Building Strong and Healthy roots?

Discussion in 'Advanced Marijuana Cultivation' started by max316420, Feb 24, 2018.

  1.  
    max316420

    max316420 Well-Known Member

    Can anyone recommend a supplement for building strong and healthy roots? It will be used in promix and would prefer a liquid rather than a powder. Any input would be greatly appreciated : )
     
  2.  
    somedude584

    somedude584 Well-Known Member

    Recharge, photosynthesis plus, and hydroguard are my supplementals. The photo plus smells like the worst runs you've ever had, but...
     
    max316420 likes this.
  3.  
    max316420

    max316420 Well-Known Member

    Might seem like a new growers question but took a 4 year vacation from gardening and I know there are plenty of new products on the market
     
  4.  
    max316420

    max316420 Well-Known Member

    Do "non" organic nutrients kill beneficial bacteria?
     
  5.  
    max316420

    max316420 Well-Known Member

    wow so just went to amazon and read some reviews on the "recharge" and WOW not one person had anything negative to say lol Think ill be ordering some right now
     
  6.  
    somedude584

    somedude584 Well-Known Member

    Yeah, it has been a good product for me so far.
     
  7.  
    max316420

    max316420 Well-Known Member

    do you know if you can use the recharge with non organic nutes?
     
  8.  
    somedude584

    somedude584 Well-Known Member

    Yes, they recommend to use it with every feeding with in-organic nutrients.
     
  9.  
    jonsnow399

    jonsnow399 Well-Known Member

    and if they are mj specific, 99 percent are bullshit.
     
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  10.  
    somedude584

    somedude584 Well-Known Member

    Hygrozyme is another great product I forgot to mention.
     
  11.  
    ChefKimbo

    ChefKimbo Well-Known Member

    Proper wet/dry cycle is the best way to build healthy roots. This is also strain dependent. I would start there.
     
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  12.  
    SchmoeJoe

    SchmoeJoe Well-Known Member

    My phone isn't letting me post the link but there's a 10 year University study that showed that kelp extract and humic acid used in a specific 5:2 ratio produced a 50% a increase in lateral root growth. I forget if the ratio favored kelp or humic acid but you'll want to look it up for yourself either way.
     
  13.  
    SchmoeJoe

    SchmoeJoe Well-Known Member

    Again, my phone isn't letting me post the link but there's an article detailing research on this subject that will answer this question very well. The title is;

    "Soil Sorcery, The Secret To Rich, Dark, Carbon Capturing Soil? Treat Your Microbes Well".
     
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  14.  
    Chip Green

    Chip Green Well-Known Member

    For seedlings especially in my experience....
    For every 1 seedling that dies from dehydration, thousands are abused, even murdered via drowning in WET medium....
     
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  15.  
    jonsnow399

    jonsnow399 Well-Known Member

    It says farmers in Australia would routinely burn their wheat stubble. WTF would you do that! Farmers around here routinely plow under anything like that.
    I believe this is the link you were talking about.
    http://www.gardenandgreenhouse.net/...-and-seaweed-extracts-a-powerful-combination/
     
  16.  
    SchmoeJoe

    SchmoeJoe Well-Known Member

    That's the one on kelp and humic acid. There's still a lot of places that practice slash and burn ag. Not that that makes it a good practice.
     
  17.  
    jonsnow399

    jonsnow399 Well-Known Member

    actually the strict definition of slash and burn is
    "relating to or denoting a method of agriculture in which existing vegetation is cut down and burned off before new seeds are sown, typically used as a method for clearing forest land for farming." Definitely a terrible practice but I understand they want to clear the land as soon as possible, but there is no reason I can think of to burn stubble instead of plowing it under. But enough of that,my question is how do you determine the correct 5:2 ratio when there are so many different kelp and humic acids?
     
  18.  
    SchmoeJoe

    SchmoeJoe Well-Known Member

    You're right, there's a big difference between slashing a forest to the ground and burning what's left to clear ground for farming and burning a field between crops. I live in an area where field burning is common practice and still obviously used the wrong term for what I meant.

    I'm not clear on how to get that exact 5:2 ratio either but I'd imagine that either the full published research would have that info or you could take a short cut and contact the universities agricultural extension and ask them.
     
  19.  
    Psylosin

    Psylosin Member

    One part that stuck out to me here is in paragraph 3 where they talk about SOD:

    " Fortunately, under ideal conditions plants produce all of the SOD that they need to protect themselves. But under stressful conditions such as heat stress, drought stress, salt stress or UV stress, plants can’t produce enough SOD to protect themselves from the barrage of damaging free radicals. Using a combination of humic acid/seaweed helps the plants build a reserve of SOD and keeps the plants growing at peak efficiency."

    Curious if this would help to mitigate the slow growth many growers seem to experience when supplementing UV.
     

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