Oh Hunter!

DIY-HP-LED

Well-Known Member
Do you have free speech in Canada, I mean is it a right?
I depends, about as much as in America, though we do have criminal liable laws as well as stricter liable laws, keeps folks honest. Even in America you are not allowed to shout fire in a crowded theater, that legal precedent is over a hundred years old. Free speech means you can publish or stand on a soap box, but there are practical limits and America will explore them in the coming years. As far as broadcast or the internet goes the government owns it and can regulate it as much as required, in Canada or America.
 
Last edited:

22elar

Well-Known Member
I depends, about as much as in America, though we do have criminal liable laws as wells as stricter liable laws, keeps folks honest. Even in America you are not allowed to shout fire in a crowded theater, that legal precedent is over a hundred years old. Free speech means you can publish or stand on a soap box, but there are practical limits and America will explore them in the coming years. As far as broadcast or the internet goes the government owns it and can regulate it as much as required, in Canada or America.
Hmmm, do you have an enshrined right to free speech.
 

DIY-HP-LED

Well-Known Member
Hmmm, do you have an enshrined right to free speech.
Freedom of speech is older than the US constitution and so are the legislative bodies of the 13 colonies who created and endorsed it. In the English world freedom democracy and free speech are standing traditions.


"Fundamental freedoms
Everyone in Canada is free to practise any religion or no religion at all. We are also free to express religious beliefs through prayer or by wearing religious clothing for example. However, the Charter also ensures that others also have the right to express their religious beliefs in public.

We’re free to think our own thoughts, speak our minds, listen to views of others and express our opinions in creative ways. We’re also free to meet with anyone we wish and participate in peaceful demonstrations. This includes the right to protest against a government action or institution.

"However, these freedoms are not unlimited. There may be limits on how you express your religious beliefs if your way of doing so would infringe on the rights of others or undermine complex public programs and policies. For example, you may have religious reasons to object having your photo taken for your driver’s license, but this requirement may be linked to a need to stop others from unlawfully using your identity. In addition, the Charter does not protect expression such as hate speech that involves threats of violence or that takes the form of violence.

The media also have certain fundamental freedoms, and are free to print and broadcast news and other information. The government can only limit what the media prints for justifiable reasons set out in law. For example, a magazine cannot print slander, which is an untrue statement about a person that may hurt his or her reputation".
 

22elar

Well-Known Member
Freedom of speech is older than the US constitution and so are the legislative bodies of the 13 colonies who created and endorsed it. In the English world freedom democracy and free speech are standing traditions.


"Fundamental freedoms
Everyone in Canada is free to practise any religion or no religion at all. We are also free to express religious beliefs through prayer or by wearing religious clothing for example. However, the Charter also ensures that others also have the right to express their religious beliefs in public.

We’re free to think our own thoughts, speak our minds, listen to views of others and express our opinions in creative ways. We’re also free to meet with anyone we wish and participate in peaceful demonstrations. This includes the right to protest against a government action or institution.

"However, these freedoms are not unlimited. There may be limits on how you express your religious beliefs if your way of doing so would infringe on the rights of others or undermine complex public programs and policies. For example, you may have religious reasons to object having your photo taken for your driver’s license, but this requirement may be linked to a need to stop others from unlawfully using your identity. In addition, the Charter does not protect expression such as hate speech that involves threats of violence or that takes the form of violence.

The media also have certain fundamental freedoms, and are free to print and broadcast news and other information. The government can only limit what the media prints for justifiable reasons set out in law. For example, a magazine cannot print slander, which is an untrue statement about a person that may hurt his or her reputation".
Is that the text of your Constitution? Seems pretty vague.
 
>
Top