Pot good for Schizophrenia!

Discussion in 'Medical Marijuana News' started by ford442, May 26, 2010.

  1.  
    ford442

    ford442 Well-Known Member

    i suffer from schizophrenia and this is very good news to me..! :)
    i will wait a while for this news to sink in to the medical community then i think i will see a doctor about a prescription for help with my symptoms.. :joint:

    http://blog.norml.org/2010/05/26/la...renia-runs-contrary-to-mainstream-media-hype/

    Latest Research On Pot and Schizophrenia Runs Contrary to Mainstream Media Hype

    May 26th, 2010 By: Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director

    The mainstream media loves to spill ink hyping the allegation that marijuana causes mental illness, particularly schizophrenia. In fact, it was in March when international media outlets declared that cannabis use ‘doubled’ one’s risk of developing the disease. Yet when research appears in scientific journals rebuking just this sort of ‘reefer madness,’ it generally goes unreported.


    Such is the case with a pair of just-published studies slated to appear in the journal Schizophrenia Research. The first study, conducted by a team of researchers at various New York state hospitals, the Yale University School of Medicine, and the National Institutes of Mental Health assessed whether there exists a causal association between cannabis use and the age of onset of psychosis in patients hospitalized for the first time for an episode of schizophrenia.


    Despite previous media claims to the contrary, researchers concluded:
    “Although the onset of cannabis use disorder preceded the onset of illness in most patients, our findings suggest that age at onset of psychosis was not associated with cannabis use disorders. Previous studies implicating cannabis use disorders in schizophrenia may need to more comprehensively assess the relationship between cannabis use disorders and schizophrenia, and take into account the additional variables that we found associated with cannabis use disorders.”


    A separate study slated for publication in the same journal assessed the cognitive skills of schizophrenic patients with a history of cannabis use compared to non-users. Authors reported that patients with a history of marijuana use “demonstrated significantly better performance on measures of processing speed, verbal fluency, and verbal learning and memory” compared to abstainers. Marijuana use was also associated with better overall GAF (Global Assessment of Functioning) scores compared to those of non-users.


    Authors concluded: “The results of the present analysis suggest that (cannabis use) in patients with SZ (schizophrenia) is associated with better performance on measures of processing speed and verbal skills. These data are consistent with prior reports indicating that SZ patients with a history of CUD (cannabis use disorders) have less severe cognitive deficits than SZ patients without comorbid CUD. … The present findings also suggest that CUD in patients with SZ may not differentially affect the severity of illness as measured by clinical symptomatology.”
    Both study’s findings are in line with previous (though virtually unreported) research indicating that marijuana is unlikely to instigate incidences of schizophrenia in the general population, that cannabis use among patients with the disease is associated with higher cognitive function, and that at least some schizophrenics find subjective relief from symptoms of the illness by using pot. Nonetheless, odds are the nobody from the mainstream media will be champing at the bit to report on them.


    Bottom line: marijuana’s complex relationship with schizophrenia is far from understood, and likely won’t be for some time. But that doesn’t give the MSM a free pass to only promote one side of the story.


    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Cannabis Use May "Improve" Brain Function In Schizophrenics, Study Says[/FONT]



    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] May 17, 2007 - Berlin, Germany

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    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Berlin, Germany: Cannabis use is associated with improved cognition in schizophrenic patients, according to clinical trial data to be published in the journal Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry. [/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Investigators at the University of Berlin assessed the impact of cannabis on cognitive functions in schizophrenic patients who reported prior use of pot versus patients who reported no history of substance abuse. Researchers reported that cannabis use was not associated with any decline in cognition, and that those subjects who reported using marijuana prior to their first psychotic episode showed improved cognitive performance on certain tests compared to non-users.
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    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]"[T]o our surprise, cannabis abusing schizophrenic patients … achieved results either similar to those [achieved] by the non-using cannabis schizophrenic patients or, at times, performed even better than them," investigators concluded. "[R]ather than deteriorating neuropsychological performance, cannabis [use] prior to [a patient’s] first psychotic episode improved cognition in some tests."[/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]According to the study’s authors, cognitive dysfunctions are present in more than 80 percent of patients diagnosed with schizophrenia.[/FONT]
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    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]A separate 2005 study by investigators at Manchester Metropolitan University in Britain previously reported that schizophrenic patients who consumed cannabis prior to disease onset possessed greater cognitive skills after ten years than did non-users.[/FONT]
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    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Neurocognitive studies performed on healthy volunteers generally report that the use of marijuana, even long-term, is not associated with any significant or long-lasting declines in cognitive function.
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    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Patients With Schizophrenia Report Subjective Benefits From Marijuana, Study Says[/FONT]



    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] May 6, 2010 - New Brunswick, Canada

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    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]New Brunswick, Canada:[/FONT][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] Male patients diagnosed with schizophrenia report obtaining subjective benefits from marijuana, according to survey data published in the March issue of the Canadian Journal of Nursing Research.[/FONT][/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] Investigators from Edmundston Regional Hospital, Psychiatry/Mental Health Department in New Brunswick, Canada surveyed eight men with schizophrenia who had a history of current or past cannabis use.[/FONT][/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]
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    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] Researchers reported that subjects consumed marijuana "as a means of satisfying the schizophrenia-related need for relaxation, sense of self-worth, and distraction."[/FONT][/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] Survey data published in 2008 in the International Journal of Mental Health Nursing also reported that many schizophrenic patients obtain relief from cannabis, finding that subjects consumed cannabis to reduce anxiety, mitigate memories of childhood trauma, enhance cognition, and "improve their mental state."[/FONT][/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]
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    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] The findings may help to provide insight as to why several recent studies have identified a non-causal association between the use of marijuana and schizophrenia.[/FONT][/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif] [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]For more information, please contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: [email protected]. Full text of the study, "Attraction to cannabis among men with schizophrenia: a phenomenological study," appears in the Canadian Journal of Nursing Research.[/FONT][/FONT]
  2.  
    deprave

    deprave New Member

    This is pretty interesting subject matter for me as a therapist who treats many cases of schizophrenia, A medical marijuana community member, and as someone who is pro-legilization. I have to say that I do agree with the study but that the study seems biast twoard marijuana, sure these benifits that this study has found are indeed true as I have witnessed them myself but it ignores the negative impact that marijuana can have on some people with shizophrenia.

    It is important to keep in mind I work with only severe cases with people in crisis so that influences my experiences quite a bit, often times I have found that marijuana can increase hallucinations both auditory and visual and increase severity of depression, and/or anxiety, and/or paranoia, and/or delusions.

    I would never recommend for anyone with severe schizophrenia in a time of crisis to use marijuana but I think it could help some, it does indeed improve cognitive functions as evidenced in this study.

    I think marijuana could be a good solution for long term treatment of schizophrena for someone that has a good solid baseline and has their illness under control, for a patient that has good ADLS and high functioning medical marijuana would help them out substanstially again as evidenced in this study in addition to their normal medications.

    As far as the studies which link the early onset of schizophrenia with marijuana use, these type of studies give me a good chuckle. Its easy to point fingers at pretty much anything leading to an early onset of shizophrenia because shizophrenia typically begins to manifest itself in the late teens and early twenties so its easy to point fingers and blame anything from nicotine to caffiene to marijuana to LSD. It is even easier to blame a drug because drug use has so many simuliarities to mental illness (example: If I took LSD on a normal basis as a teen and than in my twenties I am diagnosed with shizophrenia it would appear as if the LSD could have caused or even contributed to my schizophrenia when one examines my history and it would be very easy to establish many links between the two).

    I have witnessed time and time again that the best treatment for shizophrenia for most people is these "long acting" injections or implants most psychiatrist use rispordol, even the most severe cases I have witnessed people become essentially cured of their illness. These medications can have some severe side effects in some cases such as involuntary muscle movements but I think for a lot of people the benifit does outweigh the side effects. I am no psychiatrist but I think that marijuana could be used in conjuction with these injections in a time where symptoms of 'disorganized thoughts', rapid speech, or really any cognitive impairments return. (I.E. The anti-psychotic isnt helping enough so try smoking a joint to get yourself to relax) The best time for this I would think would be before bed and possibly only if your having a hard time sleeping. ---Atleast if I was a psychiatrist and treating with medical marijuana that is how I would do it----
  3.  
    ford442

    ford442 Well-Known Member

    in the past i have blamed myself for bringing on my condition up until my doctor explained that it simply was not the case..
    i don't take this article as an endorsement for treating SZ solely with pot - though there is evidence that CBD by itself can be an effective anti-psychotic..
    to clarify - i am already on Zyprexa for some years now - i just feel like pot helps me to have a satisfactory time in the world.. the pills give me the ability to interact with life, but weed makes it honestly enjoyable in times where i could otherwise spend days in a depressive state..
    i guess i have been self medicating for years and i am still not fully aware of it..
  4.  
    deprave

    deprave New Member

    Well if it works for you man, I was just about to ask you if it works for you? How it works for you? and how do you use it to work for you??? What is the negative and positive side of things...I think using it like you do in addition to another anti-psychotic is the best path, it would be nice to kick the anti-psychotics completly but I dont think we have found the answer on how to do that with solely marijuana just yet..perhaps higher doses of strains that are particuliarly high in CBD - different dosing methods and preperations...etc...its possible marijuana can act as a very good medicine for schizophrenia if we could establish the best regiment. (but ofcourse everyone is different so by best I mean 'common')
  5.  
    ford442

    ford442 Well-Known Member

    "[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]patients obtain relief from cannabis, finding that subjects consumed cannabis to reduce anxiety, mitigate memories of childhood trauma, enhance cognition, and "improve their mental state." "

    this describes it better than i can.. i get relaxed even if something uncomfortable is happening.. in my years of smoking i definitely recall going over my childhood with detail and resolving painful thoughts associated with early issues.. i sometimes feel like i have more detailed learning and comprehension of things when i smoke.. and my mental state is always improved by pot..
    at one point i took 4 years away from weed.. i felt ok, but it was very uneventful mentally.. when i started up again i felt some paranoia, but i got used to the feeling and the fear reaction went away..
    i have smoked since i was 14 in 1993.. weed has always brought me relief from the pains of the world..
    i am having a pretty hard time pointing out the bad side here... even if there are negative points i am missing - at least i have not turned to alcohol or opiates to self medicate...

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  6.  
    canniboss

    canniboss Active Member

  7.  
    ford442

    ford442 Well-Known Member

    i cannot view that video - it is blocked to non-canadains..
    but if that is the premise then it has been proven wrong many times - every doctor i have talked to agrees that schizophrenia is a hereditary disorder - it cannot be brought on by anything other than genetic wiring..
  8.  
    canniboss

    canniboss Active Member

    I'm not a doctor, but I smoke lots of pot and I'm kinda crazy.
    I'm pretty sure you can find it on google somewhere, it's interesting and well made, It has a definite "use at you own risk" vibe. Worth watching if you find this sort of thing interesting.
  9.  
    deprave

    deprave New Member

    schizophrenia is a hereditary - like I said its easy to blame anything on being a possible cause for schizophrenia as it most often comes in the late teens and early twenties. There has been no studies that prove without a shadow of a doubt that anything besides genetics is the cause. It is especially easy to blame substance abuse because people typically use drugs in their teens and early twenties and substance abuse is so closely linked with someones mental health.
  10.  
    ford442

    ford442 Well-Known Member

    there have been studies which show that when a populace has a marked increase of cannabis use there is not a corresponding increase in the diagnosis of schizophrenia in that region..
    Sr. Verde likes this.
  11.  
    Sr. Verde

    Sr. Verde Well-Known Member

    This is good news. Sometimes I fear I am a schizophrenic. Some days I feel like a totally different person inside.
  12.  
    deprave

    deprave New Member

    that doesnt sound like schizophrenia
  13.  
    ataxia

    ataxia Well-Known Member

    very interesting post. Great points made in the study..... I DO think it depends on what sort of schizophrenia disorder you have. I've know a few people with delusional problems ... pot never works good for them. They over analyze everything. Of course it all depends on the user. But imo. If you're an extra paranoid person with a mental ( delusions, certain types of mania, or even depression problems) maybe pot isn't right for them.
    the only reason i'm chiming in is because i think there are many more people with mental disorders ( schizophrenia, anxiety, depression, ocd, etc.) than admit. Myself included.. i have to be in the right environment to smoke great ganja due to panic/anxiety disorders. But i've seen some people with moderate to severe mental disorders who DO NOT take well to cannabis. Just brings out their paranoia WAY more. and if it leads to analyzing .. some people get a bit too creative thinking that people are against them, things are happening that aren't... blah .. sorry ... i'm fucking stoned.
    but my point is. and of course you all may disagree. Pot is not the first choice for people with severe mental disorders. I believe it can exacerbate the problem in some cases.
  14.  
    ford442

    ford442 Well-Known Member

    for sure true - but, it is not so difficult for the individual to find out for themselves if weed helps them or hinders them.. with regulation and education people can make the informed decision depending on their health..
    ganjaluvr likes this.
  15.  
    ganjaluvr

    ganjaluvr Well-Known Member

    that's called a personality disorder or possibly could even be BiPolar.. which is a personality disorder that quite a few adults actually have. I think 60% of humans on Earth actually have the disorder, but an even higher percentage of them don't even know that they have it.

    I'm not sure what it is that I have, other than anxiety and panic attacks (they're no fun...) but I'm prescribed Xanex for those problems and it works
    really well. :)

    But, I think I even have a slight problem upstairs too.. other than the anxiety and panic attacks. I think I might be borderline 'Bipolar'.. if that makes any sense at all...?... anyhow the brain doctor put me on 20mgs of Prozac and like 150mgs of TRI-Lip-i-tol (Trilipitol). But I don't really see any difference of how I feel when I don't take them versus when i do take them... I dunno...

    I'm going to go check out the tv and see if anything worth watching is on now.

    peace.
  16.  
    grapesnowcone

    grapesnowcone Well-Known Member

    They are developing a new strain that is low in THC and high in cannabinoids, which are used to treat schizophrenia.. because a lot of patients feel the high from potent bud is "undesirable"..
  17.  
    Near

    Near Active Member

    It's probably not a disorder and just totally usual. Most people have conflicting feelings and feel very different from time to time. If it is a disorder I would have to say it sounds most like split personality disorder.

    The reason he suspected schizophrenia is almost certainly because the term is widely misinterpreted. For whatever reason schizophrenia has become one of the most misunderstood English words. Most people think it's the same as split personality disorder when in actuality there's almost no connection at all. So he was probably saying that he believes he has split personality disorder.

    Don't know where you got that number from. It's way, way, way too high. And if an even higher percentage don't know they have it, that would mean the 60 percent are aware of it. There's no way on Earth 60% of all people identify themselves as bipolar.
  18.  
    ganjaluvr

    ganjaluvr Well-Known Member

    So then, I a had a friend that ended up in a mental hospital. He now belongs to the state.. but it doesn't matter. He's on a trip for the rest of his life.

    The idiot ran from the cops (around 8 years ago) because he had 2 sheets of paper acid in his back pocket folded into sections. Well, then he ends up running through someones yard and they had their sprinkler systems on and he got fucking drenched... and yeah, needless to say the sheets got wet and then leaked into his wet skin. Dude's on a perm. mental trip...

    guess my point here.. or question would be, does he qualify for being a skitzo?
  19.  
    ford442

    ford442 Well-Known Member

    like i was saying - schizophrenia is a very specific and hereditary condition - you cannot get it by ingesting drugs or getting hit on the head or electrocuted or anything.. it is more like part of my brain grew wrong and has a leaky pipe spilling nonsense into my brain.. multiple doctors have assured me that my past drug use has nothing to do with my condition..
  20.  
    Near

    Near Active Member

    I don't believe that but no, it wouldn't qualify. I don't see how that's relevant to the question of how many people have the disorder though. You must know it's not 60%, half of that, or anywhere near it.

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