Duplicating Wild Landrace Soils

Discussion in 'Organics' started by thetrickstergod, Jan 21, 2013.

  1.  
    thetrickstergod

    thetrickstergod Active Member

    Just wondering if it could be important. Seems a soil database would be a good thing.
  2.  
    polyarcturus

    polyarcturus Well-Known Member

    too many variables. soil is soil. the only soil that could be compared is deep soil and basically you can do that here,
    http://soils.usda.gov/use/worldsoils/mapindex/

    match the soil info from the map to the land race of that region amd replicate that "type" of soil, not necessarily its composition.
  3.  
    Snafu1236

    Snafu1236 Active Member

    Landrace genetics are more about the climate of the area...ie temps, humidity levels, sun intensity/angles, daylight/dark hour times, etc.

    Soil is soil, really..the plant manipulates soil according to its needs...the external environment is what you want to control when dealing with landrace genetics in order to mimic previous grows.

    -Snafu
  4.  
    thetrickstergod

    thetrickstergod Active Member

    Really trying to understand how best to replicate landrace environments..I know I can control light/heat and humidity but it seems that soil composition is the big unknown...there is a rare landrace strain-Kalinga (northern Philippines) that I am interest in stabilizing and just wondering if soil replication would be useful.
  5.  
    Vindicated

    Vindicated Well-Known Member

    Grow a dozen or so plants, let them go to seed, tend to those plants as you normally would, and let those go to seed. Keep repeating and after five generations you got your own land race strain that's properly acclimated to your region. Land race strains are very hardy but also have lots of variations. They naturally stabilize over time but will always have a high phenotype.
  6.  
    Snafu1236

    Snafu1236 Active Member

    Again, soil does not matter. Landrace genetics may impart a flavor from the soil, but it is all about the environment the plant lives in, more than the nutrients it is pulling from the ground, when speaking of landrace genetics and the attempt to mimic the environment in which they grew.

    -Snafu
  7.  
    thetrickstergod

    thetrickstergod Active Member

    it seems you exclude soil from the environment, roots may disagree.
  8.  
    Snafu1236

    Snafu1236 Active Member

    Ugh. I am only trying to outlay some good information here in dealing with landrace genetics.

    I am not asking for a personal shot at me here, 'thetrickstergod'. It is easy to impart a flame on a thread without actually doing any research or reading to understand with what or whom you speak.

    If you only read maybe even one of my journals, or even a post from one of my threads on here, you would realize that I consider the Soil Food Web one of the most important factors of organic growing and their environment in which they live is critical for root growth promotion.

    However, it is ignorant and arrogant posts such as yours that is making RIU have a bad name.


    You and your 23 posts can piss off.


    -Snafu
  9.  
    Snafu1236

    Snafu1236 Active Member

    P.S. Soil/root environment should be moist, loaded with blended organic amendments, and thriving with microbiology. Anything other than that, the plant will suffer.

    LANDRACE genetics will only suffer if the soil environment is not consistent. There is no 'magic silver bullet' of a soil amendment that imparts a specific quality to a plant, aside possibly taste.

    So, if I go from London to Africa to the Hindu Kush region, all of those plants will require an according amount of HPK and micro-nutrients, along with the limiting factors of the environment. The qualities, the special traits, that are imparted to landrace genetics are from the formulation of the environment in which the plant adapts to over many years, it is not the plant roots adaptation to the soil over many years.

    But don't listen to me, I do not care about the basis of plant life, the roots.

    -Snafu

    P.S. and yes, I am sensitive.
  10.  
    Vincent VonBlown

    Vincent VonBlown New Member

    As with grapes when growing outdoors, the soil gives a certain flavor and body to what was grown in it. So if you want the full boat, in the replication. I'd say yes the native soil is important.
  11.  
    Snafu1236

    Snafu1236 Active Member

    Disagreed. Though it is a factor that plays a part for taste, my own opinion is that it is not nearly as much as a factor as the external environment above ground.

    But again, I have only replicated five different landrace strain environments, so I am not as experienced as others.

    However, most of the information you'll find on RIU will come from people who know how to type, but do not know how to grow...let alone landrace genetics.

    -Snafu
  12.  
    Rising Moon

    Rising Moon Active Member

    Soil is not "just soil". Quite a rediculous comment considering their are entire PHD programs dedicated to soil science.

    There are literally thousands of variables in the physical and chemical make-up of soil.
  13.  
    BelieveInJesus

    BelieveInJesus New Member

    A real gardener is not a man who cultivates flowers; he is a man who cultivates the soil. Organic gardening is based on knowledge and techniques gathered over thousands of years, using sustainable and holistic approaches.

    diggin that vindicated
  14.  
    thetrickstergod

    thetrickstergod Active Member

    I am interested in duplicating landrace soils up from the molecular level, seems fairly entry level soil science.
  15.  
    thetrickstergod

    thetrickstergod Active Member

  16.  
    thetrickstergod

    thetrickstergod Active Member

  17.  
    Snafu1236

    Snafu1236 Active Member

    This thread has gotten interesting.

    This will be my last post here. However, I have to cover this last topic, as I am a certified sommelier.

    Someone pointed out soil for winemaking. They are absolutely correct! The soil/terroire is very important....because soil directly affect flavor and taste(something I have said since my first post on this thread).

    This is because wine is made from a grapes, and the translocation of sucrose within the grape creates a sugar level that is desirable among wine drinkers....some are sweeter, some are bitter. Because of the composition of the soil, the soil will impart its own flavor profile into the grape and the corresponding sucrose levels, among other molecules.

    But again, Cannabis and genus Vitis are two completely different plants, so I do not like to overly compare them too much.


    Flame on, schoolyard botanists...you scared away probably one of the only people on this thread giving you accurate information!


    -Snafu
  18.  
    ultraviolet pirate

    ultraviolet pirate Active Member

    i think its a good question that deserves more input than just one person's. rock on.
  19.  
    Rising Moon

    Rising Moon Active Member

    Damn, the dude that pretends to know shit left...
  20.  
    polyarcturus

    polyarcturus Well-Known Member

    not that i disagree, but like i said. how deep do cannabis roots go? if we are talking about the top soil cannabis mostly lives in, there is no one consist ant composition anywhere in the word. if where talking about grapes, which can not be harvest for 2-3 years, than we are talking about deep root systems that reach deep soil, with consistent composition.

Share This Page