HELP! HELP! HELP!

Discussion in 'Indoor Growing' started by Tr95791, Jun 12, 2018.

  1.  
    Tr95791

    Tr95791 Member

    What's wrong with my plant Screenshot_20180612-175720.jpg
     
  2.  
    Kushash

    Kushash Well-Known Member

    With the info provided, I'll give it a shot.

    1) It's hungry, feed it.
    2) It's kept to wet, water less frequently.
    3) It doesn't like its leaves getting wet, don't splash the leaves or foliar spray.
     
  3.  
    churchhaze

    churchhaze Well-Known Member

    What's the medium? What are you feeding it?
     
  4.  
    hotrodharley

    hotrodharley Well-Known Member

    pH issue. Too young for any deficiency. And medium staying wet so roots are waterlogged
     
    Beachwalker likes this.
  5.  
    churchhaze

    churchhaze Well-Known Member

    It's not too young for deficiency.
     
  6.  
    Beachwalker

    Beachwalker Well-Known Member

    ^
     
  7.  
    hotrodharley

    hotrodharley Well-Known Member

    Yeah. It is actually until after actual physical conditions change.
     
  8.  
    hotrodharley

    hotrodharley Well-Known Member

    But go ahead and feed it. Post pics
     
  9.  
    Kushash

    Kushash Well-Known Member

    I have a hard time telling if a person is in coco or soil. What if he is in coco?
    What if he is in Fox Farm Light Warrior. I have had seedlings that size show deficiencies in light warrior if not fed.
     
    hotrodharley likes this.
  10.  
    Kushash

    Kushash Well-Known Member

    Although they were in tiny pots when I'd see deficiencies start..
     
  11.  
    churchhaze

    churchhaze Well-Known Member

    You think this yet you suggest it's a pH problem.... Why does pH cause issues in the first place?

    Unless OP tells us more about what he's growing in, there's no way to help him, however It definitely looks hungry.
     
  12.  
    JohnDee

    JohnDee Well-Known Member

    Tr95,
    I'm going to comment because your picture is a perfect teaching tool. All new growers should learn to read the plant. Since seedlings are sensitive to nutes and already have stored nutrients in the cotyledons...it is recommended to not feed until the plant "asks" for food.

    That picture shows a plant asking to be fed.
    JD
     
  13.  
    churchhaze

    churchhaze Well-Known Member

    So wait until it shows signs of deficiency? That makes absolutely no sense. The real teaching moment is to make sure your seedlings have enough nutrients so they don't end up deficient in the first place.

    RIU really needs to stop advising noobs to starve their seedlings.

    Either start with a soil built with lots of nutrition, or start your hydroponic res at what you'd feed any other age plant...
     
  14.  
    JohnDee

    JohnDee Well-Known Member

    I respectfully disagree with you ChurchHaze. So many new growers overfeed and kill seedlings. It's common horticultural practice to allow a seed to use up it's stored nutrients before starting supplementation. A plant that's a tiny bit yellow like that will green up in no time at all.
    JD
     
    Tim1987 likes this.
  15.  
    churchhaze

    churchhaze Well-Known Member

    What I tend to see is noobs coming with plants like this. It's a common horticultural practice to feed your plants and not let them turn yellow.

    A plant that didn't turn yellow in the first place would be 2-3 times the size.
     
  16.  
    churchhaze

    churchhaze Well-Known Member

    You're supposed to build your soil with enough nutrition to support the plant well throughout its life. The reason you wait to feed it is because of the uncertainty of how much nutrients the soil has left.
     
    Tim1987 likes this.
  17.  
    raggyb

    raggyb Well-Known Member

    You guys are funny. I'm not disagreeing with either of you
     
  18.  
    JohnDee

    JohnDee Well-Known Member

    Actually I'm starting to disagree with myself. I picked a poor plant siauation to make a well meaning point...and it backfired.

    It is funny when people butt heads.
    JD
     
  19.  
    Tim1987

    Tim1987 Well-Known Member

    Imho.
    A wet soil. Is a hot soil.
    More matter decomposes.
    It depends a lot on drainage, aeration and organic matter.
    Because the wetter soil is. The faster its decomposing.

    If a plant is in a fast draining soil, with good aeration.
    Has the right ph, and enough amendments from the beginning. Then the soil is staying too wet.

    I believe seedlings like a lot less green organic matter, in the beginning. (there is such a thing as hot soil)
    Otherwise its too strong for them. Its heavier matter too, and takes a longer time to dry.
    Same reason we dont keep soil always wet, with large plants. And make sure there is waste runoff every time. And drying in between.

    If a soil is fully composted. Then you shouldn't have hot soil at all.

    But im of the opinion, there is good reason for different nursery mixes.

    :peace:
     
    Beachwalker likes this.
  20.  
    Getgrowingson

    Getgrowingson Well-Known Member

    Looks to me like overwatering with combination of low nutes. Let it dry out then Water with quarter strength if your using hydro nutes. Will come around quick but let the soil dry out a bit otherwise it will get worse.
     

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