DIY flood and drain table.

Discussion in 'Do It Yourself' started by VictorVIcious, Aug 7, 2007.

  1.  
    VictorVIcious

    VictorVIcious Well-Known Member

    Well, those of you that know me realize I'm not a computer guy so this may take a while. The only reason to build your own table is if you can't buy one to fit the space you have. The first table I used was purchased from the local hydro shop. It's 1 meter square, 20 station drip system and came with everything, except an air pump and a cover for the resevior. And I do mean everything, coco, nutes and ph drops. Cost $250.00 and well worth it. The seperate components would be that much without the frame. Problem with it is the size. 40" x 4 would be too big for the area I have and the resevoir sits in front of the table so no adjustments I could think of would help. I knew I could follow the blueprint (the table sitting there) soo.....then I ran into AL B Fuct's journal "How to get a harvest every two weeks". Caught my attention and I deciced to try it. It require four tables in flowering and a flood and drian system. He gets a harvest of 13-16 oz every two weeks. Enough said.
    Soo....I went to the lumber yard and got the following,
    2-8' 2x10's
    6-8' 2x4's
    1- 4'by8' 1/2 plywood, good one side. I had them make two cuts across the plywood, giving me thre 32" by 48" pieces. So I alreay have the plywood for two more tables.
    I also got POND LINER. They have it in all different sizes or by the linear ft. The better quality one the had is 15' long. I bought 4-linear ft. again giving me enough to do two more tables. The fourth one is still in progress.
    Because of the space I have (long story) I also bought 4-swivel casters and two stationary caster.
    Flood and Drain fittings were purchased at the local Hydro Shop, less than $20.00, along with 2- 1/2" shut off valves and 1- 1/2"by1/2"by1/2" tee.
    The other plumbing parts are for my convenience and are not necessary, you wouldn't really need two shut-off valves either, I just thing its cool and it is more convenient so I justfied the extra $20.00. I bought two push elbows at Menards along with a 40 gallon resevoir ($13.99)
    I already had some little electrical mounts and wire ties. I had plenty of screws from a couple of deck building projects. a 25# box of deck screws is about the same cost as 3-5# boxes. If you don't have any you will need to buy a 5# box of 2-1/2" deck screws. The grade just below stainless steel will work, about $25.00.
    This table will end up being 35" wide by 51" long with inside demensions of 32" by 48". You could put 24- 1 gallon pots on it, I going with 20 and a 600 watt equivalent light. My yield from the first crop in this table was just under 500grams from those 20 plants.
    Then I made my cuts. Stay with me Major.
    2-48" 2x10's (length)
    2-35" 2x10's (width)
    14-32" 2x4's (10 for legs and 4 for cross braces.)
    2-45" 2x4's (Braces for lenght)
    4-14" 2x4's (corner leg stabilizers)
    2-14 1/2" 2x4's (center leg stablizers)
    Procedure:
    Fasten the width boards to the end of the lenght boards.
    For the corner legs fasten two 32" long 2x4's at right angles. Mark off 4" and attach to the table frame leaving 28" of leg exposed.
    Install the lenght stabilizers 14" from the bottom of the legs. Install width braces, one on each end, just inside the corner legs and 2-4" apart (2"from center) this gives you the room for the flood and drain fittings.
    Mark the center legs off 3 1/2" and install leaving 28 1/2" exposed.
    Install corner leg stabilizers.
    Install center leg stabilizers.
    Install swivel casters on the corner legs.
    Install stationary caster on the center legs.
    Turn the wobbly table over. You will notice it kinda rocks from end to end. But you can turn it. I stole the idea from home depot. Thier lumber carts are built that way. 1/2" blocks form the plywood your gonna cut will level it when its in place, and removing them will let you move the table. I figure its easier to roll a table of plants than it is to move 30 gallons of water.
    Mark and cut your plywood to go around the legs. I know it makes the pond liner a little harder to install but it adds stability. If you don't have a saber saw you can use a circular saw. Just drill holes at the corners of your marks and cut to the mark. For the center leg cut, start with your circular saw resting on the plywood with the blade up in the air. Pull the guard backand hold it up, start the saw and slowly lower it down. A little less convenient that a saber saw but it will work. Lay the plywood on top of the width braces. You won't have to fasten it down. I did.

    Flood and Drain Installation.
    The way you do this will of course be dependant on the set you buy. You will have to have a whole big enough for your set to go through. I know you won't believe it at this point, I like things neat. So I counter sank my fittings to give me a nice flat surface. Placement of the fittings will depend on the pots you are using so you need to check that out. For my fittings this is what I did.
    1 7/8" fostner bit to remove one ply of the plywood
    1 1/4" fostner bit to drill the whole the rest of the way through.
    Install pond liner. I just folded and staple it in. I used a 4' by 5' piece.
    Cut small hole in pond liner and install the flood and drain fittings, hand tight should do it.
    Install plumbing.
    I fill that 40 gallon resevoir to 35 gallons and use a 396 gph pump for this table.
    You can adjust lenght, width and height to fit your situation. I have 10' high ceiling in this flowering area and this height gives me roomfor the resevior and makes the table about 40" high, 7 1/2" deep. The pots I use end up just about level with the top of the table. Makes working with the plants much easier for this old man.
    For those of youu that are die hard hps fans you would want a 600 watter. I purchased a 4' long 8 tube T-5 flourescent light. I put two blue and 6 red spectrum bulbs in it, $240.00 including the bulbs. The jury is still out on that. I like what I see. It is cooler above that table than it is above the tables I have 400 watt hps lights. There just about a year old soo..its time to upgrade. Besides they look so cool and neat.
    Anyone reading this that wants to help me out by editing the pictures to fit the topic, please do so.

    Attached Files:

  2.  
    VictorVIcious

    VictorVIcious Well-Known Member

    As I said I'm not a computer guy. Heres some more pictures.:roll:

    Attached Files:

  3.  
    VictorVIcious

    VictorVIcious Well-Known Member

    And.. this should finish it.:hump:VV

    Attached Files:

  4.  
    FilthyFletch

    FilthyFletch Mr I Can Do That For Half

    So did you get the vinl or rubber pond liner.I built my own table like this method a couple years ago and used the rubber with felt pad under it to help stop ripping but the vinyl is cheaper and easy to patch.
  5.  
    VictorVIcious

    VictorVIcious Well-Known Member

    Thanx for reminding me, you should put some kind of mat on the bottom of this table to keep the plants from sitting in water. I had a few like they use for floors in walk-in coolers from my restuarant days. They drain well, by design. With the mat in the bottom this has not been a problem. I bought the higher grade of pond liner because it fit my space requirements not because I felt it was necessary. If the wood doesn't hold it the pond liner ain't going to. Rip's or tear's would be easy to patch with the aluminum tape I have. An astute shopper may even be able to find a pond kit that has a pond liner that fits thier space requirments on summer clearance for less than the cost of a pump. Those pump are made for continuos flow and should last a long time in a flood and drain system. Saw some yesterday at Menards. Wasn't interested because I trying to make mine all the same. That way I only need one set of replacement parts.
  6.  
    PlasmaRadio

    PlasmaRadio Well-Known Member

    Alright, I will admit that is pretty pimp. What's more, I can totally build that. Thanks.
  7.  
    VictorVIcious

    VictorVIcious Well-Known Member

    You are welcome. It does help with cost/table if you are building more than one table. Oh and you just established you creds with me, old folks are funny that way. VV
  8.  
    VictorVIcious

    VictorVIcious Well-Known Member

    This is a list of the costs associated with the table.
    Pond Liner $54.00/3 = $18.00
    1/2 Plywood $18.00/3= $6.00
    2x10's (2) = 18.00
    2x4's (6) = $15.00
    Plumbing parts $25.00
    Casters $30.00
    Pump $ 50.00
    Resevior $ 14.00
    Mat for drainage $30.00
    Total $ 206.00
    The casters aren't necessary, you could just get sliders for about $8.00. And you wouldn't have to buy the mat you could just get some plastic pvc pipe, cut it to fit in the table. THe first tables I made I used panda plastic because know one had mentioned the pond liner. It will work, just be careful when installing the flood and drain fittings, don't stretch it too much.
    I'll say it once more, I didn't build these to save money, I did it because it fits my space. VV
  9.  
    PlasmaRadio

    PlasmaRadio Well-Known Member

    I think I can build it for cheaper, but I am able to get some materials for free... Ironically, taxes are gonna kill me on this.

    Oh yeah, how long do you have your 396gph pump on to fill your table? Half hour?
  10.  
    daddychrisg

    daddychrisg Well-Known Member

    Hey VV, nice post. I like the looks of your tables. Can you please explain to me what the small black tubes running into the tops the pots are for.. I have a flood and drain table that I use for Veging plants, but, with my set up there is just a inlet and a overflow, and there is no small tubing running to the base of the plant.. What's up with that? Thanks...
  11.  
    VictorVIcious

    VictorVIcious Well-Known Member

    I posted a picture that had the original drip system. I have changed them all to flood and drain now. Tha t pump only runs for 10 minutes. I had to get a digital timer for it because most of the mechanical ones can't be set for less than 15 minutes. You could build it cheaper by leaving out the casters. The res is about the least expensive for the 40 gallon size, and you don't need all the plumbing fittings I use. VV
  12.  
    VictorVIcious

    VictorVIcious Well-Known Member

    I assumed eveyone would understand the mats for the bottom of the table, you know what you do when you assume. You make an (ass) out of (u) and(me) both. :hump: Here are pictures of what I use and how. VV
  13.  
    smokeandfly

    smokeandfly Well-Known Member

    hey mate started building my own flood and drain table used cheap thin wood with like blocks for the corners feels pretty steard tho all thats left to get done is pump and pond lining. is there anything else you have thought of using instead of mats looked on ebay today for mats and it will cost me more for the mats than the whole tabel.
  14.  
    VictorVIcious

    VictorVIcious Well-Known Member

    Yep I have. I was at Menards the other day. They carry panel that have drains on the bottom for keeping you out of the water on your basement floor. For folks that don't want to buy the whole panel put together, the have a roll of matting that is like 3' wide and 50' long. If you are making more than I table, it would cost less per table. Or you could buy some 10' lengths of 3/4" pvc pipe. Cut it in lengths to fit and place your pots on top. 10' lenghts are about $1.65 here. VV
  15.  
    potlike

    potlike Well-Known Member

    smoke: Have him buy 6 mil painter's tarp as a pond liner in 10 foot sections then just fold it over for an extra layer of protection.


    -pot
  16.  
    smokeandfly

    smokeandfly Well-Known Member

    im only building 1 table at the moment because i dont have much space so think il go with the pvc pipes thanks for the help
  17.  
    1freezy

    1freezy Well-Known Member

    Looks very nice!
  18.  
    VictorVIcious

    VictorVIcious Well-Known Member

    Thanx, welcome to the forum.VV:blsmoke:
  19.  
    VictorVIcious

    VictorVIcious Well-Known Member

    I did end up buying a roll of that floor waterproofing at Lowe's. Its 30' by 42" cuts with a pair of scissors. A lot easier to work with. VV
  20.  
    kindprincess

    kindprincess New Member

    very nice vv! i like it lots :)

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