South African Outdoor Growers 2020

I have never grown cannabis; apart from tossing a few seeds in my garden, and hoping for the best. This year I decided to make use of the quagmire in the South African legal system; our fantastic climate; and I tried to apply some of my knowledge in the commercial timber farming industry. I decided to have 1 meter deep beds dug in my garden and covered the entire area with bird-netting to protect the trees from hail. My Dad (on whom's farm I work) prescribed some 100% organic fertilizer that I applied a few times at erratic intervals. To my utter surprise - I have 3 meter (about 9ft) monsters in my garden - with no idea how I am going to get it all clipped!!!
I have attached a picture of one.
I was I bit uncertain regarding the strain, but my mate cleared it up for me a moment ago. Gorilla Glue x Gelato 69; I purchased these seed as "S1" cfrom the said mate; who used feminized Gorilla Glue seed from "Biltong and Budz" and fminized pollen from "Holy Seeds".

IF ANYONE CAN RECOMMEND WHERE I CAN BUY A CLIPPING MACHINE LOCALLY - PLEASE SHARE. I have 14 trees and they have all started flowering....
 

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xtsho

Well-Known Member
Nice looking plant :clap:

Have you thought about growing some of the native strains to that area? There are some great genetics that come from Africa.
 
Nice looking plant :clap:

Have you thought about growing some of the native strains to that area? There are some great genetics that come from Africa.
I must say I have not. It is ironic how land-race/local African strains have gained a bad reputation. The bottom-line is that we Africans have fully embraced the more potent American and European made strains. Have a look at; if you have not already; this video:
The said video gave me a good idea of the evolution popular strains in my area. - I must say that they are full of shit on the exact price at which the bud is sold; nonetheless in my 15 years experience as an avid fan of fine outdoor bud (I frequent Swaziland as I a live about 30 mins from the border); the local bud is worth a fraction of the American and European developed genetics. Top Quality bud in Swaziland today costs the equivalent of $330/kilogram local strains like Malawi Cob; Swazi; Durban Poison which you can get for around $80 - $100 US.
The attached pic is what I am currently smoking from Swaziland (out of season).
 

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xtsho

Well-Known Member
I must say I have not. It is ironic how land-race/local African strains have gained a bad reputation. The bottom-line is that we Africans have fully embraced the more potent American and European made strains. Have a look at; if you have not already; this video:
The said video gave me a good idea of the evolution popular strains in my area. - I must say that they are full of shit on the exact price at which the bud is sold; nonetheless in my 15 years experience as an avid fan of fine outdoor bud (I frequent Swaziland as I a live about 30 mins from the border); the local bud is worth a fraction of the American and European developed genetics. Top Quality bud in Swaziland today costs the equivalent of $330/kilogram local strains like Malawi Cob; Swazi; Durban Poison which you can get for around $80 - $100 US.
The attached pic is what I am currently smoking from Swaziland (out of season).
Many of those American and European genetics have Durban in their lineage. Durban Poison along with other African strains such as Malawi are finding a resurgence among a growing number of growers here in the United States. I haven't heard anything about African strains having a bad reputation but if they do it's unwarranted and it's too bad that you're local genetics will eventually disappear due to the introduction of hybrids into the region. I think the preservation of landrace genetics from around the world is important to the future of cannabis in order to maintain genetic diversity. Pretty soon everything will all be the same and indistinguishable from each other. I liken it to buying a banana's here in the United States. Apart from a few varieties available at Asian and other ethnic markets 99% of all bananas are the Cavendish variety. And that's too bad because there are so many other varieties of bananas. But just like with cannabis growers, banana farmers around the world plant what brings in the most profit. In the end the consumer ends up missing out on the flavors and different characteristics each variety has.

I find most of today's cannabis hybrids boring and similar. To me they lack the uniqueness a landrace strain can have. They might have a high THC percentage but they have lost other aspects that old school cannabis has. But the market follows the consumer and I'm obviously in the minority. Fortunately for myself and other like minded growers we can choose what varieties to grow. I have numerous African strains and the same with South America, India, Afghanistan/Pakistan, and many other landraces from around the world.
 
Many of those American and European genetics have Durban in their lineage. Durban Poison along with other African strains such as Malawi are finding a resurgence among a growing number of growers here in the United States. I haven't heard anything about African strains having a bad reputation but if they do it's unwarranted and it's too bad that you're local genetics will eventually disappear due to the introduction of hybrids into the region. I think the preservation of landrace genetics from around the world is important to the future of cannabis in order to maintain genetic diversity. Pretty soon everything will all be the same and indistinguishable from each other. I liken it to buying a banana's here in the United States. Apart from a few varieties available at Asian and other ethnic markets 99% of all bananas are the Cavendish variety. And that's too bad because there are so many other varieties of bananas. But just like with cannabis growers, banana farmers around the world plant what brings in the most profit. In the end the consumer ends up missing out on the flavors and different characteristics each variety has.

I find most of today's cannabis hybrids boring and similar. To me they lack the uniqueness a landrace strain can have. They might have a high THC percentage but they have lost other aspects that old school cannabis has. But the market follows the consumer and I'm obviously in the minority. Fortunately for myself and other like minded growers we can choose what varieties to grow. I have numerous African strains and the same with South America, India, Afghanistan/Pakistan, and many other landraces from around the world.
May I ask where you source your African and Pakistani strains from? I am always interested in building up my little "seed-bank".
 

xtsho

Well-Known Member
May I ask where you source your African and Pakistani strains from? I am always interested in building up my little "seed-bank".
I've gotten my seeds from multiple breeders/seed banks but the primary ones are ACE seeds, The Real Seed Company which has nothing but landrace strains, Tropical Seed Company, and some other stuff from Cannabiogen.

I have to say that the Strain Hunters video you posted would be a dream vacation. I'd like to travel to regions in Africa and Southeast Asia to get seeds from the source. But as much as I'd like to do the same in Pakistan and Afghanistan there is no way this American is going to that part of the world. My life is worth more to me than some cannabis seeds. Maybe India though as there is much diversity in the landrace cannabis in India and the level of safety for foreign travelers is much higher. Fortunately The Real Seed Company has a significant amount of offerings from that region. :blsmoke:
 
The political regime in Swaziland is an oppressive dictatorship (it is one of the only absolute monarch countries in the world; the king controls everything with an iron fist -media; legislation; treasury ; executive ect...
The one thin the king cannot control is the legalization of cannabis - it is common knowledge in Swaziland that the King commands absolute respect but should he legalize it the corporations will take over; leaving the masses with little to nothing to show for it -which would inevitably lead to his Majesty's downfall.
In a nut shell - this plant does not only have medicinal value; in Africa it has the power to overthrow tyrants and if manged to the benefit of our local communities it can play a massive role in the prosperity of this beautiful continent. NKOSI SIKELEL' AFRICA!
 
Thought I would post some pictures of the garden's progress.... the smells in there are indescribably good :hump:
 

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radiant Rudy

Well-Known Member
Im not from ZA but i was just there for a month. I def smoked my share of 'swazi' while visiting. I brought back a few seeds that i am going to try outdoors in about 6 weeks. Im @40°N. I hope to post up some pics late spring

The swazi i smoked there was so poorly dried, cured and packaged that i wondered if just better culture and handling might transform it. I heard that even the swazi that was available in and around capetown was possinly hybridized with random commercial plants grown outdoors in the area.

South Aftica is a crazy beautiful place, even without dagga
 
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Im not from ZA but i was just there for a month. I def smoked my share of 'swazi' while visiting. I brought back a few seeds that i am going to try outdoors in about 6 weeks. Im @40°N. I hope to post up some pics late spring

The swazi i smoked there was so poorly dried, cured and packaged that i wondered if just better culture and handling might transform it. I heard that even the swazi that was available in and around capetown was possinly hybridized with random commercial plants grown outdoors in the area.

South Aftica is a crazy beautiful place, even without dagga
You are 100% right regarding the drying and curing of the local bud - usually it is clipped (wet) and hung to dry (while the clipped buds are still on the stalk).

To find genuine Swazi bud is a mission in itself - this is because, about 10 years ago the South African Police Services engaged in an extensive "dagga elimination" project where they used helicopter and planes to ID grows and then spayed them.
Further, local growers prefer the American and European strains as they bring in a lot more money. I am often in Swaziland, and I know that good Swazi sells for as little as $50 on a kilogram; whereas the first and second generation US and European strains sell currently at about $300 per kilo. The local Swazi farmers achieve amazing results with their grows, despite the total lack of funds; facilities and often with very diluted strain all while trying to keep the law of their asses.

Please post pictures of your grow.... interested to see what comes out - Good luck
 
I was standing around admiring these big boys today.... hope to get some massive buds :weed:
GG x Harikiri_09 March 2020 (1).jpegGG x Harikiri_09 March 2020 (2).jpegGG x Harikir bud_09 March 2020 (1).jpegGG x Harikir bud_09 March 2020 (2).jpeg
Seems to me like it still has a long time to go before harvest; but to be honest I am not 100% sure.
 
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