EVOLUTION, LAND RACES

Discussion in 'Advanced Marijuana Cultivation' started by Tektek, Apr 5, 2018.

  1.  
    OldMedUser

    OldMedUser Well-Known Member

    Big springs or any big fish is a lot of fun in a belly boat. Tow you around or end up running circles around you and you're sitting in the middle of the river laughing your ass off going round and round. High as a kite of course and likely 2 sheets to the wind as well.

    Always lots of coho/silvers from mid-october 'til end of Nov or later with chums/dogs starting mid-nov. Steelies would start around Xmas and good to fish to mid-march then it was kelts trying to get back to the ocean so I'd leave them alone. They are skin and bones and the stress of getting caught would kill most. Always single barbless hooks and I was doing that on my own when I was 10 so I wouldn't hurt small trout at our cabin. Law now and for a long time in BC for fresh water and I think tidal waters now too.

    Really miss fishing in the salt chuck too. There be monsters in the deeps laddie!

    :peace:
     
    18B likes this.
  2.  
    OldMedUser

    OldMedUser Well-Known Member

    Forgot about the pinks on alternate years. Big runs when they showed up and easy to catch for kids. About 5lbs max but a thrill for a kid and fun on the fly rod. Small summer runs of white spring too. Caught a 26 pounder by accident one year and the little size 6 hook on a trout spinner got right in the main vein of the gills and it was pumping out blood so I kept it tho that was a no-no. Was just going to die anyway and if I hadn't hooked it like that I never would have landed it. Very low water and he near got me around a couple big logs sticking up in the river.

    I got a picture somewhere but it might be hard copy but I have a scanner. Now to find it but not tonight. :)

    :peace:
     
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  3.  
    Lucky Luke

    Lucky Luke Well-Known Member

    Once its cultivated its no longer a land race.
     
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  4.  
    SchmoeJoe

    SchmoeJoe Well-Known Member

    I'm a big fan of single siwash hooks.
     
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  5.  
    OldMedUser

    OldMedUser Well-Known Member

    How do you figure that?

    As long as you don't cross a land race with another phenotype it's still a land race.

    It's just a domesticated land race.
     
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  6.  
    OldMedUser

    OldMedUser Well-Known Member

    I've got about a dozen different sizes of those. Most lures come with treble hooks so I curl the tips into the shaft so they won't snag anything. or snip them off if the hook is brittle, then take them off and replace with a Siwash of appropriate size. Some lures include one in the pack now but they still have a treble on the lure.

    When I was really into tying lots of flies I bought my hooks in boxes of 50 or 100 and have everything from size 32 to 2/0 3x long. Don't think I could see a size 32 anymore much less tie anything on one. :D

    A couple of months before we made the move up here I found some bugs in my fur and feathers so put them in a garbage bag with a box of moth balls and left it to kill all the bugs. During the move it must have ended up in the pile that went to the dump. Couple of thousand dollars worth of stuff I'd accumulated over 2 decades. Still hurting over that loss. Been collecting feathers from some of the chickens the wife gets and was thinking of raising exotic birds to sell feathers to shops but another idea that never came to life.

    :peace:
     
  7.  
    newgrow16

    newgrow16 Well-Known Member

    And once caught they become "Land-Race" and very nice when smoked!!
     
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  8.  
    SchmoeJoe

    SchmoeJoe Well-Known Member

    Raising specific birds for supplying fly shops is a good idea. Certain extinctions from back in the day have been attributed to specific salmon flies. You could even find a premium market for ethically raised and harvested materials.
     
  9.  
    Lucky Luke

    Lucky Luke Well-Known Member

    Because Kevin Jordrey tells me so. Domesticated land race sounds like a cultervated strain to me.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2018
  10.  
    OldMedUser

    OldMedUser Well-Known Member

    It's the same genetics and that doesn't change just because it's cultivated. I'm not impressed with YouTube hucksters myself. Who signs his paycheques?
     
  11.  
    Lucky Luke

    Lucky Luke Well-Known Member


    He does...

    Google his name or Wonderland Nursery. One of the best in the bizz and not a greedy MF like some.


    Meet the breeders is a good series he supports.
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2018
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  12.  
    OzCocoLoco

    OzCocoLoco Well-Known Member

    Once a selection has been made which invariably happens when we cultivate any type of plant then it can't be considered a landrace because a genetic bottleneck will have been formed so the genetics aren't the same
     
    giglewigle likes this.
  13.  
    OLD MOTHER SATIVA

    OLD MOTHER SATIVA Well-Known Member

    more i hear kevin talk the more i think stfu Kevvy
     
  14.  
    dabby duck

    dabby duck Well-Known Member

    Good stuff, I believe the difference lies in rainbows are considersed "landlocked" and spawn and live in freshwater, while steels are anadromous ie go out to sea and return to freshwater to spawn.

    Same distinction lies with Atlantic Red salmon and kokanee; kokanee are genetically the same, just never leave freshwater. Not all salmonids are in these categories, pretty interesting.

    @op
    Need to look thru my bookmarks and find link, but there is something like 130+ cases for different Cannabis spp. Nomenclature.

    If we are going to simplify, I say start with chemotype genotype, then phenotype as categories.

    I would like to see more data collected and used on breeding coeffiecients and someone posted something back on hardy weinberg principle, but didnt account for dioecious diploids, which is fine if you want to investigate monoecious ttraits, aka 99% or more of what are termed "herms", like hemp varieties, most of which are monoecious both fiber and seed bearing varieties.


    The Hw principle can generate allelle and genotype frequency within your pool. So if using regular filial generated seeds you must account for allele variation in dioiecious [separate male female plants and 7% of plant life, including cukes, willows, stinging nettle, hops and kanna] plants, but an interesting tool without lab analysis.

    On the horizon is chemotype solidly linked to genotype and I believe at least in commercial manufacture, phenotypical crap will be done away with, basically all foklore legends of male selection, lol.
    I see alot of mention towards phenotypical traits and personally like this method the least, it works but leads to some unneccesary dead ends. I almost never select for weight or looks, always the pharacology first...just my add.
    Stay high
     
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  15.  
    SchmoeJoe

    SchmoeJoe Well-Known Member

     
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  16.  
    dabby duck

    dabby duck Well-Known Member

    Actually what it found was that the anadromous / freshwater differentation exists, it was just that 40% of returning steelies, had some amount of rainbow genes and at one time they were separate species. They speculated on spawning stock since it wasnt all mitochondrial dna, but speculation centered around keeping the genes "freshened", basically f1 polyhybrids and that sought after vigor. I havent read the full paper in awhile, but cant remeber asection analyzing rainbows for steels dna, which raises a flag in the back of my mind...
    http://today.oregonstate.edu/archiv...w-trout-critical-health-steelhead-populations


    On top of all this, and You might not believe me , but i am an Osu alum in forestry and freshwater, originally from the Hood, River. Gilhooley mountain bred. Not that I am right either, i am more adept at bull trout and water chemistry, although my grandfather 85+ is still a working cherry rancher in the valley and we have takled at length about this issue, just recently because of the dam situation that governor has newly proposed, cluster funk, clusterfunk.
     
  17.  
    SchmoeJoe

    SchmoeJoe Well-Known Member

    My dad told me stories about being the first hippy in the hood drainage working the orchards. Some funny stories. Apparently the lockup for police confiscated property was essentially just a big tool shed. Oops.
     
  18.  
    SchmoeJoe

    SchmoeJoe Well-Known Member

    Apparently I don't have permission to post a link but this is the opening part of the article. I haven't actually read the original research paper.
    Screenshot_20180512-232606.png
     
  19.  
    Gquebed

    Gquebed Well-Known Member

    Is thread about fish or weed? Lol

    Anyway, i read a couple times now that sativas are actually indicas and vice versa.

    Apparently, there was a mistake that reversed the two in a scientific classification paper written many many years ago.

    Dunno if that is bullshit or not, but i thought i would throw it out here to see if anybody knows anything about it???
     
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  20.  
    nonamedman420

    nonamedman420 Well-Known Member

    you can drag and drop links, it's the way i get around quoting outside articles.
     

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