Experienced Electrician! Here to Answer Any and All Growroom Electrical Questions

Discussion in 'Grow Room Design & Setup' started by bricktown73, Apr 7, 2009.

  1.  
    Bookush34

    Bookush34 Active Member

    Why not?
     
  2.  
    rkymtnman

    rkymtnman Well-Known Member

    there is no return line to share.

    240v is 2 hot 120's. no common/neutral. only a ground.
     
  3.  
    Bookush34

    Bookush34 Active Member


    Not All
    My house has 4 strand.
    Black- 120v hot.
    Red- 120v hot
    White- return/neutral
    Bare - ground
     
  4.  
    rkymtnman

    rkymtnman Well-Known Member

    that must be for a dryer/range then since some parts/components are 240v, some are 120v.
     
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  5.  
    Bookush34

    Bookush34 Active Member

    It’s was a junction for my old hottub.

    I split it about 4 yrs ago. I have amp clamped it and checked for voltage drop under load. All was good.

    Just swapped out the 40amp Gfic do 2 separate 15amp gfic. Breakers.

    Just thought I would see what I got for answers.
     
  6.  
    rkymtnman

    rkymtnman Well-Known Member

    that makes sense. the heater was 240v and the lights etc was 120v.
     
    Bookush34 likes this.
  7.  
    rkymtnman

    rkymtnman Well-Known Member

    i'm not positive but i think you have to have some type of physical junction b/t the 2 15A breakers so that they are both on or both off.
     
  8.  
    Bookush34

    Bookush34 Active Member

    I did the copper bar to connect the two breaker toggles.
    If you know what I mean?
     
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  9.  
    rkymtnman

    rkymtnman Well-Known Member

    yep. you'd be in a world of shit if one was off, one was on and you were working on the off one thinking it was de-energized
     
  10.  
    Bookush34

    Bookush34 Active Member

    Just a good wake up call. Lol.
     
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  11.  
    rkymtnman

    rkymtnman Well-Known Member

    better than Red Bull.
     
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  12.  
    Stevie51

    Stevie51 Active Member

    This is my understanding of the basic difference between European systems and North American systems. Europeans use 230 volts 50Hz electrical circuits that comprise of one ungrounded current-carrying conductor and one grounded current-carrying conductor, thus would use single-pole circuit breakers for their circuit breakers. The vast majority of residents living in North America are supplied with a 120/240 volts split-phase 60Hz electrical service. Although we use a grounded conductor (neutral) as one of the current-carrying conductor in our 120 volts circuits, we do not use a grounded conductor as a current-carrying conductor in our 240 volts circuits. Therefore we are required to use double-pole circuit breakers for the circuit breakers in our 240 volts circuits, while single-pole circuit breakers are used in our 120 volts circuits. Both European and North American uses a grounded (the normally noncurrent-carrying) conductor for the safety ground.
     
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  13.  
    OzCocoLoco

    OzCocoLoco Well-Known Member

    Unless you could garauntee that you would have a balanced load the neutral/return
    it could have more current going through it than it would be rated to carry.
     
  14.  
    Bookush34

    Bookush34 Active Member

    Except it’s 6 gauge wire. I could run 4x 1000watt hps and be totally fine.

    With 2 15 amp breakers. You can’t overload it.
     
  15.  
    OzCocoLoco

    OzCocoLoco Well-Known Member

    Not sure what size 6 gauge wire is ? What’s it’s rated current carrying capacity ?
     
  16.  
    OzCocoLoco

    OzCocoLoco Well-Known Member

    Is 6 gauge is rated to 55 A.
     
  17.  
    OzCocoLoco

    OzCocoLoco Well-Known Member

    Over here (Australia) every circuit with a socket has to be protected by a 30 mA R.C.D not sure what you guys use for earth leakage but you couldn’t share a neutral on the load side between 2 different circuits the breaker would Trip as soon as either circuit went under load.
     
    Bean Busy likes this.
  18.  
    bb247

    bb247 New Member

    How's it going everybody. Safety question here.

    I am planning out the power for my two-tent setup. Both will run COBs, one drawing up to ~600W and the other drawing up to ~300W. In addition to lights, I will be powering up to 5 8" clip-on fans (Active Air brand with transformer block) and a 6" inline fan. I would also like to power my computer on the same circuit but I can be talked out of that.

    My question is how to do this in the safest way possible without adding new circuits to the circuitbreaker. I was intending to purchase one of these to connect to the wall:

    [​IMG]
    ^^^ with the GCFI on the end there. To this I was going to plug in the grow lights (all Mean Wells connected with WAGO blocks), a second one of these Tripp Lite but without the GFCI plug to send to the larger grow tent where most of the ventilation will be powered, and a cord similar to the one below to send to the smaller tent for a couple of clip-on fans there. My question is: is this safe? If not, what should I buy instead? I already own the cable below and the Tripp Lite above (without GFCI).

    [​IMG]
    Many thanks in advance.
     
  19.  
    Canigrow?

    Canigrow? Member

    Safety is not really an issue. Your house plugs are rated to accept 15amps of load. If you plug more than that into your outlets it will trip the breaker. Usually 12 outlets max on a circuit. Includes plugs and lights calculated at an average of 1 amp per outlet. If you know what else is on that circuit the only thing that should happen is lights dimming when your setup kicks on. Not the best for your pc but hey we all have to make sacrifices. As long as the extensions are rated for enough amps and possibly wet conditions that's all you can do.
     
    elkamino likes this.

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