From a person who doesnt know anything about this industry!

Discussion in 'Canadian Patients' started by gb123, Jun 13, 2018.

  1.  
    gb123

    gb123 Well-Known Member

    or understand it all(:

    Aphria CEO 'handcuffed' by proposed cannabis advertising laws, supports some Senate suggestions

    Vic Neufeld says advertising is the biggest barrier for his company going forward
    CBC News · Posted: Jun 13, 2018 2:43 PM ET | Last Updated: 25 minutes ago

    [​IMG]CEO of Leamington, Ont.-based Aphria cannabis Vic Neufeld was photographed in Toronto's Shangri-La hotel on Jan. 18, 2018. Neufeld feels his business is 'handcuffed' by the advertising laws around cannabis. (Evan Mitsui/CBCNews)
    As the bill that will introduce the legalization of cannabis in Canada gets noodled around in Ottawa, one marijuana mogul said there's only one major barrier he's watching.

    "One very simple one, and that's advertising."

    Vic Neufeld is the CEO of Aphria — one of Canada's largest cannabis producers with facilities located in Leamington, Ont. His company has been expanding its medicinal and recreational cannabis production abilities, so he's been watching closely as Bill C-45 makes its way through the Senate and back to the House.

    "I think what the Senate did in terms of allowing the provinces to decide was a very prudent amendment," Neufeld said, referring to a Senate amendment that would allow each province or territory to veto residents from growing their own plants.

    Quebec, Manitoba, and Nunavut have all expressed they would like to ban growing recreational cannabis in homes, but according to the House's order paper, the government plans to reject that Senate amendment.

    "If the province of Quebec wants to say 'No homegrown,' let them do it," said Neufeld. "They're the ones who are going to bear the cost and the enforcement of these rules."

    'Handcuffing' on advertising bad for business
    But as pot legalization moves forward, there's a big challenge Neufeld faces: the CEO believes cannabis advertising is being regulated more than tobacco or alcohol.

    "How do you differentiate your brand versus somebody else's brand when you can't convey messaging on key differences of quality, taste, or packaging?" he said. "The biggest obstacle to all licensed producers, not just Aphria, is the handcuffing placed on advertising."

    His company will fully support whatever the conclusions of bill C-45 are, said Neufeld, but he anticipates some producers will not adhere.

    "I'm concerned there's going to be a few that bend the line if not break it and what's the enforcement?" said Neufeld. "The consumers are going to be confused and it's not good."


    [​IMG]Aphria's marijuana production facility in Leamington, Ont. (Evan Mitsui/CBC)
    In March of this year, Health Canada revealed its proposed rules around cannabis branding, including restrictions on the colour of packaging and the depiction of branding, requirements for mandatory warning labels and a ban on packaging designed to appeal to young people.

    Another proposed Senate amendment would also ban branded promotional items such as T-shirts and hats that display logos of pot producers. However the federal government plans to ignore this, saying the bill already outlines strict regulations on advertising.

    "You should be proud of the brands that you are creating," Neufeld said.

    Ford's free market
    During the Ontario election campaign, Progressive Conservative Leader Doug Ford said he would be "open" to a free market of cannabis sales.

    "I don't believe in the government sticking their hands in our lives all the time. I believe in letting the market dictate," he told CBC Radio's Ottawa Morning in March.

    Neufeld said that campaign platform was based on premier-designate Ford's personal views and from the council around him.


    "If he wants to privatize he has to really walk forward carefully," said Neufeld. "Incoming premier Ford has to be very conscious of what could go wrong, it's easy to think of what could go right."

    Aphria is in favour of the LCBO model the Ontario Liberals introduced under Kathleen Wynne. Neufeld said the model allows for accountability in sales.

    "It's self-serving if licensed producers are part of privatization," he said. "Can a licensed producer like Aphria own the only dispensary in Windsor for example? Well if that's the case I'm going to make sure all of my products have ideal shelf presence,et cetera, which is not fair competition."
     
    OldMedUser likes this.
  2.  
    OldMedUser

    OldMedUser Well-Known Member

    Of course the prick wants the provinces to be able to scuttle home growing so he can sell more of his companies crap.

    Boo-hoo to not being able to advertise even tho I think it's ridiculous that all packaging all has to be the same. Are all beer or cigarette cartons the same?

    At least Ottawa is refusing to allow the amendment that allows provinces to veto home growing. Make them fight it out in court!

    :peace:
     
  3.  
    VIANARCHRIS

    VIANARCHRIS Well-Known Member

    What costs or enforcement are involved with home beer, wine and tobacco production? Why would cannabis be different?
    Fucking idiots.
     
  4.  
    The Hippy

    The Hippy Well-Known Member

    Fuck that cunt and his pesticide schwagg. Get ready to face reality ya jerg-off.
     
  5.  
    zoic

    zoic Well-Known Member

    For those who will actually choose to buy from retail stores, welcome to "The Grand Parade of Lifeless Packaging"
     
  6.  
    WHATFG

    WHATFG Well-Known Member

    Hmmm....how is that? There is no "recreational" cannabis yet.
    but isn't that what they wanted?....oh except the part where they can't advertise...
    Hahahahahahahahaha.....poor consumers eh?....lol...
     
  7.  
    Somatek

    Somatek Well-Known Member

    Canada is actually trying to pass plain packaging laws for tobacco, so that's in line with the position on tobacco. It straddles the line because of unproven fears about the danger of smoking pot. Personally I'm not gonna lose sleep over LP's & advertising. I am actively pushing for craft growers to be able to sell directly to customers, just like craft breweries as higher profits from direct sales are what make their business model viable.
     
  8.  
    VIANARCHRIS

    VIANARCHRIS Well-Known Member

    Thing is, it's a plant. There is no way one LP product will be distinguishable from another without packaging. I guess I'd be pissed if I was a craft grower wanting to establish a customer base, but as a consumer it won't matter, imo.
     
  9.  
    Somatek

    Somatek Well-Known Member

    The LP's have deep enough pockets that I'm fine leaving it to them. I agree the advertising is poorly thought out but it effects an industry that's exploiting past growers/breeders work for their profits.

    Like I said craft growers are a bigger concern, which is why I support direct sales. Hopefully the gov actually makes a reasonable law that creates a valid entry point.

    I think the people that will be buying legal pot off the bat will more likely be the causal smokers. I can't see regular tokers who smoke a quarter+ per week (minimum) start paying more for lower quality. They'll expect what craft growers produce, which I haven't seen from any LP. Until the legal market matches the blackmarkets price & quality, it'll continue to thrive.
     
  10.  
    gb123

    gb123 Well-Known Member

    ya see there, now yer makin sense (:

    There's more to it
     
    OldMedUser likes this.
  11.  
    The Hippy

    The Hippy Well-Known Member

    Fancy packages won't improve the crap inside. BOYCOTTING lp's weed is going to be SO much fun....I'm giddy
     
  12.  
    cannadan

    cannadan Well-Known Member

    will love the chance to do a critic..on that poison...matter of fact we should all do one critic or vlog on how we really feel about
    LP supplied ganja
    would be an interesting read.
     
    CalyxCrusher, gb123, GrowRock and 3 others like this.
  13.  
    TheRealDman

    TheRealDman Well-Known Member

    That would mean you have to smoke that shit...pass!
     
    zoic, WHATFG, gb123 and 1 other person like this.
  14.  
    gb123

    gb123 Well-Known Member

    Arrrrrrrr
     
  15.  
    cannadan

    cannadan Well-Known Member

    it could be a third party critic...you basically look at smell/ touch etc.....please do not ingest though....
    that would be foolhardy....
    though if your able to convince someone in the group to sample it....you can at least be there to call 911, in the event of an allergic reaction to some of the chemicals...used...lol
     
  16.  
    CalyxCrusher

    CalyxCrusher Well-Known Member

    It could be a new type of internet challenge like the cinnamon challenge or ice bucket challenge. Try and smoke a 1g LP doob without coughing
     
    cannadan, VIANARCHRIS and gb123 like this.
  17.  
    cannadan

    cannadan Well-Known Member

    the swaggy kife and puke challenge
     
  18.  
    ANC

    ANC Well-Known Member

    I think the best compromise is to allow branding and advertising in the form of educational materials.
    Known brands can build up a reputation good or bad, but it is accessible to the man in the street.
    I don't want to see lifestyle adds like racing boats in cannabis livery.

    As a long time user I still believe it is best not to need any crutches and not using cannabis or only using undecarboxylated cannabis and products is better than the semi dependance most of us have for our herb.
     

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