Gourmet Chefs In Denver Take Marijuana To New High

Discussion in 'Marijuana News From Around The Globe' started by GreenSurfer, Dec 19, 2009.

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    GreenSurfer

    GreenSurfer Well-Known Member

    DENVER — Any slacker living over his parents’ garage can make pot brownies. Gourmet chefs are taking the art of cooking with marijuana to a higher level.

    In Denver, a new medical-marijuana shop called Ganja Gourmet serves cannabis-infused specialties such as pizza, hummus and lasagna. Across town in the Mile-High City, a Caribbean restaurant plans to offer classes on how to make multi-course meals with pot in every dish.

    And in Southern California, a low-budget TV show called “Cannabis Planet” has won fans with a cooking segment showing viewers how to use weed in teriyaki chicken, shrimp capellini and steak sandwiches.

    The evolution of pot cooking was perhaps inevitable given the explosion of medical marijuana around the country in recent years. Many health-conscious patients would rather eat the drug than smoke it.

    “When I started using marijuana, I was eating a brownie every day. I gained a ton of weight,” said Michael DeLao, a former hotel chef who hosts the “Cannabis Planet” cooking segments on Los Angeles’ KJLA. “Then I learned how to really cook with marijuana, and once more people learn about all the possibilities, we’re going to see a lot more people wanting this in their food.”

    Ganja Gourmet’s menu includes lasagna (“LaGanja”), “Panama Red Pizza” and an olive tapenade called “ganjanade,” along with sweets such as cheesecake, muffins and brownies. Employees wear tie-dyed T-shirts that proclaim, “Our food is so great, you need a license to eat it!!!”

    All patrons at the Ganja Gourmet must show a medical marijuana card that proves they have a doctor’s permission to use pot for some kind of malady.

    The place opened last week, and so far, 90 percent of its business has been takeout.

    The food isn’t cheap. A whole pizza sells for $89, and a dozen sweet treats called Almond Horns cost $120.

    “The food is really good,” said Jamie Hillyer, a 41-year-old medical marijuana patient who paid $12 for a serving of vegetable LaGanja. Hillyer said that he can’t taste the weed in the food and that it gives him a “more mellow” buzz than smoking pot.

    Chefs are able to use marijuana in cooking because its key ingredient, the mind-altering drug THC, is fat-soluble, meaning it binds with oils or fats.
  2.  
    tical916

    tical916 Well-Known Member


    Wow I don't know $120 for some almond horns. That better be some damn good weed in there.

    We have been doing this forever, basically anything that requires butter or is fat soluble can be made "Special".

    I could go for a weed induced Philly Cheese Steak. You would need another one to cover the munchies though... It'd be an endless cycle.

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