Books... What are you reading? And what do you recommend?

ganjames

Well-Known Member
Right now I'm reading Under The Dome by Stephen King. And let me tell you, I hate Stephen Kings writing... I think he's a mediocre writer at best that just won't quit typing up his bullshit ideas.

I really like Augusten Burroughs, he has a way of keeping my attention.
 

Squizz

Active Member
I like reading autobiographies. Here's the main ones I keep reading over, and over again:

Dave Mustaine
Slash
Ozzy Obsbourne
Scott Weiland
Sammy Hagar

And I'm waiting for Duff McKagen's book, which should be badass.

Don't really read too much fiction, outside of true crime-type stuff.
 

RyanTheRhino

Well-Known Member


will have you thinking.

How tall is that tree? How far away is that cloud, and how heavy is it? Why are the droplets on that spider web spaced apart so evenly? If you have ever asked questions like these while outdoors, and wondered how you might figure out the answers, this is a book for you. An entertaining and informative collection of fascinating puzzles from the natural world around us, "A Mathematical Nature Walk" will delight anyone who loves nature or math or both.

John Adam presents ninety-six questions about many common natural phenomena--and a few uncommon ones--and then shows how to answer them using mostly basic mathematics. Can you weigh a pumpkin just by carefully looking at it? Why can you see farther in rain than in fog? What causes the variations in the colors of butterfly wings, bird feathers, and oil slicks? And why are large haystacks prone to spontaneous combustion? These are just a few of the questions you'll find inside. Many of the problems are illustrated with photos and drawings, and the book also has answers, a glossary of terms, and a list of some of the patterns found in nature. About a quarter of the questions can be answered with arithmetic, and many of the rest require only precalculus. But regardless of math background, readers will learn from the informal descriptions of the problems and gain a new appreciation of the beauty of nature and the mathematics that lies behind it.
 

ganjames

Well-Known Member
I'm actually thinking of reading this.. surprised I haven't already, but my book store doesn't have it.

 

Squizz

Active Member
Recently I've been getting into books like "Rich Dad, Poor Dad" and stuff by Donald Trump. Reading is easily my favorite pastime. I can kill HOURS in a bookstore. I also like reading athlete's autobiographies. Here's a few of my favorites:

Theo Fleury
Bob Probert
Daryl Strawberry
Josh Hamilton
Jose Canseco

There's tons of good stuff out there.
 

Urca

Well-Known Member
Hmm, read the gret gatsby, i like that book. candide is good too. I have a copy of walden pond that i have yet to read, and i got to page 450 in war an peace before my mom made me stop reading it, cause she said it was a waste of time. I loved Animal Farm, and i love love love Macbeth.
 

Carne Seca

Well-Known Member
Hmm, read the gret gatsby, i like that book. candide is good too. I have a copy of walden pond that i have yet to read, and i got to page 450 in war an peace before my mom made me stop reading it, cause she said it was a waste of time. I loved Animal Farm, and i love love love Macbeth.
I completely forgot about Animal Farm. I read that when I was 12 or 13. That was before I realized it was political satire. :p
 

Urca

Well-Known Member
I read it when i was 14 and cried for an hour. It was good. I love to read. I have so many books, and i like reading the classics too, i was a huge fan of the secret garden when i was a little kid, and also I learned all of the greek myths, read sophocles (when i was a freshman. I read Ajax, Oedipus Rex, and Antigone) I love reading shakespeare too. love macbeth, one of the best stories ever told, and I liked Taming of the Shrew. I read lots of celtic, norse, and egyptian myths.
 

Winter Woman

Well-Known Member
Sounds like a good book for the Library (the restroom). Sometimes I spend so much time in there my legs go numb, I get a little too engrossed and can't stop. Reading I mean. ;-)



will have you thinking.

How tall is that tree? How far away is that cloud, and how heavy is it? Why are the droplets on that spider web spaced apart so evenly? If you have ever asked questions like these while outdoors, and wondered how you might figure out the answers, this is a book for you. An entertaining and informative collection of fascinating puzzles from the natural world around us, "A Mathematical Nature Walk" will delight anyone who loves nature or math or both.

John Adam presents ninety-six questions about many common natural phenomena--and a few uncommon ones--and then shows how to answer them using mostly basic mathematics. Can you weigh a pumpkin just by carefully looking at it? Why can you see farther in rain than in fog? What causes the variations in the colors of butterfly wings, bird feathers, and oil slicks? And why are large haystacks prone to spontaneous combustion? These are just a few of the questions you'll find inside. Many of the problems are illustrated with photos and drawings, and the book also has answers, a glossary of terms, and a list of some of the patterns found in nature. About a quarter of the questions can be answered with arithmetic, and many of the rest require only precalculus. But regardless of math background, readers will learn from the informal descriptions of the problems and gain a new appreciation of the beauty of nature and the mathematics that lies behind it.
 
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