A short thread about elections.

GrassBurner

Well-Known Member
Ten times the population, what has that got to do with getting out the message needed in a month? Toward the end off a US election everybody is so sick of hearing the same thing they tune it out.
My bad, I was referencing knowing who won by 10 pm. But comparing American and Canadian politics is apples to oranges. We start a year ahead of time, because there are tons and tons of issues that you just can't fit into a month. Think of how far America's fingers stretch, around the entire world. We're talking about the most powerful govt on earth, I wouldn't feel comfortable deciding who is running that in a months time.
That's no dig to Canada, kudos on the lack of drama. But I think it just comes with the territory as far as America is concerned.
 

printer

Well-Known Member
My bad, I was referencing knowing who won by 10 pm. But comparing American and Canadian politics is apples to oranges. We start a year ahead of time, because there are tons and tons of issues that you just can't fit into a month. Think of how far America's fingers stretch, around the entire world. We're talking about the most powerful govt on earth, I wouldn't feel comfortable deciding who is running that in a months time.
That's no dig to Canada, kudos on the lack of drama. But I think it just comes with the territory as far as America is concerned.
People only choose on the big issues nationally and their local constituents. A person in New Yourk will not have an Arizona county influence the choice they have locally. On president, it usually comes down to a handful of issues and where the party lies on the political spectrum and where the voter lies on the spectrum. It is no different in Canada and most other democratic nations. OK, give the US two months. The rest of it is trying to outspend the other guy and the big winners are the advertising firms. It is the reason the US has an overabundance of lobbyists and companies funneling money into the coffers of the political parties. Best politicians money can buy.
 

printer

Well-Known Member
Aren't you guys paper the whole way? With a hand count? As secure a system as can be found today.
Yes, hand counts. I think I heard of a recount if things are real close. We also do not vote for DA's, Sheriffs, dog catchers... A nice simple, who do you want as politicians. We don't have different rules in different provinces, everybody plays by the same playbook.

 

injinji

Well-Known Member
When do the chinese hold their erections
A while back our county had a dog for SOE. He always had a wife and a girlfriend on the side. (and each time it all blew up he would marry the girlfriend, then find a new one) Everyone knew it, but he always won easily. One day someone had changed the signboard in the courthouse to read Supervisor of Erections. After a couple three days, someone pointed it out to him.
 

printer

Well-Known Member
I found this kind of quaint. Oh, us Canadians.

How interested outsiders use 'third party' status to promote causes, influence election
Likely dozens of third parties will spend a cumulative millions of dollars during the campaign

With an election underway, parties are officially on the hunt for the votes of Canadians, criss-crossing the country and campaigning right up to Sept. 20. And to fund all that travel, advertising and election gear, parties will be shelling out a lot of money.

But political parties and candidates will not be the only groups spending big in the election campaign. "Third parties" are also in the mix and will be hoping to shape the political conversation, get their issue prioritized and build up or tear down other political actors.

What kind of money is at play?

According to a limit set before the election call by Elections Canada, third parties are able to spend up to $525,700 overall during the campaign, but no more than $4,506 on activities in any given electoral district (like a billboard promoting a local candidate). But in 2019, only a handful of third parties ran up against a similar expenditure limit.

In the lead-up to and during the 2019 campaign, 140 registered third parties spent almost $12 million on regulated activities, according to their electoral campaign returns filed with Elections Canada. About three-quarters of that spending came during the formal campaign period itself, while the other quarter was spent during the "pre-election" period, which in 2019 was the time between June 30 and the start of the official campaign in September.

That compares to the more than $26 million the Liberals, for example, spent on the general election during the 2019 campaign, of which almost $14 million was advertising. So while third parties are by no means insignificant spenders during an election, political parties still far outpace them.


Millions of dollars. That won't even buy the US doughnuts.
 
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