Pandemic 2020

mooray

Well-Known Member
Is it really even a point? Or is it just bullshit that he is pretending is out there based on some troll interpretation and statistical manipulation?
Yes, that! He's creating a false conflict so that he can be right about something that isn't even a point of contention.
 

hanimmal

Well-Known Member
Yes, that! He's creating a false conflict so that he can be right about something that isn't even a point of contention.
I think of is as the the jedi mind trick troll.



It is not clever, and people don't believe it, but they are so sick and tired of the bullshit that they might not say anything because they consider the effort is wasted energy.
 

Fogdog

Well-Known Member
This essay on the tragedy of education during the pandemic was pretty good. The author shares my opinion of online learning. Last year was an effing disaster in my area. It's going to take a a while to get my youngest back on track:

I Taught Online School This Year. It Was a Disgrace.


I am still bewildered and horrified that our society walked away from this responsibility, that we called school inessential and left each family to fend for itself. Meanwhile nurses, bus drivers and grocery workers all went to work in person — most of my students’ parents went to work in person — not because it was safe but because their work is essential. Spare me your “the kids are all right” Facebook memes. Some children may have learned to do laundry or enjoy nature during the pandemic. Many others suffered trauma and disconnection that will take years to repair.

I don’t know the first thing about public health. I won’t venture an opinion on what impact the school closures had on controlling the spread of Covid. What I do know is that the private schools in our city quickly got to work upgrading HVAC systems, putting up tents, cutting class sizes and rearranging schedules so that they could reopen in relative safety. Public schools in other states and countries did the same.
More of our public school systems should have likewise moved mountains — repurposed buildings, reassigned staff, redesigned programming, reallocated funding — to offer consistent public schooling, as safely as possible, to all children.

Instead we opened restaurants and gyms and bars while kids stayed home, or got complicated hybrid schedules that many parents turned down because they offered even less stability than virtual school. Even now, with vaccinations rising and case rates dropping, some families remain reluctant to send their kids back to us in the fall. I can’t help thinking that’s because we broke their trust.
Does virtual learning work for some kids, in some circumstances? Sure. So does home-schooling, or not attending school at all. But I am profoundly relieved that most districts, including my own, plan to shut down or restrict the online option



I quit the idea of enrolling him in summer school when I heard it will be online. He's vaccinated, got a job washing dishes so he's going to have his own money in his pocket and I hope he catches up on being a kid again. He's had enough time around me. It's time to go out and do stuff he can't tell me about.
 

schuylaar

Well-Known Member
I think of is as the the jedi mind trick troll.



It is not clever, and people don't believe it, but they are so sick and tired of the bullshit that they might not say anything because they consider the effort is wasted energy.
this has been before but not with the internet.
 

schuylaar

Well-Known Member
This essay on the tragedy of education during the pandemic was pretty good. The author shares my opinion of online learning. Last year was an effing disaster in my area. It's going to take a a while to get my youngest back on track:

I Taught Online School This Year. It Was a Disgrace.


I am still bewildered and horrified that our society walked away from this responsibility, that we called school inessential and left each family to fend for itself. Meanwhile nurses, bus drivers and grocery workers all went to work in person — most of my students’ parents went to work in person — not because it was safe but because their work is essential. Spare me your “the kids are all right” Facebook memes. Some children may have learned to do laundry or enjoy nature during the pandemic. Many others suffered trauma and disconnection that will take years to repair.

I don’t know the first thing about public health. I won’t venture an opinion on what impact the school closures had on controlling the spread of Covid. What I do know is that the private schools in our city quickly got to work upgrading HVAC systems, putting up tents, cutting class sizes and rearranging schedules so that they could reopen in relative safety. Public schools in other states and countries did the same.
More of our public school systems should have likewise moved mountains — repurposed buildings, reassigned staff, redesigned programming, reallocated funding — to offer consistent public schooling, as safely as possible, to all children.

Instead we opened restaurants and gyms and bars while kids stayed home, or got complicated hybrid schedules that many parents turned down because they offered even less stability than virtual school. Even now, with vaccinations rising and case rates dropping, some families remain reluctant to send their kids back to us in the fall. I can’t help thinking that’s because we broke their trust.
Does virtual learning work for some kids, in some circumstances? Sure. So does home-schooling, or not attending school at all. But I am profoundly relieved that most districts, including my own, plan to shut down or restrict the online option



I quit the idea of enrolling him in summer school when I heard it will be online. He's vaccinated, got a job washing dishes so he's going to have his own money in his pocket and I hope he catches up on being a kid again. He's had enough time around me. It's time to go out and do stuff he can't tell me about.
is your youngest alive?
 

Dr.Amber Trichome

Well-Known Member
This essay on the tragedy of education during the pandemic was pretty good. The author shares my opinion of online learning. Last year was an effing disaster in my area. It's going to take a a while to get my youngest back on track:

I Taught Online School This Year. It Was a Disgrace.


I am still bewildered and horrified that our society walked away from this responsibility, that we called school inessential and left each family to fend for itself. Meanwhile nurses, bus drivers and grocery workers all went to work in person — most of my students’ parents went to work in person — not because it was safe but because their work is essential. Spare me your “the kids are all right” Facebook memes. Some children may have learned to do laundry or enjoy nature during the pandemic. Many others suffered trauma and disconnection that will take years to repair.

I don’t know the first thing about public health. I won’t venture an opinion on what impact the school closures had on controlling the spread of Covid. What I do know is that the private schools in our city quickly got to work upgrading HVAC systems, putting up tents, cutting class sizes and rearranging schedules so that they could reopen in relative safety. Public schools in other states and countries did the same.
More of our public school systems should have likewise moved mountains — repurposed buildings, reassigned staff, redesigned programming, reallocated funding — to offer consistent public schooling, as safely as possible, to all children.

Instead we opened restaurants and gyms and bars while kids stayed home, or got complicated hybrid schedules that many parents turned down because they offered even less stability than virtual school. Even now, with vaccinations rising and case rates dropping, some families remain reluctant to send their kids back to us in the fall. I can’t help thinking that’s because we broke their trust.
Does virtual learning work for some kids, in some circumstances? Sure. So does home-schooling, or not attending school at all. But I am profoundly relieved that most districts, including my own, plan to shut down or restrict the online option



I quit the idea of enrolling him in summer school when I heard it will be online. He's vaccinated, got a job washing dishes so he's going to have his own money in his pocket and I hope he catches up on being a kid again. He's had enough time around me. It's time to go out and do stuff he can't tell me about.
He is lucky to have you as his father ! Happy Father’s Day, dog.
speaking of dog.... wasn67E360C1-AAA8-4ACA-93C4-3CF0498E48AE.jpegt Champ the most beautiful dog? Rip. He was such a cute puppy. I feel so bad for the Biden’s.
 

Fogdog

Well-Known Member
is your youngest alive?
we dealt with the pandemic as best we could. The first term in spring of 2020, I did not realize how badly prepared I was. I figured working from home would be enough to keep track of their online schooling. I was wrong. Eventually I went part-time at work so that I could keep track of them during the school day and help them out when they lost focus. But I was late in realizing how badly things were going that semester and both kids fell behind in their progress.

I'm not a teacher so I took online learning classes. Cooperative learning. Things are so different from when I was in HS. This year, my oldest graduated with not great grades but was accepted at the university of his choice and we'll see how it goes next year. Youngest regressed, not just in his education but socially. He still has a couple of years to go before graduation. We are seeing a counselor. Although I consider their education to be their main job, I encouraged him to get a part time job this summer in order to get him out and among people again. We're trying figure it out. Other people have had different results but for me, my kids need in-person classroom learning.
 
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Dr.Amber Trichome

Well-Known Member
Delta now accounts for 96% of new infections in the UK and in the USA it has gone from 10% to 31% in the last week, here it comes.
Very important to get that second vaccination because it’s the biggest threat to partially vaccinated individuals .
The research found that two doses of a COVID vaccine provided 81 percent protection against the B.1.617.2 variant (compared with 87 percent protection against the B.1.1.7 variant). One dose only provided 33 percent protection against symptomatic infection from B.1.617.2 (compared with 51 percent protection against B.1.1.7). That means, according to a Financial Times analysis, that a single dose is 35 percent less effective against B.1.617.2 than it is against B.1.1.7.
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schuylaar

Well-Known Member
we dealt with the pandemic as best we could. The first term in spring of 2020, I did not realize how badly prepared I was. I figured working from home would be enough to keep track of their online schooling. I was wrong. Eventually I went part-time at work so that I could keep track of them during the school day and help them out when they lost focus. But I was late in realizing how badly things were going that semester and both kids fell behind in their progress.

I'm not a teacher so I took online learning classes. Cooperative learning. Things are so different from when I was in HS. This year, my oldest graduated with not great grades but was accepted at the university of his choice and we'll see how it goes next year. Youngest regressed, not just in his education but socially. He still has a couple of years to go before graduation. We are seeing a counselor. Although I consider their education to be their main job, I encouraged him to get a part time job this summer in order to get him out and among people again. We're trying figure it out. Other people have had different results but for me, my kids need in-person classroom learning.
it's okay; it's been a big change for all of us with different outcomes because you know why.

my point was your family is safe and sound.

priorities friend:hug:
 
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