epidemic is over, to bring back jobs lost due to the epidemic. To them, its all about power. Stop Democrats from helping people so they can take away the Senate or the House in 2022. One could say that Republicans are why we need to end the filibuster.

With GOP partisan use of the filibuster hanging as a threat to Democratic lawmakers who are trying to get help to where it is needed in this disaster.
With GOP partisan use of the filibuster as a tool to re-take power in Washington.
With GOP attempting to overthrow the US government just weeks away as an example of why we can't let that happen.

With all that hanging as a threat, Democrats are engaging in a debate about the filibuster, what it's good for and how to keep what's best while getting rid of the bad. Despite a very real threat from Republicans to dismantle our democracy if they ever gain power again. Democrats are having a thoughtful discussion on what is best for this country and how to make progress while protecting our democracy.

That is leadership.
Rural infrastructure will bring Manchin around, used to be guys like that were bought off with something sweet for their state. Say rural broadband coupled with free basic cable TV for instance (no "free" political channels, just the networks), kill two birds with one stone and improve their access to responsible news.

Joe has a lot of experience in the senate and knows the levers he can use with a guy like Manchin, Joe's senate experience will serve him well for the next couple of years.
 

Fogdog

Well-Known Member
Finally, some intelligence running things. It’s amazing considering the place we came from. That horrible orange planet of Donald Trump. Wasn’t that painful? Thank god it’s over!!
Thank god it's over!

Trump is out of office and their only path back into office is through excluding voters.

Trump: "Votes don't count unless they are for me"

Biden: "Let the people's vote decide who should lead"

 

DIY-HP-LED

Well-Known Member

DIY-HP-LED

Well-Known Member
Steve Rattner: How Biden's Bill Differs From Trump's Tax Cut

Morning Joe economic analyst Steve Rattner joins Morning Joe to discuss President Biden's $1.9T relief bill, and he compares it to Trump's Tax Cut and Jobs Act and why he says Biden's plan will have an enormous impact on Americans who are in need.
 

DIY-HP-LED

Well-Known Member
‘Pinching Myself’: Nobel Prize-Winning Economist On Scale Of Covid Relief Bill

“I’m pinching myself wondering if this is some kind of dream, because we really are responding more or less adequately to the crisis at hand,” says Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman on the Covid relief bill.
 

DIY-HP-LED

Well-Known Member
Covid Relief: What's In The Bill, And Why The ‘Working Class’ Party Won't Back It

"The Republican rhetoric around standing for the working class is just not reflected in policy. That's why Republicans would rather talk about Dr. Seuss and try to stoke culture wars," says Chris Hayes of the "game-changing" Covid relief bill that passed without any GOP support.
 

hanimmal

Well-Known Member
https://apnews.com/article/joe-biden-first-50-days-key-promises-d40e38b8125d1ab2b98661c9ba919238
Screen Shot 2021-03-10 at 6.24.23 PM.png
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden laid out an ambitious agenda for his first 100 days in office, promising swift action on everything from climate change to immigration reform to the coronavirus pandemic.

On his 50th day in office, on Wednesday, his administration celebrated a milestone: congressional passage of his massive $1.9 trillion coronavirus aid package. The bill includes direct payments to millions of Americans and money to help the White House deliver on a number of Biden’s biggest campaign promises, like reopening schools and getting more Americans vaccinated.

Fifty days in, Biden has made major strides on a number of key campaign pledges for his earliest days in office, while others are still awaiting action. Where he stands on some of his major promises:
Screen Shot 2021-03-10 at 6.23.53 PM.pngScreen Shot 2021-03-10 at 6.23.23 PM.pngScreen Shot 2021-03-10 at 6.23.39 PM.png

COMPLETED GOALS

Biden prioritized addressing the coronavirus pandemic during his first weeks in office, and the focus has paid off. He’s on pace to hit his goal of 100 million vaccine doses administered in his first 100 days as soon as the end of next week. The daily rate of vaccinations now averages more than 2 million shots, and more than 75 million doses have been administered since Biden was sworn in.

Biden also took took several early actions that fulfilled pledges on climate policy. He signed an executive order on Inauguration Day that revoked the permit for the Keystone XL oil pipeline, halted development of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and ordered the review of Trump-era rules on the environment, public health and science. A Jan. 27 executive order halted new oil and gas leases on federal lands and offshore waters.

Biden also easily delivered on top campaign pledges that involved rolling back Trump administration moves on everything from climate change to immigration. Early on, the Biden administration rejoined the World Health Organization and the Paris Climate Accord, halted construction of the border wall, ended travel restrictions on people from a variety of Muslim-majority countries and created a task force to reunite families separated at the U.S.-Mexico border.

MORE STORIES:
On immigration, Biden pledged to deliver a comprehensive reform bill to Congress within his first 100 days, and it was unveiled last month, although Biden already has signaled an openness to a piece-by-piece approach if necessary. Biden also issued an executive order directing the Homeland Security secretary to “preserve and fortify” protections for young immigrants brought to the U.S. by their parents.

Biden also made some early moves to deliver on a pledge to tighten ethical standards in his administration, including a Jan. 20 executive order imposing an ethics pledge on appointees governing activities such as lobbying and taking gifts, which included prohibiting political interference in the Justice Department.

IN PROGRESS

Still other Biden promises remain a work in progress.

Biden’s national COVID-19 strategy pledged to establish 100 new, federally supported vaccination centers across the nation by the end of February. So far, the administration is at about 20 mass vaccination sites run end-to-end by the federal government and staffed by active-duty troops deployed by the Pentagon. Overall, the administration says, at least 441 vaccination sites are now federally supported. Many of those were not new sites, but nearly all have expanded capacity with the additional federal resources.

On immigration, Biden pledged to reverse the “public charge” rule put in place by the Trump administration to discourage immigrants from using public benefits, to streamline the naturalization process and to reform the U.S. asylum system within his first 100 days. An executive order he signed in early February directs the relevant agencies to review those policies and recommend changes within 60 days.

The administration has made some moves to reform the asylum system, including a move by the Department of Homeland Security on Biden’s first day in office to suspend a Trump-era program requiring asylum seekers to wait in Mexico while their claims were under review. But Biden has yet to articulate a plan to manage asylum flows beyond proposing that billions of dollars be spent to address root causes in Central America.

Full Coverage: Politics
The president has also kept in place pandemic-related powers that allow his administration to immediately expel people at the border without an opportunity to seek asylum. Biden aides have said they have no immediate plans to end the authority, which Trump introduced a year ago using an obscure 1944 public health law.

Biden also promised to end the long-term detention of migrant families. Immigration and Customs Enforcement signaled last week it plans to discontinue the use of one such facility, but ICE will continue to hold families for three days or less at two other facilities in Texas. And the Biden administration is expanding capacity at a number of long-term facilities that hold immigrant children, to address an ongoing surge of unaccompanied minors at the border.

On climate change, Biden pledged to establish enforceable commitments from other nations to reduce emissions in global shipping and aviation and to convene a climate world summit to discuss new and more ambitious pledges to address climate change, within his first 100 days. The U.S. will hold such a summit on April 22, Earth Day.

Reopening America’s schools is one of Biden’s major campaign promises that’s proven tougher to execute, in part because the decision on whether to return to in-person learning is left up to local officials and teachers’ unions. After some back-and-forth over the details of his goal, Biden said last month that his 100-day mission was to have most elementary schools open five days a week for in-person learning.

This month he directed states to prioritize vaccinating teachers and announced he was directing federal resources toward vaccinating teachers in March. The Biden administration hopes that with the passage of the coronavirus relief bill and distribution of millions in aid for schools to improve safety measures, teachers will feel more comfortable returning to in-person learning.

According to Burbio, which tracks school reopening plans, about 47% of kindergarten through 12th grade students have access to in-person school every weekday.

AWAITING ACTION

The Biden administration has yet to take significant action on criminal justice reform, aside from an executive order terminating private prison contracts. Biden pledged to set up a police oversight board within his first 100 days, but there’s been no clear movement in that direction so far.

Other 100-day pledges also awaiting movement: creating a Cabinet-level working group focused on promoting union participation, and ordering an FBI review of issues with gun purchase background checks.

Some of Biden’s 100-day pledges will require congressional action, like his promise to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act and increase taxes on corporations. Biden also promised to make passage of the Equality Act, which bars discrimination on the basis of sex, sexual orientation and gender identity, a priority in his first 100 days. That bill has passed the House but not the Senate.

And some of his promises are waiting on Biden’s Cabinet secretaries to be confirmed by the Senate. On gun control, Biden has said he would direct his attorney general to deliver recommendations to restructure key Justice Department agencies to more effectively enforce the nation’s gun laws. He also pledged to have his secretary of Housing and Urban Development lead a task force to create recommendations for making housing a right for all Americans.

Both his attorney general nominee, Merrick Garland, and his nominee to lead the Housing Department, Rep. Marcia Fudge, won confirmation Wednesday.
 

DIY-HP-LED

Well-Known Member
I think the filibuster should include tests of endurance like drinking games and electric nipple clamps.
Make it an "ordeal", they gotta really believe! Perhaps give their oration while siting on a sharpened spike to encourage brevity. :lol:
 

MICHI-CAN

Well-Known Member
If that's your idea of discussion, we can wait fifty more days.
We have been discussing since before the Revolutionary War. America of course. Still playing the same game with catchier terms and distractions. Have a discussion with your elected officials. Join the caucus in your area of your choosing. Join. Go to town hall and council meetings and discuss. Run for dog catcher in your county. Just quit talking until you do some thing to actually help. I do my part.
 
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