On this day:

Discussion in 'Toke N Talk' started by Singlemalt, Apr 14, 2018.

  1.  
    NrthrnMichigan

    NrthrnMichigan Well-Known Member

    May 9 1964, Chuck Berry began his first ever UK tour at The Astoria Theatre, London, supported by The Animals, The Swinging Blue Jeans, Karl Denver and the Nashville Teens.


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    May 9 1964, Louis Armstrong went to No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Hello Dolly' making him the oldest artist to hit No.1 at the age of 62. In 2011, 85 year-old Tony Bennett broke this record when his Duets album topped the US album chart.




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    BarnBuster

    BarnBuster Virtually Unknown Member

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    On this day in 1869, the presidents of the Union Pacific and Central Pacific railroads meet in Promontory, Utah, and drive a ceremonial last spike into a rail line that connects their railroads. This made transcontinental railroad travel possible for the first time in U.S. history. No longer would western-bound travelers need to take the long and dangerous journey by wagon train, and the West would surely lose some of its wild charm with the new connection to the civilized East.
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2018
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    BarnBuster

    BarnBuster Virtually Unknown Member

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    "On this day in 1934, a massive storm sends millions of tons of topsoil flying from across the parched Great Plains region of the United States as far east as New York, Boston and Atlanta.

    At the time the Great Plains were settled in the mid-1800s, the land was covered by prairie grass, which held moisture in the earth and kept most of the soil from blowing away even during dry spells. By the early 20th century, however, farmers had plowed under much of the grass to create fields. The U.S. entry into World War I in 1917 caused a great need for wheat, and farms began to push their fields to the limit, plowing under more and more grassland with the newly invented tractor. The plowing continued after the war, when the introduction of even more powerful gasoline tractors sped up the process. During the 1920s, wheat production increased by 300 percent, causing a glut in the market by 1931.

    That year, a severe drought spread across the region. As crops died, wind began to carry dust from the over-plowed and over-grazed lands. The number of dust storms reported jumped from 14 in 1932 to 28 in 1933. The following year, the storms decreased in frequency but increased in intensity, culminating in the most severe storm yet in May 1934. Over a period of two days, high-level winds caught and carried some 350 million tons of silt all the way from the northern Great Plains to the eastern seaboard. According to The New York Times, dust “lodged itself in the eyes and throats of weeping and coughing New Yorkers,” and even ships some 300 miles offshore saw dust collect on their decks.

    The dust storms forced thousands of families from Texas, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Colorado, Kansas and New Mexico to uproot and migrate to California, where they were derisively known as “Okies”–no matter which state they were from. These transplants found life out West not much easier than what they had left, as work was scarce and pay meager during the worst years of the Great Depression"


    https://www.thebalance.com/what-was-the-dust-bowl-causes-and-effects-3305689
    https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/2014GL061661
    https://livinghistoryfarm.org/farminginthe30s/farminginthe1930s.html
     
  4.  
    BarnBuster

    BarnBuster Virtually Unknown Member


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    May 13, 1607 Some 100 English colonists arrive along the west bank of the James River in Virginia to found Jamestown, the first permanent English settlement in North America. Dispatched from England by the London Company, the colonists had sailed across the Atlantic aboard the Susan Constant, Godspeed, and Discovery.

    Upon landing at Jamestown, the first colonial council was held by seven settlers whose names had been chosen and placed in a sealed box by King James I. The council, which included Captain John Smith, an English adventurer, chose Edward Wingfield as its first president. After only two weeks, Jamestown came under attack from warriors from the local Algonquian Native American confederacy, but the Indians were repulsed by the armed settlers. In December of the same year, John Smith and two other colonists were captured by Algonquians while searching for provisions in the Virginia wilderness. His companions were killed, but he was spared, according to a later account by Smith, because of the intercession of Pocahontas, Chief Powhatan’s daughter.

    During the next two years, disease, starvation, and more Native American attacks wiped out most of the colony, but the London Company continually sent more settlers and supplies. The severe winter of 1609 to 1610, which the colonists referred to as the “starving time,” killed most of the Jamestown colonists, leading the survivors to plan a return to England in the spring. However, on June 10, Thomas West De La Warr, the newly appointed governor of Virginia, arrived with supplies and convinced the settlers to remain at Jamestown. In 1612, John Rolfe cultivated the first tobacco at Jamestown, introducing a successful source of livelihood. On April 5, 1614, Rolfe married Pocahontas, thus assuring a temporary peace with Chief Powhatan.

    The death of Powhatan in 1618 brought about a resumption of conflict with the Algonquians, including an attack led by Chief Opechancanough in 1622 that nearly wiped out the settlement. The English engaged in violent reprisals against the Algonquians, but there was no further large-scale fighting until 1644, when Opechancanough led his last uprising and was captured and executed at Jamestown. In 1646, the Algonquian Confederacy agreed to give up much of its territory to the rapidly expanding colony, and, beginning in 1665, its chiefs were appointed by the governor of Virginia.
     
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    BarnBuster

    BarnBuster Virtually Unknown Member

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    On May 14, 1796, Jenner took fluid from a cowpox blister and scratched it into the skin of James Phipps, an eight-year-old boy
    . A single blister rose up on the spot, but James soon recovered. On July 1, Jenner inoculated the boy again, this time with smallpox matter, and no disease developed. The vaccine was a success. Doctors all over Europe soon adopted Jenner’s innovative technique, leading to a drastic decline in new sufferers of the devastating disease.

    In the 19th and 20th centuries, scientists following Jenner’s model developed new vaccines to fight numerous deadly diseases, including polio, whooping cough, measles, tetanus, yellow fever, typhus, and hepatitis B, and many others. More sophisticated smallpox vaccines were also developed and by 1970 international vaccination programs, such as those undertaken by the World Health Organization, had eliminated smallpox worldwide.
     
  6.  
    Roger A. Shrubber

    Roger A. Shrubber Well-Known Member

    may 14th 1973, Skylab is launched.
    the first "space station" is used for 6 years before its orbit decays and it crashes into australia.......no koalas were harmed
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2018
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    Singlemalt

    Singlemalt Well-Known Member

    May 14 1998 Frank Sinatra died
     
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    BarnBuster

    BarnBuster Virtually Unknown Member

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    May 15, 1963Gordon Cooper is launched into space aboard Faith 7 on the longest American space mission to that date. Faith 7 was the capstone of Project Mercury, the NASA program that put the first American into space in 1961 and the first astronaut into orbit in 1962. Cooper completed 22 orbits of the earth and spent 34 hours in space. He was the first American astronaut to spend more than a day in space. On the afternoon of May 16, Faith 7 landed safely in the Pacific Ocean, four miles from the recovery ship Kearsarge. Cooper was honored by parades in Hawaii and Washington, D.C., where he addressed a joint session of Congress, and in New York City, where he was greeted by a massive ticker-tape crowd. Later Shawnee, Oklahoma–Cooper’s hometown–celebrated the return of the sixth Mercury astronaut from space.

    Toward the end of the Faith 7 flight, there were mission-threatening technical problems. During the 19th orbit, the capsule had a power failure. Carbon dioxide levels began rising, and the cabin temperature jumped to over 100 degrees Fahrenheit.

    Cooper fell back on his understanding of star patterns, took manual control of the tiny capsule and successfully estimated the correct pitch for re-entry into the atmosphere. Some precision was needed in the calculation, since if the capsule came in too steep, g-forces would be too large, and if its trajectory were too shallow, it would shoot out of the atmosphere again, back into space.

    Cooper drew lines on the capsule window to help him check his orientation before firing the re-entry rockets.

    “So I used my wrist watch for time,” he later recalled, “my eyeballs out the window for attitude. Then I fired my retrorockets at the right time and landed right by the carrier.”

    Cooper’s cool-headed performance and piloting skills led to a basic rethinking of design philosophy for later space missions.

    After his death, former U.S. Senator John Glenn said, “There are thousands of memories from our early space days. Gordo was one of the most straightforward people I have ever known. What you saw was what you got. Pride in doing a great job, whatever his assignment, was his hallmark. You could always depend on Gordo. It’s hard to believe that he will no longer be with us in person. I know he’ll be with us in spirit.”

     
  9.  
    tangerinegreen555

    tangerinegreen555 Well-Known Member

  10.  
    Singlemalt

    Singlemalt Well-Known Member

    On this memorable day in the year of our Lord 2016, May 16 (12:13 am ET); the esteemed and revered @mr sunshine created this sanctified thread that we may blessed

    https://www.rollitup.org/t/random-jabber-jibber-thread.909369/

    "
    I had this vision in my head, a place where anyone can say whatever they want. Fuck topics and staying on them.


    I'll get things kicking.


    I'm sitting on my toilet making a thread as I take a shit and rub my finger in between my head and my forskin and smelling it every once in awhile. It smells like a camp fire.



    Now you go."

    Hosanna, we thank thee and embrace thee @mr sunshine, blessings be upon him


     
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  11.  
    BarnBuster

    BarnBuster Virtually Unknown Member

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    This photo, officially released in Moscow in 1960, shows the Russian people viewing the wreckage of a US U-2 reconnaissance plane shot down over Soviet territory on May 1st
    May 16, 1960 In the wake of the Soviet downing of an American U-2 spy plane on May 1, Russian leader Nikita Khrushchev lashes out at the United States and President Dwight D. Eisenhower at a Paris summit meeting between the two heads of state. Khrushchev’s outburst angered Eisenhower and doomed any chances for successful talks or negotiations at the summit.

    On May 1, 1960, the Soviets shot down a CIA spy plane and captured the pilot, Gary Francis Powers. The United States issued public denials that the aircraft was being used for espionage, claiming instead that it was merely a weather plane that had veered off course. The Soviets thereupon triumphantly produced Powers, large pieces of wreckage from the plane, and Powers’ admission that he was working for the CIA. The incident was a public relations fiasco for Eisenhower, who was forced to admit that the plane had indeed been spying on Russia.

    Tensions from the incident were still high when Eisenhower and Khrushchev arrived in Paris to begin a summit meeting on May 16. Khrushchev wasted no time in tearing into the United States, declaring that Eisenhower would not be welcome in Russia during his scheduled visit to the Soviet Union in June. He condemned the “inadmissible, provocative actions” of the United States in sending the spy plane over the Soviet Union, and demanded that Eisenhower ban future flights and punish those responsible for this “deliberate violation of the Soviet Union.” When Eisenhower agreed only to a “suspension” of the spy plane flights, Khrushchev left the meeting in a huff. According to U.S. officials, the president was “furious” at Khrushchev for his public dressing-down of the United States. The summit meeting officially adjourned the next day with no further meetings between Khrushchev and Eisenhower. Eisenhower’s planned trip to Moscow in June was scrapped.

    The collapse of the May 1960 summit meeting was a crushing blow to those in the Soviet Union and the United States who believed that a period of “peaceful coexistence” between the two superpowers was on the horizon. During the previous few years, both Eisenhower and Khrushchev had publicly indicated their desire for an easing of Cold War tensions, but the spy plane incident put an end to such talk, at least for the time being.

    https://www.cia.gov/library/center-...ional-estimates-collected-essays/8summit.html
     
  12.  
    BudmanTX

    BudmanTX Well-Known Member

  13.  
    BarnBuster

    BarnBuster Virtually Unknown Member

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    Brown v. Board of Ed is decided

    May 17, 1954 In a major civil rights victory, the U.S. Supreme Court hands down an unanimous decision in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, ruling that racial segregation in public educational facilities is unconstitutional. The historic decision, which brought an end to federal tolerance of racial segregation, specifically dealt with Linda Brown, a young African American girl who had been denied admission to her local elementary school in Topeka, Kansas, because of the color of her skin.

    In 1896, the Supreme Court ruled in Plessy v. Ferguson that “separate but equal” accommodations in railroad cars conformed to the 14th Amendment’s guarantee of equal protection. That ruling was used to justify segregating all public facilities, including elementary schools. However, in the case of Linda Brown, the white school she attempted to attend was far superior to her black alternative and miles closer to her home. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) took up Linda’s cause, and in 1954 Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka reached the Supreme Court. African American lawyer (and future Supreme Court justice) Thurgood Marshall led Brown’s legal team, and on May 17, 1954, the high court handed down its decision.

    In an opinion written by Chief Justice Earl Warren, the nation’s highest court ruled that not only was the “separate but equal” doctrine unconstitutional in Linda’s case, it was unconstitutional in all cases because educational segregation stamped an inherent badge of inferiority on African American students. A year later, after hearing arguments on the implementation of their ruling, the Supreme Court published guidelines requiring public school systems to integrate “with all deliberate speed.”

    The Brown v. Board of Education decision served to greatly motivate the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s and ultimately led to the abolishment of racial segregation in all public facilities and accommodations.
     
  14.  
    Roger A. Shrubber

    Roger A. Shrubber Well-Known Member

    may 17th, 1970, Thor Heyerdahl and a multinational crew set out in the RA2, a papyrus boat built in the style of the ancient egyptians.
    they made the 4000 mile crossing from morocco to barbados in 57 days. Heyerdahl was an ethnologist who was trying to prove that Egyptians could have sailed to the americas in ancient time, and had trade with the natives. he never proved that conclusively, but he certainly proved it was possible.
     
  15.  
    BarnBuster

    BarnBuster Virtually Unknown Member

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    Last edited: May 18, 2018 at 12:41 AM
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    mr sunshine

    mr sunshine Well-Known Member

    may 18, 2018... Another white boy shoots up a school an kill's 10. White people have the worst kids.
     
  17.  
    curious2garden

    curious2garden Well-Known Member

    They need more BBQ in their lives, give them a reason to live, or tacos, those are pretty good too.
     
  18.  
    BarnBuster

    BarnBuster Virtually Unknown Member

    Supreme Court upholds gay rights, May 20, 1996

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    On this day in 1996, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down an amendment to Colorado’s state constitution that would have barred any jurisdiction in the state from taking any action that would protect homosexual rights. The high tribunal’s 6-3 decision marked a major victory for the gay and lesbian civil rights movement.

    In 1992, Colorado voters held a special referendum that approved Amendment 2 with the support of 53.4 percent of voters. Four years later, the Supreme Court agreed to review its constitutionality in a case known as Romer v. Evans.

    The amendment had been promoted by a group that called itself Colorado for Family Values. If upheld, it would have nullified gay rights laws that were already in place in Denver, Aspen and Boulder.

    Writing for the majority, Justice Anthony Kennedy held that the change in the state’s constitution violated the equal-protection clause of the 14th Amendment. He rejected the state’s argument that Amendment 2 merely blocked gay people from receiving “special rights.” To the contrary, he found, “the amendment imposes a special disability upon those persons alone. Homosexuals are forbidden the safeguards that others enjoy or may seek without constraint.”

    Moreover, it was, as Kennedy put it, “at once too narrow and too broad. It identifies persons by a single trait and then denies them protection across the board. The resulting disqualification of a class of persons from the right to seek specific protection from the law is unprecedented in our jurisprudence.”


    In his dissent, Justice Antonin Scalia characterized the amendment as “a modest attempt by seemingly tolerant Coloradans to preserve traditional sexual mores against the efforts of a politically powerful minority to revise those mores through use of the laws.”

    In 2007, Colorado passed a law that banned discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity by all employers.
     
  19.  
    Roger A. Shrubber

    Roger A. Shrubber Well-Known Member

    05/20/1873, Levi Strauss and his partner, Jacob Davis, receive a patent for denim work pants with rivets reinforcing key points, and blue jeans are born
     
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    BarnBuster

    BarnBuster Virtually Unknown Member

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    May 21, 1881In Washington, D.C., humanitarians Clara Barton and Adolphus Solomons found the American National Red Cross, an organization established to provide humanitarian aid to victims of wars and natural disasters in congruence with the International Red Cross. Barton, born in Massachusetts in 1821, worked with the sick and wounded during the American Civil War and became known as the “Angel of the Battlefield” for her tireless dedication. In 1865, President Abraham Lincoln commissioned her to search for lost prisoners of war, and with the extensive records she had compiled during the war she succeeded in identifying thousands of the Union dead at the Andersonville prisoner-of-war camp. She was in Europe in 1870 when the Franco-Prussian War broke out, and she went behind the German lines to work for the International Red Cross. In 1873, she returned to the United States, and four years later she organized an American branch of the International Red Cross. The American Red Cross received its first U.S. federal charter in 1900. Barton headed the organization into her 80s and died in 1912.
     
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