Where to buy coco coir locally?

Discussion in 'Hallucinatory Substances' started by whiteshark, Sep 18, 2012.

  1.  
    whiteshark

    whiteshark Active Member

    Hey fellas,

    I'm wondering where you go go besides online to buy coco coir? I bought a bunch awhile back but I can't remember where. I haven't had much luck with garden supply stores.

    Thanks!
  2.  
    polyarcturus

    polyarcturus Well-Known Member

    hydro shop walmart hardware store, honestly if you cant find it at a garden store you may not be abl to find it, a peatmoss and gypsum misx is a suitable substitute.
    whiteshark likes this.
  3.  
    somebody1701

    somebody1701 Active Member

    They had it at Home Depot here for awhile. Last time I was there couldn't find it though.
  4.  
    whiteshark

    whiteshark Active Member

    hey poly,

    I've grown a coco/verm mix very successfully before. I'm trying to make a casing for my spawn. So are you saying the peatmoss and gypsum mix will be a suitable casing or do I need to mix it with something else? Honestly just trying to get this spawn fruiting sooner than later so yeah any casing substitutes you know would be great. I only know how to do it my one way.

    Thanks
  5.  
    weasels911

    weasels911 Active Member

    Pet stores have it. It's sold for reptile bedding. Usually sold in solid dry bricks that you soak with water, but you can also find bags of it already broken up.
    polyarcturus likes this.
  6.  
    Sencha

    Sencha Active Member

    Whatever you find, mix some perliite in with it.
  7.  
    weasels911

    weasels911 Active Member

    Adds a nice crunch to the fungus?
  8.  
    polyarcturus

    polyarcturus Well-Known Member

    lol perlite is not necessary really. i mean it will help with preventing compaction but your casing isnt supposed to be that thick. also perlite wont have as much water retention or a higher saturation point, thusw why its better just to not add it to the mix.

    some make a bed of perlite for the mycelium to sit on, which if done correctly will hold water(if too much water is used it can be disastrous from what ive heard and seen) and basically wick into the substrate which in turn means more flushs and larger flushes.
  9.  
    canndo

    canndo Well-Known Member

    I aviod pearlite in my substrate or casing. I am sure it works well but I have a problem with the fact that it is white and keeps me from making good and quick observations on the progress of the mycelium.

    Peat moss is one of the oldest casing materials there is. The problem with peat moss is the acid nature of the stuff. It is so acid that they have found perfectly preserved bodies long long dead in peat bogs as most of the decomposing organisms won't grow in it.

    If you use peat pay particular attention to your ph - which should be in the low 7's or high 6's. Buffer your peat with some fast acting basic material like slaked lime (not much) and then some more slower to disolve calcium like gypsum in order to counteract the increasing acids exuded by the mycelium as it ages.
  10.  
    canndo

    canndo Well-Known Member

    And about the coir, you want the very fine stuff for casing. Best if you sift it in order to get those threads and hairs out of it - they invite contamination.

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