Reviving soil that sat for over a year?

Discussion in 'Organics' started by Shakedown St., Jan 9, 2017.

  1.  
    Shakedown St.

    Shakedown St. Member

    Is it possible to bring back to life say your mixture/super soil that has been sitting for over a year? Would Recharge do it?
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2017
  2.  
    calliandra

    calliandra Well-Known Member

    Yes, I reactivate my living soil with compost tea.

    No idea what recharge is tho, nor am I sure what you really mean by supersoil. :bigjoint:
     
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  3.  
    chemphlegm

    chemphlegm Well-Known Member

    of course silly, feed and water it, fluff it too, then plant.
     
  4.  
    Shakedown St.

    Shakedown St. Member

    This Recharge, basically a mycorrhizae and bacillus mixture or pre-made nutrient tea to give your soil a blast into next week.


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    Last edited: Jan 10, 2017
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  5.  
    Shakedown St.

    Shakedown St. Member

    It was recommended that I not to let my soil sit for too long or the good microbes start to fade away, wait two months after making the mixture to let it cook and cool down but I would say my mixture has been sitting for 14 months.
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2017
  6.  
    chemphlegm

    chemphlegm Well-Known Member

    is there an expiration date on potting soil bags?
    minerals breaking down is precisely what you want in good soil. mineral rocks cannot be uptaken by plants. mold uses water and grows to break down rocks, its the only thing that can. the rocks shed their precious building blocks of energy in a form that the plant uses. fresh cut rocks, peat, sand and water has zero nutrients until they break down over time.
     
  7.  
    Rrog

    Rrog Well-Known Member

    The microbes are dormant. Add water and some plant. Any plant. The roots will trigger more microbes. When you're ready to plant Canna, just yank that temporary plant.
     
  8.  
    backtracker

    backtracker Well-Known Member

    microbes eat rocks, electrolysis degrades metals/minerals and oxygen is highly reactive they all play a part .
     
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  9.  
    chemphlegm

    chemphlegm Well-Known Member

    fungi eats rocks. single cell fungi is a microbe

    "When a hungry fungus anchors itself to an unsuspecting rock, it has a plan of attack. First, it unleashes acid, dissolving surface minerals to get to its food. Then, it releases chemicals that extract that food—in this case, iron. Finally, its fast-growing fungal filaments cut into the remaining rock like a knife, carving deep channels that break up iron-depleted surfaces and expose fresh layers for consumption. Step by step, the fungus Talaromyces flavus knows how to get what it wants. “These organisms, they don’t have a brain, but they’re pretty smart,” says Henry Teng, a geochemist at George Washington University in Washington, D.C." http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016...-disintegrates-rocks-acid-and-cellular-knives

    they stuck fungus cells on top of lizardite samples and watched with special microscopic tools. They measured the pH in areas around fungal cells that hadn’t yet attached themselves to the lizardite. But once cells attached to the mineral surface, pH levels dropped sharply—evidence that the fungus was releasing mineral-dissolving acid. The researchers documented a similar surface-triggered release of siderophores, chemicals that leach iron from the mineral. Teng says previous studies have measured weak, diffuse levels of acid and siderophores when mineral and fungus are put together in the same solution
     
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  10.  
    backtracker

    backtracker Well-Known Member

    This article is mind bending.
    "Our study shows that bacteria living in biofilm communities do something similar to sending electronic messages to friends," said Jacqueline Humphries, a doctoral student working in Süel's laboratory and the first author of the paper. "In fact, the mechanism we discovered is general. We found that bacteria from one species can send long-range electrical signals that will lead to the recruitment of new members from another species. As a result, we've identified a new mechanism and paradigm for inter-species signaling."
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170112141216.htm
     
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  11.  
    ShLUbY

    ShLUbY Well-Known Member

    science daily is a badass site. lots of neat stuff on there.
     
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