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Oil or Butter

Discussion in 'Cooking With Cannabis' started by yung420, Jan 3, 2013.

  1.  
    yung420

    yung420 Active Member

    Well for one I wanna say sorry if I'm posting this in the wrong section but I was wondering what to do with my trim. I have about 30 to 35 of trim and was curious what would yield more, potency, etc. I was going to use the dry ice hash method also and if I do go with the butter, how many sticks to use. Thanks in advance.
  2.  
    gioua

    gioua Well-Known Member

    30-35 lbs or grams or oz??

    rule of thumb is 1 lbs butter (1 cup oil) to 1 oz trim. Other rules are... .25 g per edible is making 30 cookies use 7.5g bud is using hash or kief or other concentrates use .5-.7 gs per edible 30 cookies would be about 1.5-2.5 hash

    I prefer to use oil but recently used butter for canna caps and worked just fine
    burns temps



    [TABLE="width: 94%, align: center"]
    [TR]
    [TD]Fats or Oils
    [/TD]
    [TD]Description
    [/TD]
    [TD]Cooking Uses
    [/TD]
    [TD]Type of Fat
    [/TD]
    [TD]Smoke Point °F
    [/TD]
    [TD]Smoke Point °C
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]Almond Oil
    [/TD]
    [TD]
    Has a subtle toasted almond aroma and flavor.

    [/TD]
    [TD]Used in sauté and stir fry of Oriental foods.
    [/TD]
    [TD]Monounsaturated
    [/TD]
    [TD]420°F
    [/TD]
    [TD]216°C
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]Avocado Oil
    [/TD]
    [TD]
    Vibrant green in color with a has a soft nutty taste and a mild avocado aroma. This is a very healthy oil with a profile similar to olive oil. This oil can be used for very high temperature applications.

    [/TD]
    [TD]Stir frying, searing
    [/TD]
    [TD]Monounsaturated
    [/TD]
    [TD]520°F
    [/TD]
    [TD]271°C
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]Butter
    [/TD]
    [TD]
    Whole butter is a mix of fats, milk solids, and moisture derived by churning cream until the oil droplets stick together and can be separated out.

    [/TD]
    [TD]Baking, cooking
    [/TD]
    [TD]Saturated
    [/TD]
    [TD]350°F
    [/TD]
    [TD]177°C
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]Butter (Ghee), clarified
    [/TD]
    [TD]
    Ghee has a higher smoke point than butter since clarification eliminates the milk solids (which burn at lower temps).

    [/TD]
    [TD]Frying, sauteing
    [/TD]
    [TD]Saturated
    [/TD]
    [TD]375-485°F (depending on purity)
    [/TD]
    [TD]190-250°C (depending on purity),
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]
    Canola Oil (Rapeseed oil)

    [/TD]
    [TD]A light, golden-colored oil.
    [/TD]
    [TD]Good all-purpose oil. Used in salads and cooking.
    [/TD]
    [TD]Monounsaturated
    [/TD]
    [TD]400°F
    [/TD]
    [TD]204°C
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]Coconut Oil
    [/TD]
    [TD]
    A heavy nearly colorless oil extracted from fresh coconuts.

    [/TD]
    [TD]coatings, confectionary, shortening
    [/TD]
    [TD]Saturated
    [/TD]
    [TD]350°F
    [/TD]
    [TD]177°C
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]Corn Oil
    [/TD]
    [TD]
    A mild, medium-yellow color refined oil. Made from the germ of the corn kernel.

    [/TD]
    [TD]Frying, salad dressings, shortening
    [/TD]
    [TD]Polyunsaturated
    [/TD]
    [TD]450°F
    [/TD]
    [TD]232°C
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]Cottonseed Oil
    [/TD]
    [TD]
    Pale-yellow oil that is extracted from the seed of the cotton plant.

    [/TD]
    [TD]Margarine, salad dressings, shortening. Also used for frying.
    [/TD]
    [TD]Polyunsaturated
    [/TD]
    [TD]420°F
    [/TD]
    [TD]216°C
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]Grapeseed Oil
    [/TD]
    [TD]Light, medium-yellow oil that is a by-product of wine making.
    [/TD]
    [TD]
    Excellent choice of cooking oil for sautéing or frying. Also used in salad dressings.

    [/TD]
    [TD]Polyunsaturated
    [/TD]
    [TD]392°F
    [/TD]
    [TD]200°C
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]Hazelnut Oil
    [/TD]
    [TD]
    The nuts are ground and roasted and then pressed in a hydraulic press to extract the delicate oil.

    [/TD]
    [TD]Salad dressings, marinades and baked goods.
    [/TD]
    [TD]Monounsaturated

    [/TD]
    [TD]430°F
    [/TD]
    [TD]221°C
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]Lard
    [/TD]
    [TD]
    The white solid or semi-solid rendered fat of a hog. This was once the most popular cooking and baking fat, but has been replaced by vegetable shortenings.

    [/TD]
    [TD]Baking and frying
    [/TD]
    [TD]Saturated
    [/TD]
    [TD]370°F
    [/TD]
    [TD]182 °C
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]Macadamia Nut Oil
    [/TD]
    [TD]
    This oil is cold pressed from the decadent macadamia nut, extracting a light oil similar in quality to the finest extra virgin olive oil.

    [/TD]
    [TD]Saute, pan fry, sear, deep fry, stir fry, grill, broil, baking.
    [/TD]
    [TD]Monounsaturated

    [/TD]
    [TD]390°F
    [/TD]
    [TD]199 °C
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]Olive Oil
    [/TD]
    [TD]
    Oils vary in weight and may be pale yellow to deep green depending on fruit used and processing.

    [/TD]
    [TD]cooking, salad dressings, saute, pan fry, sear, deep fry, stir fry, grill, broil, baking
    [/TD]
    [TD]Monounsaturated
    [/TD]
    [TD]Extra Virgin - 320°F
    Virgin - 420°F
    Pomace - 460°F
    Extra Light - 468°F
    [/TD]
    [TD]160°C
    216°C
    238°C
    242°C
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]Palm Oil
    [/TD]
    [TD]
    A yellowish-orange fatty oil obtained especially from the crushed nuts of an African palm.

    [/TD]
    [TD]Cooking, flavoring
    [/TD]
    [TD]Saturated
    [/TD]
    [TD]446°F
    [/TD]
    [TD]230°C
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]Peanut Oil
    [/TD]
    [TD]
    Pale yellow refined oil with a very subtle scent and flavor. Made from pressed steam-cooked peanuts. Used primarily in Asian cooking.

    [/TD]
    [TD]Frying, cooking, salad dressings
    [/TD]
    [TD]Monounsaturated
    [/TD]
    [TD]450°F
    [/TD]
    [TD]232°C
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]Rice Bran Oil
    [/TD]
    [TD]
    Rice bran oil is produced from the rice bran, which is removed from the grain of rice as it is processed.

    [/TD]
    [TD]Frying, sauté, salad dressings, baking, dipping oils
    [/TD]
    [TD]Monounsaturated
    [/TD]
    [TD]490°F
    [/TD]
    [TD]254°C
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]Safflower Oil
    [/TD]
    [TD]
    A golden color with a light texture. Made from the seeds of safflowers.

    [/TD]
    [TD]Margarine, mayonnaise, salad dressings
    [/TD]
    [TD]Polyunsaturated
    [/TD]
    [TD]450°F
    [/TD]
    [TD]232°C
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]Sesame Oil
    [/TD]
    [TD]
    Comes in two types - a light, very mild Middle Eastern type and a darker Asian type pressed from toasted sesame seeds.

    [/TD]
    [TD]Cooking, salad dressings
    [/TD]
    [TD]Polyunsaturated
    [/TD]
    [TD]410°F
    [/TD]
    [TD]232°C
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]Shortening, Vegetable
    [/TD]
    [TD]
    Blended oil solidified using various processes, including whipping in air and hydrogenation. May have real or artificial butter flavor added.

    [/TD]
    [TD]Baking, frying
    [/TD]
    [TD]Saturated
    [/TD]
    [TD]360°F
    [/TD]
    [TD]182 °C
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]Soybean Oil
    [/TD]
    [TD]
    A fairly heavy oil with a pronounced flavor and aroma.

    [/TD]
    [TD]Margarine, salad dressings, shortening
    [/TD]
    [TD]Polyunsaturated
    [/TD]
    [TD]450°F
    [/TD]
    [TD]232°C
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]Sunflower Oil
    [/TD]
    [TD]
    A light odorless and nearly flavorless oil pressed from sunflower seeds. Pale yellow.

    [/TD]
    [TD]Cooking, margarine, salad dressings, shortening
    [/TD]
    [TD]Polyunsaturated
    [/TD]
    [TD]450°F
    [/TD]
    [TD]232°C
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]Vegetable Oil
    [/TD]
    [TD]
    Made by blending several different refined oils. Designed to have a mild flavor and a high smoke point.

    [/TD]
    [TD]Cooking, salad dressings
    [/TD]
    [TD]Polyunsaturated
    [/TD]
    [TD]
    [/TD]
    [TD]
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]Walnut Oil
    [/TD]
    [TD]
    Medium-yellow oil with a nutty flavor and aroma. More perishable than most other oils.

    [/TD]
    [TD]Saute, pan fry, sear, deep fry, stir fry, grill, broil
    [/TD]
    [TD]Monounsaturated
    [/TD]
    [TD]400°F
    [/TD]
    [TD]204°C
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [/TABLE]
  3.  
    gioua

    gioua Well-Known Member



    Which is better: monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fats?




    Both types of unsaturated fat-monounsaturated and polyunsaturated -can offer important health benefits. We know from studies involving the Mediterranean diet-where intake of olive oil is especially high -that monounsaturates can be heart protective. (Olive oil has the highest level of monounsaturated fat of any commonly used oil.) With polyunsaturates, there is also evidence of decreased risk of chronic disease, but only when the diet is also relatively high quality and accompanied by healthy intake of antioxidant nutrients.
    The reason we need plenty of antioxidants when we eat polyunsaturates is simple: the more unsaturated a fat is, the more delicate it becomes. Heat and oxygen are more damaging to polyunsaturated fats than to monounsaturated ones. This situation is problematic for highly polyunsaturated plant oils because they have lost the antioxidant protection that was originally supplied by their whole food origins (i.e., beans, seeds, or nuts). At the World's Healthiest Foods, we encourage consumption of many whole foods that contain large amounts of polyunsaturated fat, but we do not encourage consumption of high-polyunsaturate oils that have been processed from these exact same foods! Oils processed from whole foods do not have the same protection from heat and oxygen that whole foods have-too many antioxidant nutrients have been lost during processing.
    Due to the problems with heat damage to oils that are high in polyunsaturates, many companies offer oils that would ordinarily be high in polyunsaturates, but in fact contain much fewer-than-expected polyunsaturates and much higher-than-expected monounsaturates. These oils are produced from plants that have been hybridized (not genetically engineered) to contain more monounsaturated fat in their beans or seeds. Since most of this monounsaturated fat comes from oleic acid (one of the most common monounsaturated fatty acids found in food), these oils are usually called "high-oleic oils." You can buy high-oleic sunflower, safflower, and corn oil in many grocery stores. If you plan to use cooking oils at high heat, these high-oleic versions can be a good choice.
  4.  
    yung420

    yung420 Active Member

    30 to 35 grams, sorry. And thanks for that...very informative
  5.  
    Krondizzel

    Krondizzel New Member

    dry ice hash is awesome! :D
  6.  
    yung420

    yung420 Active Member

    How much do you think I'll yield with 30 to 35 grams of trim for dry ice hash ???
  7.  
    gioua

    gioua Well-Known Member

    a 10% yield would be above avg.. so 3.5 4 max with Primo Buds...

    trim.. I'd guess about 2g tops..
  8.  
    yung420

    yung420 Active Member

    Cool to know. What's the deal with freezing trim/buds before use.
  9.  
    gioua

    gioua Well-Known Member

    saves me the step of taking out my Ninja food processor to chop it all up.. I open the mason jar after it's frozen.. stick a wooden spoon inside stir takes 1 mins to grind it..
  10.  
    yung420

    yung420 Active Member

    I have mine in a Ziploc is that ok or should I put em in a jar
  11.  
    gioua

    gioua Well-Known Member

    nah I keep all of mine in jars in a dark cold area .. then when I make oil take one and place in freezer for 60+ mins..
  12.  
    potpimp

    potpimp Sector 5 Moderator

    The ice and freezing temps freeze the little trichromes. When stirred or agitated in a bucket of ice water, the trichs break off and get caught in the "bubble bag". The low number bags catch the green stuff, allowing the trichs to go through several increasingly finer mesh bags. The last little bit will result in a beautiful blonde hash of the best quality. There will also be additional hash in the lower mesh bags.
  13.  
    gioua

    gioua Well-Known Member

    This above is for making ICE water hash with bubble bags .. good advice but not the reason the freezing in my case was done... once it become frozen the buds are very brittle and really easy to pulverize them at this stage (beats pulling out the chopper)
  14.  
    potpimp

    potpimp Sector 5 Moderator

    Why do you pulverize the leaves??? There's nothing good in the leaves.

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