Molasses-How much per gallon Water?

Discussion in 'General Marijuana Growing' started by Swisher Sweet, Jan 21, 2010.

  1.  
    Swisher Sweet

    Swisher Sweet Active Member

    How much molasses per gallon of water and what are the actual benefits to the plant.
  2.  
    hardroc

    hardroc New Member

    1 tbl spoon a gal. Gives the plants carbo's it needs
  3.  
    Swisher Sweet

    Swisher Sweet Active Member

    Thanks for the info.Please feel to post with any other suggestions.
  4.  
    hardroc

    hardroc New Member

    what do you wanna know?
  5.  
    Swisher Sweet

    Swisher Sweet Active Member

    What benifits besides carbs does it provide for the plant as I heard it actually effected the taste of the bud?
  6.  
    hardroc

    hardroc New Member

    I don't really know if that's true or not, as I've always used molassas on every grow......but you can smell a sweeter smell when you walk into the room after watering them, so I guess it might since smell/taste got hand in hand. Flushing is what really takes the chlorafyl (how ever you spell it) also the nute taste and also makes your weed burn better
  7.  
    Swisher Sweet

    Swisher Sweet Active Member

    Thanks for the info. The flushing phase. That should be the last two weeks water only. Is that what you mean?
  8.  
    hardroc

    hardroc New Member

    yea, but I still use molassas when I'm flushing, just no nutes. Ph'd water with 2 tbl spoons of molassas in the last 2 weeks, to really give it that weight
  9.  
    sambo020482

    sambo020482 Well-Known Member

    how do you dilute the molasses? ive never even seen the stuff but ive heard its basically black treacle which wouldnt disolve in water???
  10.  
    i need help I'm rookie

    i need help I'm rookie Active Member

    yes but get a flushing agent use it once then just use water. When do you use the molass. just heard of it now. I use all fox farm. And if i might add try using half of what fox farm suggests a little tip from the local grow op to much for your plants all at once they say.
  11.  
    hardroc

    hardroc New Member

    just pour a table spoon in the gallon jug and shake.
  12.  
    hardroc

    hardroc New Member

    I don't use flushing agents, because I think they don't really help, just out there to get cash and I'm cheap.
  13.  
    tokinman

    tokinman Well-Known Member

    make sure it is unsulfrated or un sulfured molasses... it is supposed to add about 25% weight/bulk if you use it during flowering due to extra sugar etc..
  14.  
    jdizzle22

    jdizzle22 Well-Known Member

    I wouldn't go with anymore than 1 tbsp and maybe only 1tsp as I think the sticky molasses may be making the op1/4-1/3rd inch of soil very hard and crusty to the point I have to dig it up a little so the water can sink in faster. It could be something else but my money is on the molasses as its the only sticky thing I ever feed them.
  15.  
    BadMrFrosty

    BadMrFrosty Member

    I was using Technaflora's "Sugar Daddy" but it is kinda pricey, so I am going to try using molasses insted.
    I have a sneaking suspicion that is all "sugar daddy" is.
  16.  
    cannatricks

    cannatricks Active Member

    This whole thread is filled with hearsay and myths...

    Molasses is used to encourage microherd growth in organically grown soils. If you are using chemical nutrients the molasses is doing just about nothing. Molasses works by feeding microorganisms in your soil with sugars and organic matter, in turn the extra growth of bacteria can break down the organic materials in your soil; releasing the nutrients from the organic compounds.

    If you are doing an organic grow, do a ton more research. Understanding the microherd and the relationship between fungus-bacteria-soil-plant is essential if you want to do it right.

    If your growing with a nute line, skip the molasses, your plant doesn't need carbs, nor does it need sugar to attract bugs.
    az2000 and Snafu1236 like this.
  17.  
    Snafu1236

    Snafu1236 Active Member

    You must've read Teaming:) My man!!!

    Though you have pointed out probably the biggest reason on the benefits, molasses does provide more than a carbohydrate energy source to the soil food web.

    Averaging an NPK of 1-0-5, molasses contains potash, sulfur, and quite a feww trace minerals; it can serve as both an excellent chelating agent and a soil conditioner.

    It is interesting, however, that oatmeal isn't used more. Powdered baby oatmeal is actually a more stable carbohydrate source for fungal mychorrizae. Molasses has a wider spectrum for both bacterial and fungal applications, however.

    Funny how some people are like: "molasses made my buds taste soo sweet". LoL.

    Glad to see some truth here...+rep
  18.  
    TwoTokeSmoke

    TwoTokeSmoke Active Member

    I needs to be Unsulfered Molasses, you can find it in the grocery stores in the baking section. Just heat up a cup of water in the Microwave and add the molasses to that and stir, it will dissolve rather quick. Then add that to your gallon of water and mix it up.
  19.  
    LT1RX7 Drifter

    LT1RX7 Drifter Active Member

    molasses does not add weight, is only useful in organic growing to provide a transportable sorce of carbs and feed micro life in the soil. It does not make weed taste better/sweeter, about the only thing it does when not use in a organic grow is lock out magnesium, and attract bugs, been using my bottle of molasses for a door stop for 3 years lol, and the statement about powdered baby oatmeal is almost 100% you can use it a natural soil amendment when you make your soil mix 1 cup for every 1.5 cu ft of soil media
  20.  
    cannatricks

    cannatricks Active Member

    Snafu, I have read some Teaming. I agree 100% with your post but didn't want to confuse the issue. NPK is a different issue here because the nutrients from the molasses can not be taken in by the plant directly. So all you reading this going "OO molasses has lots of K, I'm gonna use the a ton!" It won't work unless you are organically growing with an active microherd in the first place.

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