sinsemilla?

Discussion in 'General Marijuana Growing' started by Skateforlife6, Sep 27, 2009.

  1.  
    Skateforlife6

    Skateforlife6 Well-Known Member

    How do you get sinsemilla plants just never let any pollen get to them. i mean if you grow like 5 pants and 2 end up male and you catch it early would it affect the females at all by pollinating them even the tiniest bit. is that why some buds have almost no seeds? i was thinking about getting some seeds and growing 1 at a time so if 1 was a male it would have no chance of pollinated anything. then once i get 1 female it would be 100% sinsemilla with no seeds and only 100% of its energy be focused on thc production.then just take clones form that plant so its guaranteed female and the rest of the crop would all be sinsemilla. I hope i made sense, i think i kinda rambled.:eyesmoke:
  2.  
    Skateforlife6

    Skateforlife6 Well-Known Member

    bump? no one even looked at it? :(
  3.  
    NoDrama

    NoDrama Well-Known Member

    Thats exactly right!!

    You can usually identify and kill the male plants before they ever get to pollinate the females, then just clone the best female over and over and over.

    My bud never has a seed, because its only grown from clone of a known stable mother.
  4.  
    LUDACRIS

    LUDACRIS New Member

    Sinsemilla. by jr.f

    Sinsemilla (The word "sinsemilla" comes from the Spanish, and means "without seeds." It is also spelled "sansimilla.") is any marijuana consisting of seedless female flower buds. Sinsemilla is not a variety of marijuana; it is the seedless condition that results when the female flowers are not fertilised with pollen.
    In the United States, most sinsemilla comes in the form of Thai sticks that are imported from Southeast Asia and Japan. Thai sticks are made up of seedless buds wrapped around a sliver of bamboo or a long wooden matchstick. The buds, which may be on one or more stems, are secured with a hemp fibre wound around the stick. A growing amount of fine sinsemilla now comes from domestic sources, such as Hawaii and California. The grass is usually boxed or bagged with pure buds that are manicured (extraneous leaf removed). Infrequently sinsemilla comes from Mexico and, rarely, from Colombia.
    Sinsemilla has a reputation as high-potency marijuana, with a sweet taste and mild smoke. It doesn't have the harsh, gagging qualities of the usual Colombian and Mexican grasses. These qualities, however, have nothing to do with sinsemilla as such. The potency of any grass depends primarily on the variety and development of the plant, and the taste and mildness of the smoke depend on the condition of the plant when harvested and the cure. Heavily seeded grass can be as mild and sweet-smoking as sinsemilla when it is properly handled.
    When buying grass, remember that sinsemilla indicates a conscientious effort on the grower's part to bring you the best possible product. Sinsemilla is almost pure smoking material with no wasted weight in seeds. An ounce of sinsemilla has about twice as much smoking material as a typical seeded ounce. Also, any marijuana that is fresh, with intact buds, indicated less deterioration of cannabinoids.Sinsemilla is becoming a preferred form of grass with homegrowers, many of whom believe that a seedless female is more potent than a seeded one, reasoning that the plant's energy goes to the production of resin rather than seed. There seem to be no scientific studies on this point. Many experienced growers believe the difference is small, perhaps 10 percent.
    From observing the resin glands on the bracts, one sees that they continue to develop in size after pollination. Any difference from the unseeded state is not apparent. Whether pollination does in fact hamper or lessen resin production or potency is questionable. but the effect on the plant as a whole can be dramatic. Usually when the female is well-pollinated, growth noticeably slows, and the plant enters the last phase of life, which is seed set. Seed set is a period of incubation, in which the seeds grow and reach their mature state. New growth forms more slowly and lack the vitality of the bloom before pollination. The plant's reaction to pollination is relative. The more thoroughly pollinated the female is, the more pronounced the change in rhythm from vigorous to incubation. A plant on which only a few flowers have been fertilised continues to actively form flowers as sinsemilla.
    Not all plants react alike to pollination. When the weather is good and the plant vigorous, even a well-seeded plant may bloom a second or third time before the rate of growth starts a final decline.
    To put this in perspective, the main advantage to growing sinsemilla is that the plant remains in a flowering state for a longer period of time. Flowers may rapidly form for four to ten weeks. The flower buds develop larger and more thickly along the stems, yielding more top-quality grass (more buds) than in the seeded condition.
    Anyone can grow sinsemilla. Simply remove the male plants before they release pollen. Given a normal spring planting, males usually flowers in August and September, but may being to flower as early as mid-July. Under artificial lights, males sometimes flower after only three months, and before the grower has shortened the photoperiod. Even though the females are not flowering, remove the males from the room before any flowers open. Indoor, the pollen will collect as dust and can fertilise the females weeks later.
    Male flowers mature quickly, in about one to two weeks after the immature buds are first visible. Check each plant about twice a week to make sure you harvest all the males before any shed pollen.Even though you may not get all the males, the females will be more lightly seeded. Actually, even in carefully watched gardens, the females may have a few seeds. Pollination may come from on occasional male flower on a basically female plant, or a female may reverse and form male flowers. And pollen may come from a neighbour's garden, a problem that is becoming more common. But in practical terms, an occasional seed makes no difference. The female can form thousands of flowers, and when only a few are pollinated, there is little impact on the plant's growth.


    LUDACRIS.
    :roll:
  5.  
    Skateforlife6

    Skateforlife6 Well-Known Member

    Thanks for the quick reply guys. cant wait to grow some Sinsemilla bud!

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