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Having an issue with my chiller not turning off.

Discussion in 'Hydroponics / Aeroponics' started by Airwalker16, Nov 5, 2017.

  1.  
    Airwalker16

    Airwalker16 Well-Known Member

  2.  
    dstroy

    dstroy Well-Known Member

    They are the same 250vac 10a 50-60hz

    Yes, you would cut the pin to match the one you desolder.
     
  3.  
    Airwalker16

    Airwalker16 Well-Known Member

  4.  
    Airwalker16

    Airwalker16 Well-Known Member

    SO the 125 & 28V are fine because they’re here higher than 120 & 24?
     
  5.  
    dstroy

    dstroy Well-Known Member

    The coil is 12vdc, and the contacts are rated for up to 250vac 10a 50-60hz. It is a direct replacement, different manufacturer.

    It’s super simple to replace, just desolder the old one, cut the pin on the new one to match the old one and then solder the new one on.
     
    Airwalker16 likes this.
  6.  
    Airwalker16

    Airwalker16 Well-Known Member

    OK can you determine which relay it is?
     
  7.  
    dstroy

    dstroy Well-Known Member

    You can find out which relay it is. Follow the trace on the pcb back from the wire that goes to the compressor/fan. Whichever relay that trace goes to is the one to replace.
     
  8.  
    Airwalker16

    Airwalker16 Well-Known Member

    And just use solder wick?
     
  9.  
    dstroy

    dstroy Well-Known Member

    Yes.
    When you are done it is very important that the trace with the extra solder on it still has extra solder on it. The reason it is there is to increase the current capacity of the trace and it is necessary in this application.
     
    Airwalker16 likes this.
  10.  
    Airwalker16

    Airwalker16 Well-Known Member

    So if RED is Cool the its the relay nearest the thermistor connection? 2017-12-03 05.30.30.jpg 20171201_101002.jpg you'll need a straight on pic for the traces to know huh...
     
  11.  
    Airwalker16

    Airwalker16 Well-Known Member

  12.  
    dstroy

    dstroy Well-Known Member

  13.  
    Airwalker16

    Airwalker16 Well-Known Member

    Omg thank you so much dstroy.... I’m so so SO happy I figured it out.
     
  14.  
    Jypsy Dog

    Jypsy Dog Well-Known Member

    [​IMG]
     
  15.  
    Airwalker16

    Airwalker16 Well-Known Member

    Nice google image search there.
     
  16.  
    Airwalker16

    Airwalker16 Well-Known Member

    Relays have been ordered along with solder wick. I’ll update this when I get them. Thanks again @dstroy
    @HydroRed I figured it out!!!
     
    HydroRed likes this.
  17.  
    Airwalker16

    Airwalker16 Well-Known Member

    @dstroy I have a question for you. I understand how this relay circuitry works a little bit better now. But my question is where the solder joint that is very thick is connected to both commons on the relays, when power is applied to them and the coil is energized to pull the normally open arms to closed, how does each relay get turned on independently when the commons are connected?
     
  18.  
    dstroy

    dstroy Well-Known Member

    You just asked why a switch is a switch. Because it does what it is.

    They share a common “supply”, which is AC mains voltage and what is being “switched”, not the 12vdc that actuates the relay. The 12vdc is probably stepped down by that regulator to 5vdc or 3.3vdc which goes to the micro controller and the micro controller has a separate output pin for each circuit it controls. In this case there are two output pins that control relays. All of the stuff that runs on DC voltage shares a common ground, which is not the same as an AC “ground”.
     
    Airwalker16 likes this.

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