Got 'em early this year...

Discussion in 'Outdoor Growing' started by Miyagismokes, Jun 13, 2018.

  1.  
    Miyagismokes

    Miyagismokes Well-Known Member

    Well, I can do all the pre-planning preventative measures I want, but it seems like my russet mite is quite permanent....
    The problem with my area is there's literally so many people growing, control of infestations permanently has become entirely impossible. At least I caught it early in veg.
    I was so busy scoping for russets that I missed some thrips setting up shop on my seedlings, too. I was 100x scoping and had a moment of "whoa, that's huge! ...wait, that's just a thrips"

    I would like to try sulfur as a control method, but I'm pretty sure it's already too hot to safely use, so back to the Organocide. Another year, another 5 gallons of fishy oil spray.
     

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  2.  
    trippnface

    trippnface Well-Known Member

    Hve you thought about purchasing predator mites?

    much cheaper than equal pesticides, and safer & more effective I think.

    https://www.arbico-organics.com/pro...killer/beneficial-insects-predators-parasites

    https://www.arbico-organics.com/pro...nhouse/beneficial-insects-predators-parasites


    thse guys slay thrips and white flies

    https://www.arbico-organics.com/pro...irskii/beneficial-insects-predators-parasites

    that sucks man I have luckily not had to deal with russets yet, you in nor cal or so oregon?
     
  3.  
    petert

    petert Well-Known Member

    I caught mine early last year too. It’s not just other growers. They can be brought in any number of ways.. they are everywhere. Birds, animals, other insects.
    I used wettable sulfur up to flowering ( cheap and effective) then switched to predator mights when flowering set in!
    I have a feeling I’ll be doing the same this year.
     
  4.  
    petert

    petert Well-Known Member

    Oh yeah. I’d spray very early AM or just before sun set. Leave it a day and follow up with a cold fresh water spray.
    The repeat at least once a week!
     
  5.  
    Miyagismokes

    Miyagismokes Well-Known Member

    It says not to use if temperatures exceed 85F... So it's only relevant when applying?
     
  6.  
    Miyagismokes

    Miyagismokes Well-Known Member

    I used predator mites as a preventative that does seem to stem the spread, but I do have a few plants with andersoni sachets that are showing damage... Can't expect them all to work, I guess. I doubt they're scoping and scooping a specific number to pack up, just some statistical average of mites per cc of vermiculite.

    I live in the Triangle.
     
  7.  
    petert

    petert Well-Known Member


    Yes. Your best time to spray is just before sunset. If you are concerned about residue and you have the time spray at night and cold water rinse in the AM.
    There are people who think they are a death curse. But you can beat them down! I did last year and had a good harvest. Two years ago they killed me because I had never had them before. Catch them early and they are manageable!
     
  8.  
    Miyagismokes

    Miyagismokes Well-Known Member

    Ah. Typical spray rules.
    I am grateful for seeing them in June rather than August, like last year.
    I used Organocide to keep them knocked down, but I never truly beat them.
    I've seen folks turn to some foul stuff to eradicate them-- Forbid 4f, Avid, Judo, even.... That shit's not even legal here, but easy to skip over to Oregon to pick it up....
     
  9.  
    Miyagismokes

    Miyagismokes Well-Known Member

    Ffs, got spiders in the clones now, too....
    Whatever. Doesn't change the fact I'm already spraying...
     
  10.  
    petert

    petert Well-Known Member

    Sulphur worked for me as well as GreenCleaner. It’s smothers the MFers!!
    When I get to the point I feel
    Uncomfortable spraying, like mid August I unleash the Andersoni whether i see them or not! They seem to stop the spread rather irradicate them..
    The other preventative I’d hope to try if I can get to the point of not having to spray is Green Lacewing larvae. They eat the shit out of spider mites, whiteflies and thrips. As they mature you can plant Dill, Fennel, cosmos and a bunch of other flowers to keep the adults around and laying their eggs in the cannabis.
     
  11.  
    Dmannn

    Dmannn Well-Known Member

    I have been dealing with unrelenting white flies. I have tried DE, neem, trifecta and insecticidal soap. Was recommended to this other stuff method 1-pps by a member on here, and gunna try tonight. If it doesn't work, and the plants start to suffer, i might have no choice to go to Tempo 1% powder and if all else fails Pyrethrum 1% powder. Not happy but, haven't lost all hope yet. I live in a small town surrounded by rice farms..not used to this area. I even was spraying early granted its not an all out infestation but, i am losing more fan leaves than i like right now.
     
  12.  
    Miyagismokes

    Miyagismokes Well-Known Member

    My small plants absolutely hate it, even at half strength. Organocide is less problem-causing for me.
     
  13.  
    Miyagismokes

    Miyagismokes Well-Known Member

    Wettable sulfur does indeed seem to work. The rooted clones (notoriously weak to oil sprays) where I first noticed my russet infection have had no crawlies after two applications a week apart, I will continue weekly for three more weeks to be sure, but no new damage has presented and the plants are perky as all fuck.
    It seems slightly less effective at thrip knockdown, maybe due to their highly evasive habits, but still successful.
    I'd already started a regimen of Organocide on my cabinet full of spider mites, but in a pinch I'll just toss them, I have more plants than I know what to do with, and it's part of the problem of keeping the bugs down...
    A half-strength spray from a hand pump every three days is keeping them down, but won't knock them out, of course.
    I'll probably switch to a full rotation of Organocide, spinosad, and neem for a more effective treatment.

    But sulfur, man. It does work. Only on contact, I'd wager....
     
    Dmannn likes this.
  14.  
    Oregon Grower

    Oregon Grower Well-Known Member

    Method 1 is good it’s mostly rosemary and mint oils smells like Vick’s vapor rub it’s all I use as a preventative and neem if I see anything trying to start also plenty of predator mites different mites for different occasions and get nematodes for soil
     
    Miyagismokes likes this.
  15.  
    Miyagismokes

    Miyagismokes Well-Known Member

    I've taken to lining my garden with mint and rosemary, but it hasn't taken yet...
     
    Oregon Grower likes this.
  16.  
    Miyagismokes

    Miyagismokes Well-Known Member

    Dangerous experiment #1--
    One clone infected with spider mites.

    Test-- top dress with rolling tobacco.

    Results-- no TMV symptoms.
    Spider mite presence reduced, not eliminated. Seemed to affect the juveniles most, their numbers reduced noticeably more than adults.

    Clone destroyed as potential viral vector.
     
  17.  
    too larry

    too larry Well-Known Member

    My BIL uses a synthetic nicotine poison for insects. It works really well. One of the side effects was he was smelling tobacco burning after he used it.
     
  18.  
    Miyagismokes

    Miyagismokes Well-Known Member

    That's sort of a problem with neonicotinids, they work a little too well...
     
  19.  
    too larry

    too larry Well-Known Member

    His main use is for livestock. This is the first time using it in the garden. He has worked with ag chemicals all his life, so he knows the risks.
     
  20.  
    Miyagismokes

    Miyagismokes Well-Known Member

    I....
    I think I beat 'em.

    I've NEVER BEATEN russets.
    Not planning on changing my routine, just to be sure.

    Now I just gotta knock down these spider mites and thrips....
    I've found that spider mites are pretty hardy against the wettable sulfur, and the thrips literally give zero fucks about sulfur, being an insect (I think).
    I've been continually surprised at how tough these spider mites are in the outdoors. I knew they were tough bastards indoors, but damn.
    'bout to go get some ladybugs....
     

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