How deep to plant?

Discussion in 'Indoor Growing' started by LastBucsfan, Jun 16, 2008.

  1.  
    LastBucsfan

    LastBucsfan Active Member

    I read on this forum that a good method of germinating seeds is to place them in an inch of warm water for 24 hours and then plant them in soil. How deep should I plant them in the soil after doing this?
  2.  
    chuckbane

    chuckbane New Member

    i put my seeds in a moist cloth to germ.. then when the "tail" is about 1/4 inch long i plant the "tail" in the dirt going down and then sprinkle some dirt on top of the seed... the goal here is to not have the seed too deep that it will take forever to reach the top but keep it moist at the same time to ensure the shell comes off easy... that is why i just lightly sprinkle soil over the seed after the tail is all the way in the earth
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    Che Paddy

    Che Paddy Well-Known Member

    Hey man. I personally use the paper towel method but also tried putting seeds in a cup of ph corrected water for 48 hours and got good results also. Make sure U dont touch the taproot if it appears. Make a hole with a pencil about a half inch deep and then just sprinkle some more soil over the top. I usually water my soil before i put the seed in but then just drizzle some more water over the hole. Try put the taprrot at the bottom but it doesnt really matter if u dont it willl jsut take a couple of days longer to break the surface.

    Not saying this is the perfectly correct way to do it just saying what has got me good results
  4.  
    LastBucsfan

    LastBucsfan Active Member

    Thanks guys. One more question is it better to start them in a small pot and then transplant them to a bigger pot. Or is it ok to just start out with a big pot?

    Thanks in advance
  5.  
    JakeStoner

    JakeStoner Active Member

    You can start with a big pot
  6.  
    Che Paddy

    Che Paddy Well-Known Member

    I think its better just to start in large pots where possible. You can transplant but there is a small risk of shock and you'll slow them a day or two when their transplanted
  7.  
    chuckbane

    chuckbane New Member

    the benefit of starting with a small pot is the plant will make a very strong, stable, tight rooting system... this will help your plant from toppling over.... ive also notice that starting in larger pots slows vegetative growth for a while... i think this is because all energy is being used in setting down a stable rooting system.... ive seen roots grow a foot deep in the first week or so
  8.  
    KillerWeed420

    KillerWeed420 Well-Known Member

    I use 4 different size pots. The idea is to force more growth to the plant rather than all the enegy going to root growth. Weed has a lot of root structure and as long as you haven't added something that hurts root growth they do great. I always add a little Superthrive to the water when I transplant.
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    gangakween

    gangakween Active Member

    Start in a big pot. It's easier and you won't stress your plant out by Transplanting.
  10.  
    corners

    corners Active Member

    You also waste water, nutrients and man power trying to keep the soil correct and moving them around. I usually start with small square pots, then go 3 gallon. If iw ant a real big one id go 5 or 7 ater, but 3 gal is big enough
  11.  
    bud7144

    bud7144 Active Member

    I put my seeds about a 1/4 inch under the top of the soil after doing the paper towel method. I usually get tails in 24-36hrs then plant them, they typically pop about a day after or 2.
  12.  
    bud7144

    bud7144 Active Member

    I agree, i always start in party cups and move them to the new homes after a solid root base is grown. I have never experienced transplant shock, all you do is be careful, quick and feed with b1.. I see immediate growth the next day.
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    scroglodyte

    scroglodyte Well-Known Member

    i go 2" peat, to 6' pot, to 10" air-prune bag. Chuckbane is right, i feel, in that every time you transplant it gives a large network of roots a large are to develop side-shoots. a stabler, happier plant, with a more intricate root structure.

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