AP: 267 million Facebook users names, phone numbers, and user id's found on the open internet.

Communist Dreamer

Well-Known Member
Simple solution: don't get a Facebook account. If all the Russian interference stemmed from Facebook, why don't you start a rally meet up using a Facebook post. That way we can get the most people out there to stop using Facebook. Because, how else are people going to know if they don't see it on Facebook?
 

hanimmal

Well-Known Member
Simple solution: don't get a Facebook account. If all the Russian interference stemmed from Facebook, why don't you start a rally meet up using a Facebook post. That way we can get the most people out there to stop using Facebook. Because, how else are people going to know if they don't see it on Facebook?
That is not how time works edge lord.

All that data is already out there, now it is about people understanding this and knowing that it is too late.
 

Communist Dreamer

Well-Known Member
That is not how time works edge lord.

All that data is already out there, now it is about people understanding this and knowing that it is too late.
So we don't tell people, "you stupid idiot! Why did you put all that information so easily accessibe to a Google search on your Facebook account?"

Why do we coddle stupid people? How will they learn they're stupid otherwise? I don't have a Facebook account, never have, never will. This isn't my problem.

I can kind of get on board with your "this is all the evil white man's fault" argument. But that one too falls short because I didn't do it, and the majority of white folks didn't either. There's just a lot of evil white men, who happen to have lots of money. But there's also an evil black woman who's doing the same garbage by the name of Oprah. Then there's Alice Walton, an evil white woman. So now we got two Democrats who are evil vile capitalist scum who care more about money than they do about you.

So your whole evil white man theory kind of falls apart, but it's got some traction, because most of the evil white billionaires, and hundreds of millionaires are mostly evil white men.

But your whole, "Russia "stole" the information from poor Facebook users doesn't fly." The real story is, "a bunch of stupid idiots got data mined for posting information on Facebook, when it's widely known Mark Zuckerberg doesn't care who gets your information and even got in big time trouble for it by testifying before congress."

This is like one of those many #metoo stories where the person wasn't actually raped, but later regretted having sex with someone their friends made fun of them over.

In both cases you did something stupid. The end. Don't do it again.
 

hanimmal

Well-Known Member
So we don't tell people, "you stupid idiot! Why did you put all that information so easily accessibe to a Google search on your Facebook account?"
The information is not posted on Facebook necessarily, it could be that another app or their phones were linked back to the Facebook account and they did not know it at the time. Also it could have been added after with phishing programs.

Why do we coddle stupid people? How will they learn they're stupid otherwise? I don't have a Facebook account, never have, never will. This isn't my problem.
You don't have family or friends with a Facebook profile?

I can kind of get on board with your "this is all the evil white man's fault" argument. But that one too falls short because I didn't do it, and the majority of white folks didn't either. There's just a lot of evil white men, who happen to have lots of money. But there's also an evil black woman who's doing the same garbage by the name of Oprah. Then there's Alice Walton, an evil white woman. So now we got two Democrats who are evil vile capitalist scum who care more about money than they do about you.

So your whole evil white man theory kind of falls apart, but it's got some traction, because most of the evil white billionaires, and hundreds of millionaires are mostly evil white men.
lmao what is Oprah doing. I don't have any issues what so ever with white people, so you can project your insecurities elsewhere. I just point out that the power structure has been fully controlled by the Wealthy White Heterosexual Male Only agenda for at least a couple thousand years in Western civilization. And that the Republicans have firmly planted their flag in that community.

Democrats are not the ones with a skin color requirement.

But your whole, "Russia "stole" the information from poor Facebook users doesn't fly." The real story is, "a bunch of stupid idiots got data mined for posting information on Facebook, when it's widely known Mark Zuckerberg doesn't care who gets your information and even got in big time trouble for it by testifying before congress."
You have no credibility and are an obvious troll trying to smokescreen for Trump and Putin. But anyone who is interested in why he is wrong, see Cambridge Analytica.
 

hanimmal

Well-Known Member
well thank god they don't have the addresses..on the flip if they had a really good sales team..what a find!
Right? Its a good thing that the Russian military has not been hacking our businesses that we give all of our information to for years to add to this treasure trove, giving them a nice profile of how to attack/advertise to almost 270 million people in their homes, forever.

https://www.businessinsider.com/data-breaches-retailers-consumer-companies-2019-1
Screen Shot 2020-07-29 at 12.59.18 PM.png
 

hanimmal

Well-Known Member
https://apnews.com/article/election-2020-race-and-ethnicity-media-misinformation-social-media-d24e3276008c938fd861696369b0766c
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Two influential Democrats on Capitol Hill have urged Facebook to take stronger action against misinformation, voter suppression and incitements to violence ahead of the 2020 election.

In a letter sent to the company on Sunday, U.S. Representatives Pramila Jayapal and David Cicilline accused Facebook of failing to enforce its own rules when it comes to false claims about the election, and not doing enough to stop right-wing militias and white supremacist groups from using the platform to organize potentially violent events.

“With the election less than 50 days away, the lack of concerted action by Facebook to address this threat to our democracy is a grave concern,” the two lawmakers wrote. “We are at the precipice of a democratic crisis, and Facebook must take all immediate steps within Facebook’s power to avert this crisis.”

Congress has done little to increase oversight of social media companies, so the letter amounts to little more than a public scolding. Federal officials have largely let the companies set their own policies on hate speech and misinformation.

Facebook did not immediately respond to the letter, which reflects long-standing tensions between the company and lawmakers from both parties. While Republicans have accused Facebook of stifling conservative opinions, Democrats say it has failed to fully address misinformation and the exploitation of the platform by foreign and domestic groups looking to divide the country.

Specifically, the lawmakers asked Facebook to remove any post, group or page that promotes racial violence, voter suppression or election-related misinformation.

They also urged Facebook to hire more experts on racial hate groups and to improve enforcement of an existing ban on posts encouraging people to take weapons to polls or election offices. Finally, Jayapal and Cicilline call on Facebook to enforce its rules equally on President Donald Trump, who has repeatedly posted baseless claims about voting and election integrity.

Facebook has announced several changes intended to curb voting misinformation, and has also removed hundreds of accounts tied to hate groups or individuals who encouraged followers to show up armed at protests against racist policing. But Cicilline and Jayapal say the efforts haven’t gone far enough.

Cicilline, of Rhode Island, and Jayapal, of Washington state, have emerged as two of the company’s fiercest critics in the nation’s capital. Both grilled Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg over his company’s policies during a hearing this summer by the House antitrust subcommittee, which Cicilline leads.
 

hanimmal

Well-Known Member
https://apnews.com/article/election-2020-media-misinformation-social-media-elections-f11df03622f7d272faeccddeb95a641d
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WASHINGTON (AP) — The CEOs of technology giants Facebook, Google and Twitter are expected to testify for an Oct. 28 Senate hearing on tech companies’ control over hate speech and misinformation on their platforms.

The Senate Commerce Committee voted last week to authorize subpoenas for Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Sundar Pichai of Google and Twitter’s Jack Dorsey to force them to testify if they didn’t agree to do so voluntarily. Spokespeople for the companies said Monday that the CEOs will cooperate.

The hearing “must be constructive and focused on what matters most to the American people: how we work together to protect elections,” Twitter said in a tweet in its policy channel.

The hearing will come less than a week before Election Day. It marks a new bipartisan initiative against Big Tech companies, which have been under increasing scrutiny in Washington and from state attorneys general over issues of competition, consumer privacy and hate speech.

The executives’ testimony is needed “to reveal the extent of influence that their companies have over American speech during a critical time in our democratic process,” said Sen. Roger Wicker, a Mississippi Republican who heads the Commerce Committee.

Facebook, meanwhile, is expanding restrictions on political advertising, including new bans on messages claiming widespread voter fraud. The new prohibitions laid out in a blog post came days after President Donald Trump raised the prospect of mass fraud in the vote-by-mail process during a debate last week with Democratic rival Joe Biden.

With Trump leading the way, conservative Republicans have kept up a barrage of criticism of Silicon Valley’s social media platforms, which they accuse without evidence of deliberately suppressing conservative views.

The Justice Department has asked Congress to roll back long-held legal protections for online platforms, putting down a legislative marker in Trump’s drive against the social media giants. The proposed changes would strip some of the bedrock protections that have generally shielded the companies from legal responsibility for what people post on their platforms.

Trump signed an executive order earlier this year challenging the protections from lawsuits under a 1996 telecommunications law that has served as the foundation for unfettered speech on the internet.

Democrats, on the other hand, have focused their criticism of social media mainly on hate speech, misinformation and other content that can incite violence or keep people from voting. They have criticized Big Tech CEOs for failing to police content, homing in on the platforms’ role in hate crimes and the rise of white nationalism in the U.S.
 

hanimmal

Well-Known Member
https://apnews.com/article/election-2020-media-social-media-elections-mark-zuckerberg-14e8073ce6f7bd2a674c99ac7bbfc240
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Facebook is banning posts that deny or distort the Holocaust and will start directing people to authoritative sources if they search for information about the Nazi genocide.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced the new policy Monday, the latest attempt by the company to take action against conspiracy theories and misinformation ahead of the U.S. presidential election three weeks away.

The decision comes amid a push by Holocaust survivors around the world who lent their voices to a campaign targeting Zuckerberg beginning this summer, urging him to take action to remove Holocaust denial posts from the social media site.

Coordinated by the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, the #NoDenyingIt campaign used Facebook itself to make the survivors’ entreaties to Zuckerberg heard, posting one video per day urging him to remove Holocaust-denying groups, pages and posts as hate speech.

MORE TECH STORIES:
The testimonials coincided with an advertising boycott by companies pushing Facebook into taking a stronger stand against various forms of hate speech and extremism around the world.

Facebook said Monday that the new policy “is supported by the well-documented rise in anti-Semitism globally and the alarming level of ignorance about the Holocaust, especially among young people.” Surveys have shown some younger Americans believe the Holocaust was a myth or has been exaggerated.

Tech companies began promising to take a firmer stand against accounts used to promote hate and violence after a 2017 rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, where a self-described white supremacist drove into a crowd of counterprotesters. Yet Facebook and other companies have been slower to respond to posts that amplify false information, but don’t pose an immediate threat of violence or other physical harm.

Zuckerberg said in a blog post Monday that he believes the new policy strikes the “right balance” in drawing the lines between what is and isn’t acceptable speech.

“I’ve struggled with the tension between standing for free expression and the harm caused by minimizing or denying the horror of the Holocaust,” he wrote. “My own thinking has evolved as I’ve seen data showing an increase in anti-Semitic violence, as have our wider policies on hate speech.”

Zuckerberg had raised the ire of the Claims Conference, based in New York, and others with comments in 2018 to the tech website Recode that posts denying the Nazi annihilation of 6 million Jews would not necessarily be removed. He said he did not think Holocaust deniers were “intentionally” getting it wrong, and that as long as posts were not calling for harm or violence, even offensive content should be protected.

Full Coverage: Technology
After an outcry, Zuckerberg, who is Jewish himself, clarified that while he personally found “Holocaust denial deeply offensive” he believed that “the best way to fight offensive bad speech is with good speech.”

The Anti-Defamation League said it was relieved by Monday’s shift but criticized Facebook for taking nearly a decade after the New York-based group first began to publicly call on the company to curb Holocaust denial in 2011. The group tracked more anti-Semitic incidents in the U.S. last year than at an any time over the past four decades, and has said it continues to find Holocaust denial groups on Facebook, some hidden and most private.

“While Facebook has made numerous positive changes to its policies since that time, it stubbornly had held onto this outrageous platform policy, even in the face of the undeniable threat of growing antisemitism and antisemitic violence around the world,” the group’s CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt, wrote in a blog post.

The Claims Conference on Monday said it welcomed Zuckerberg’s changed approach and the company’s decision to take action after its campaign of survivor testimonials.

“It’s a very important statement and it’s a building block toward ensuring that this sort of anti-Semitism is not amplified,” said Greg Schneider, the group’s executive vice president.

The group on Sunday posted its 75th video from a Holocaust survivor appealing directly to Zuckerberg. Fred Kurz, an American who was born in Austria in 1937, described losing both of his parents in concentration camps.

Zuckerberg never met directly with the group but Schneider said he believes the voices of survivors and their “moral authority” made a difference.

“Honestly, I’m a little surprised it took 75 days, but I’m glad it happened,” he said.

Facebook said Monday it would immediately begin removing Holocaust denial posts from Facebook and Instagram, which it owns, but it could take some time to train the company’s technical systems and human moderators to enforce it on a global scale.

Several other groups that had pushed for Facebook to take a stricter line on Holocaust denial said Monday’s move was an important step.

“Facebook is showing that it recognizes Holocaust denial for what it truly is — a form of antisemitism and therefore hate speech,” Ronald Lauder, president of the World Jewish Congress, said in a prepared statement.

Yad Vashem, Israel’s national Holocaust memorial, said it supports Facebook’s new initiative to direct its users to “credible and fact-based” information about the Holocaust, such as the memorial’s website.
 

hanimmal

Well-Known Member
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Ever since Russian agents and other opportunists abused its platform in an attempt to manipulate the 2016 U.S. presidential election, Facebook has insisted — repeatedly — that it’s learned its lesson and is no longer a conduit for misinformation, voter suppression and election disruption.

But it has been a long and halting journey for the social network. Critical outsiders, as well as some of Facebook’s own employees, say the company’s efforts to revise its rules and tighten its safeguards remain wholly insufficient to the task, despite it having spent billions on the project. As for why, they point to the company’s persistent unwillingness to act decisively over much of that time.

“Am I concerned about the election? I’m terrified,” said Roger McNamee, a Silicon Valley venture capitalist and an early Facebook investor turned vocal critic. “At the company’s current scale, it’s a clear and present danger to democracy and national security.”

RELATED STORIES
The company’s rhetoric has certainly gotten an update. CEO Mark Zuckerberg now casually references possible outcomes that were unimaginable in 2016 — among them, possible civil unrest and potentially a disputed election that Facebook could easily make even worse — as challenges the platform now faces.

“This election is not going to be business as usual,” Zuckerberg wrote in a September Facebook post in which he outlined Facebook’s efforts to encourage voting and remove misinformation from its service. “We all have a responsibility to protect our democracy.”

Yet for years Facebook executives have seemed to be caught off guard whenever their platform — created to connect the world — was used for malicious purposes. Zuckerberg has offered multiple apologies over the years, as if no one could have predicted that people would use Facebook to live-stream murders and suicides, incite ethnic cleansings, promote fake cancer cures or attempt to steal elections.

Full Coverage: Election 2020

While other platforms like Twitter and YouTube have also struggled to address misinformation and hateful content, Facebook stands apart for its reach and scale and, compared to many other platforms, its slower response to the challenges identified in 2016.

In the immediate aftermath of President Donald Trump’s election, Zuckerberg offered a remarkably tone-deaf quip regarding the notion that “fake news” spread on Facebook could have influenced the 2016 election, calling it “a pretty crazy idea.” A week later, he walked back the comment.

Since then, Facebook has issued a stream of mea culpas for its slowness to act against threats to the 2016 election and promised to do better. “I don’t think they have become better at listening,” said David Kirkpatrick, author of a book on Facebook’s rise. “What’s changed is more people have been telling them they need to do something.”

The company has hired outside fact-checkers, added restrictions — then more restrictions — on political advertisements and taken down thousands of accounts, pages and groups it found to be engaging in “coordinated inauthentic behavior.” That’s Facebook’s term for fake accounts and groups that maliciously target political discourse in countries ranging from Albania to Zimbabwe.

It’s also started added warning labels to posts that contain misinformation about voting and has, at times, taken steps to limit the circulation of misleading posts. In recent weeks the platform also banned posts that deny the Holocaust and joined Twitter in limiting the spread of an unverified political story about Hunter Biden, son of Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden, published by the conservative New York Post.

All this unquestionably puts Facebook in a better position than it was in four years ago. But that doesn’t mean it’s fully prepared. Despite tightened rules banning them, violent militias are still using the platform to organize. Recently, this included a foiled plot to kidnap the governor of Michigan.

In the four years since the last election, Facebook’s earnings and user growth have soared. This year, analysts expect the company to rake in profits of $23.2 billion on revenue of $80 billion, according to FactSet. It currently boasts 2.7 billion users worldwide, up from 1.8 billion at this time in 2016.

Facebook faces a number of government investigations into its size and market power, including an antitrust probe by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission. An earlier FTC investigation socked Facebook with a large $5 billion fine, but didn’t require any additional changes.

“Their No. 1 priority is growth, not reducing harm,” Kirkpatrick said. “And that is unlikely to change.”

Part of the problem: Zuckerberg maintains an iron grip on the company, yet doesn’t take criticism of him or his creation seriously, charges social media expert Jennifer Grygiel, a Syracuse University communications professor. But the public knows what’s going on, they said. “They see COVID misinformation. They see how Donald Trump exploits it. They can’t unsee it.”

Facebook insists it takes the challenge of misinformation seriously — especially when it comes to the election.

“Elections have changed since 2016, and so has Facebook,” the company said in a statement laying out its policies on the election and voting. “We have more people and better technology to protect our platforms, and we’ve improved our content policies and enforcement.”

Grygiel says such comments are par for the course: “This company uses PR in place of an ethical business model.”

Kirkpatrick notes that board members and executives who have pushed back against the CEO — a group that includes the founders of Instagram and WhatsApp — have left the company.

“He is so certain that Facebook’s overall impact on the world is positive” and that critics don’t give him enough credit for that, Kirkpatrick said of Zuckerberg. As a result, the Facebook CEO isn’t inclined to take constructive feedback. “He doesn’t have to do anything he doesn’t want to. He has no oversight,” Kirkpatrick said.

The federal government has so far left Facebook to its own devices, a lack of accountability that has only empowered the company, according to U.S. Rep. Pramila Jayapal, a Washington Democrat who grilled Zuckerberg during a July Capitol Hill hearing.

Warning labels are of limited value if the algorithms underlying the platform are designed to push polarizing material at users, she said. “I think Facebook has done some things that indicate it understands its role. But it has been, in my opinion, far too little, too late.”
 

blu3bird

Well-Known Member
Right? Its a good thing that the Russian military has not been hacking our businesses that we give all of our information to for years to add to this treasure trove, giving them a nice profile of how to attack/advertise to almost 270 million people in their homes, forever.

https://www.businessinsider.com/data-breaches-retailers-consumer-companies-2019-1
View attachment 4638478
Russians are trying to attack me for real. I've been getting crazy spam emails for the last few days and here's one of them

Dear Customer,
Screenshot_20201022-031927.png

I don't even have a PayPal account lol

Also, more proof how fkn stupid Russians are. I pull into this shipper and swing my truck around OUT OF THE WAY OF THE DOCKS and get out to open the trailer doors and get back in my truck to get on the dock and look where this dumb mother fkr parks his piece of shit puke yellow Volvo
IMG_20201015_120705278.jpg

Only a dumb fkn Russian would park in front of the loading dock so no one else can get on the dock
 

hanimmal

Well-Known Member
Russians are trying to attack me for real. I've been getting crazy spam emails for the last few days and here's one of them

Dear Customer,
View attachment 4721613

I don't even have a PayPal account lol

Also, more proof how fkn stupid Russians are. I pull into this shipper and swing my truck around OUT OF THE WAY OF THE DOCKS and get out to open the trailer doors and get back in my truck to get on the dock and look where this dumb mother fkr parks his piece of shit puke yellow Volvo
View attachment 4721615

Only a dumb fkn Russian would park in front of the loading dock so no one else can get on the dock
The last week or so I have been getting spam texts and the new one is this last week or so getting offers for sex by gmail accounts.

I even had someone visit my house a while back, and as soon as they left they got a call from 'Russia'. No shit that was what their caller ID said.

I never really understood the scenes in the movies when the crazy guy feels all vindicated when whatever he had been crazy warning people about for years actually happens.
 
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