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All the current or soon to be current laws. Whats new with weed in CO?

Discussion in 'Colorado Patients' started by dabumps, Apr 19, 2013.

  1.  
    ststephen

    ststephen Member

    This bill your referencing is a sentencing guideline bill. The penalties listed are only doled out if you are convicted first. CRS 18-18-406(3)(c) would apply in the case where an individual was growing 4 to 6 mature plants, but only allowed 3 mature plants. A crime involving 6 or fewer plants. Anyway, there is no way they are going to overturn the will of the people.
     
  2.  
    turnip brain

    turnip brain Active Member


    My turnip brain is not geared for this kind of legal language, and I find this quite confusing. With this bill it appears that the 20 and 64 provisions for individuals to grow plants has been completely repealed. WTF? Searching for commentary on the bill #, it seems this went into effect Oct 1 2013. Is this something that that happened below the general public radar and now all that grow up to 6 plants are criminals?
     
  3.  
    turnip brain

    turnip brain Active Member

    How is that cross referenced in actual written legislation?
     
  4.  
    Billy bangalot

    Billy bangalot Member

    Yeah everyone is so focused on retail, this got almost zero attention. In fact I am only on this board because a friend asked me a question about home growing with kids in the home, and my googling came up with almost nothing relevant except the grow at home sticky, which then led me to look into all of this myself.
     
  5.  
    spl1

    spl1 Well-Known Member

    Better yet any care giver or adult giving any weed to anyone under the age of 21 gets hit with a class 1 felony now. After Jan 1 2014 that is.
     
  6.  
    magdiddy

    magdiddy Member

    Stupid question here I am sure. The doc who gave me my med card, stated double the state limit on my paperwork... so 12 plants and what not.. does the state recognize this? or is this just a doctor recommendation? help would be appreciated..
     
  7.  
    ststephen

    ststephen Member

    From what I can tell, the legislature has focused on the retail laws. I searched those new laws for anything relating to home growing, there was nothing I saw. So, for now, the most formal thing we have is the recommendations of the Task Force and Amendment 64 itself.

    From what I can tell and have heard, there is little concern with home grow other than: OPENLY and PUBLICLY, LOCKED and the use of compressed gases (for making hash from butane). The Amendment itself is quite CLEAR on home grow. You can look up the definitions of OPENLY and PUBLICLY, those are verbose...

    The Task Force recommends that the General Assembly adopt statutes defining the
    following terms as they relate to the cultivation of adult-use marijuana in
    Amendment 64, Section (3)(b):
    “ENCLOSED, LOCKED SPACE”:
    ENCLOSED SPACE means: A permanent or semi-permanent area, covered from
    above and surrounded on all sides. See Section 42-4-201, C.R.S. The temporary
    opening of windows or doors or the temporary removal of wall or ceiling panels,
    does not convert the area into an unenclosed space. See Section 25-14-203, C.R.S.
    Some examples include, but are not limited to the following: a shed, a greenhouse,
    a trailer, a residence, a building, a room inside a building. An indoor area can include
    any enclosed area or portion thereof.
    LOCKED SPACE means: The area where cultivation occurs must be secured at all
    points of ingress and egress with a locking mechanism designed to limit access, such
    as a key or combination lock.
    Reasonable time shall be allowed for ingress and egress from the enclosed, locked
    space.
    If the cultivation area is located in a residence and a person under twenty -one years
    of age lives at that residence, the cultivation area within the residence must itself be
    enclosed and locked. If no person under twenty-one years of age lives at a residence
    where cultivation occurs, the external locks of the residence are sufficient to meet
    the definition of “enclosed, locked space”. If someone under twenty-one years of
    age temporarily enters such a residence, the owner must ensure that access to the
    cultivation site is reasonably restricted for the duration of that person’s presence in
    the residence.
    “GROWING IS NOT CONDUCTED OPENLY OR PUBLICLY”:
    OPENLY means: Not protected from unaided observations lawfully made from
    outside its perimeter not involving physical intrusion.
    PUBLICLY means: The area is open to general access without restriction.
     
  8.  
    ststephen

    ststephen Member

    Not stupid, you will get many correct answers, lol. Some will say extended plant counts are illegal. From what I gather, it comes down to whether the doctor will testify on your behalf to justify it. Also, I think there is a state mandated fee for extended plant counts, I think it is $150. So if you paid less than that, your doctor probably is making a suggestion, but it may not be legally defensible.
     
    magdiddy likes this.
  9.  
    spl1

    spl1 Well-Known Member

    Here this will help you with the question you asked.



    [TABLE="width: 650, align: center"]
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    back to summary
    [/SIZE][/FONT]
    [FONT=Tahoma, Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][SIZE=-1]Colorado Amendment 20[/SIZE][/FONT]
    [FONT=Tahoma, Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][SIZE=-1]Medical Use of Marijuana 2000

    [/SIZE][/FONT]Ballot Title: An amendment to the Colorado Constitution authorizing the medical use of marijuana for persons suffering from debilitating medical conditions, and, in connection therewith, establishing an affirmative defense to Colorado criminal laws for patients and their primary care-givers relating to the medical use of marijuana; establishing exceptions to Colorado criminal laws for patients and primary care-givers in lawful possession of a registry identification card for medical marijuana use and for physicians who advise patients or provide them with written documentation as to such medical marijuana use; defining "debilitating medical condition" and authorizing the state health agency to approve other medical conditions or treatments as debilitating medical conditions; requiring preservation of seized property interests that had been possessed, owned, or used in connection with a claimed medical use of marijuana and limiting forfeiture of such interests; establishing and maintaining a confidential state registry of patients receiving an identification card for the medical use of marijuana and defining eligibility for receipt of such a card and placement on the registry; restricting access to information in the registry; establishing procedures for issuance of an identification card; authorizing fees to cover administrative costs associated with the registry; specifying the form and amount of marijuana a patient may possess and restrictions on its use; setting forth additional requirements for the medical use of marijuana by patients less than eighteen years old; directing enactment of implementing legislation and criminal penalties for certain offenses; requiring the state health agency designated by the governor to make application forms available to residents of Colorado for inclusion on the registry; limiting a health insurer's liability on claims relating to the medical use of marijuana; and providing that no employer must accommodate medical use of marijuana in the workplace.
    Text of Proposed Constitutional Amendment:
    Be it Enacted by the People of the State of Colorado:

    AN AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF COLORADO, AMENDING ARTICLE XVIII, ADDING A NEW SECTION TO READ:
    Section 14. Medical use of marijuana for persons suffering from debilitating medical conditions.
    (1) As used in this section, these terms are defined as follows.

    (a) "Debilitating medical condition" means: (I) Cancer, glaucoma, positive status for human immunodeficiency virus, or acquired immune deficiency syndrome, or treatment for such conditions; (II) A chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition, or treatment for such conditions, which produces, for a specific patient, one or more of the following, and for which, in the professional opinion of the patient's physician, such condition or conditions reasonably may be alleviated by the medical use of marijuana: cachexia; severe pain; severe nausea; seizures, including those that are characteristic of epilepsy; or persistent muscle spasms, including those that are characteristic of multiple sclerosis; or (III) Any other medical condition, or treatment for such condition, approved by the state health agency, pursuant to its rule making authority or its approval of any petition submitted by a patient or physician as provided in this section. (b) "Medical use" means the acquisition, possession, production, use, or transportation of marijuana or paraphernalia related to the administration of such marijuana to address the symptoms or effects of a patient's debilitating medical condition, which may be authorized only after a diagnosis of the patient's debilitating medical condition by a physician or physicians, as provided by this section. (c) "Parent" means a custodial mother or father of a patient under the age of eighteen years, any person having custody of a patient under the age of eighteen years, or any person serving as a legal guardian for a patient under the age of eighteen years. (d) "Patient" means a person who has a debilitating medical condition. (e) "Physician" means a doctor of medicine who maintains, in good standing, a license to practice medicine issued by the state of Colorado. (f) "Primary care-giver" means a person, other than the patient and the patient's physician, who is eighteen years of age or older and has significant responsibility for managing the well-being of a patient who has a debilitating medical condition. (g) "Registry identification card" means that document, issued by the state health agency, which identifies a patient authorized to engage in the medical use of marijuana and such patient's primary care-giver, if any has been designated. (h) "State health agency" means that public health related entity of state government designated by the governor to establish and maintain a confidential registry of patients authorized to engage in the medical use of marijuana and enact rules to administer this program. (i) "Usable form of marijuana" means the seeds, leaves, buds, and flowers of the plant (genus) cannabis, and any mixture or preparation thereof, which are appropriate for medical use as provided in this section, but excludes the plant's stalks, stems, and roots. (j) "Written documentation" means a statement signed by a patient's physician or copies of the patient's pertinent medical records.(2)
    (a) Except as otherwise provided in subsections (5), (6), and (8) of this section, a patient or primary care-giver charged with a violation of the state's criminal laws related to the patient's medical use of marijuana will be deemed to have established an affirmative defense to such allegation where: (I) The patient was previously diagnosed by a physician as having a debilitating medical condition; (II) The patient was advised by his or her physician, in the context of a bona fide physician-patient relationship, that the patient might benefit from the medical use of marijuana in connection with a debilitating medical condition; and (III) The patient and his or her primary care-giver were collectively in possession of amounts of marijuana only as permitted under this section. This affirmative defense shall not exclude the assertion of any other defense where a patient or primary care-giver is charged with a violation of state law related to the patient's medical use of marijuana. (b) Effective June 1, 1999, it shall be an exception from the state's criminal laws for any patient or primary care-giver in lawful possession of a registry identification card to engage or assist in the medical use of marijuana, except as otherwise provided in subsections (5) and (8) of this section. (c) It shall be an exception from the state's criminal laws for any physician to: (I) Advise a patient whom the physician has diagnosed as having a debilitating medical condition, about the risks and benefits of medical use of marijuana or that he or she might benefit from the medical use of marijuana, provided that such advice is based upon the physician's contemporaneous assessment of the patient's medical history and current medical condition and a bona fide physician-patient relationship; or (II) Provide a patient with written documentation, based upon the physician's contemporaneous assessment of the patient's medical history and current medical condition and a bona fide physician-patient relationship, stating that the patient has a debilitating medical condition and might benefit from the medical use of marijuana. No physician shall be denied any rights or privileges for the acts authorized by this subsection. (d) Notwithstanding the foregoing provisions, no person, including a patient or primary care-giver, shall be entitled to the protection of this section for his or her acquisition, possession, manufacture, production, use, sale, distribution, dispensing, or transportation of marijuana for any use other than medical use. (e) Any property interest that is possessed, owned, or used in connection with the medical use of marijuana or acts incidental to such use, shall not be harmed, neglected, injured, or destroyed while in the possession of state or local law enforcement officials where such property has been seized in connection with the claimed medical use of marijuana. Any such property interest shall not be forfeited under any provision of state law providing for the forfeiture of property other than as a sentence imposed after conviction of a criminal offense or entry of a plea of guilty to such offense. Marijuana and paraphernalia seized by state or local law enforcement officials from a patient or primary care-giver in connection with the claimed medical use of marijuana shall be returned immediately upon the determination of the district attorney or his or her designee that the patient or primary care-giver is entitled to the protection contained in this section as may be evidenced, for example, by a decision not to prosecute, the dismissal of charges, or acquittal.(3) The state health agency shall create and maintain a confidential registry of patients who have applied for and are entitled to receive a registry identification card according to the criteria set forth in this subsection, effective June 1, 1999.
    (a) No person shall be permitted to gain access to any information about patients in the state health agency's confidential registry, or any information otherwise maintained by the state health agency about physicians and primary care-givers, except for authorized employees of the state health agency in the course of their official duties and authorized employees of state or local law enforcement agencies which have stopped or arrested a person who claims to be engaged in the medical use of marijuana and in possession of a registry identification card or its functional equivalent, pursuant to paragraph (e) of this subsection (3). Authorized employees of state or local law enforcement agencies shall be granted access to the information contained within the state health agency's confidential registry only for the purpose of verifying that an individual who has presented a registry identification card to a state or local law enforcement official is lawfully in possession of such card. (b) In order to be placed on the state's confidential registry for the medical use of marijuana, a patient must reside in Colorado and submit the completed application form adopted by the state health agency, including the following information, to the state health agency: (I) The original or a copy of written documentation stating that the patient has been diagnosed with a debilitating medical condition and the physician's conclusion that the patient might benefit from the medical use of marijuana; (II) The name, address, date of birth, and social security number of the patient; (III) The name, address, and telephone number of the patient's physician; and (IV) The name and address of the patient's primary care-giver, if one is designated at the time of application. (c) Within thirty days of receiving the information referred to in subparagraphs (3)(b)(I)-(IV), the state health agency shall verify medical information contained in the patient's written documentation. The agency shall notify the applicant that his or her application for a registry identification card has been denied if the agency's review of such documentation discloses that: the information required pursuant to paragraph (3)(b) of this section has not been provided or has been falsified; the documentation fails to state that the patient has a debilitating medical condition specified in this section or by state health agency rule; or the physician does not have a license to practice medicine issued by the state of Colorado. Otherwise, not more than five days after verifying such information, the state health agency shall issue one serially numbered registry identification card to the patient, stating: (I) The patient's name, address, date of birth, and social security number; (II) That the patient's name has been certified to the state health agency as a person who has a debilitating medical condition, whereby the patient may address such condition with the medical use of marijuana; (III) The date of issuance of the registry identification card and the date of expiration of such card, which shall be one year from the date of issuance; and (IV) The name and address of the patient's primary care-giver, if any is designated at the time of application. (d) Except for patients applying pursuant to subsection (6) of this section, where the state health agency, within thirty-five days of receipt of an application, fails to issue a registry identification card or fails to issue verbal or written notice of denial of such application, the patient's application for such card will be deemed to have been approved. Receipt shall be deemed to have occurred upon delivery to the state health agency, or deposit in the United States mails. Notwithstanding the foregoing, no application shall be deemed received prior to June 1, 1999. A patient who is questioned by any state or local law enforcement official about his or her medical use of marijuana shall provide a copy of the application submitted to the state health agency, including the written documentation and proof of the date of mailing or other transmission of the written documentation for delivery to the state health agency, which shall be accorded the same legal effect as a registry identification card, until such time as the patient receives notice that the application has been denied. (e) A patient whose application has been denied by the state health agency may not reapply during the six months following the date of the denial and may not use an application for a registry identification card as provided in paragraph (3)(d) of this section. The denial of a registry identification card shall be considered a final agency action. Only the patient whose application has been denied shall have standing to contest the agency action. (f) When there has been a change in the name, address, physician, or primary care-giver of patient who has qualified for a registry identification card, that patient must notify the state health agency of any such change within ten days. A patient who has not designated a primary care-giver at the time of application to the state health agency may do so in writing at any time during the effective period of the registry identification card, and the primary care-giver may act in this capacity after such designation. To maintain an effective registry identification card, a patient must annually resubmit, at least thirty days prior to the expiration date stated on the registry identification card, updated written documentation to the state health agency, as well as the name and address of the patient's primary care-giver, if any is designated at such time. (g) Authorized employees of state or local law enforcement agencies shall immediately notify the state health agency when any person in possession of a registry identification card has been determined by a court of law to have willfully violated the provisions of this section or its implementing legislation, or has pled guilty to such offense. (h) A patient who no longer has a debilitating medical condition shall return his or her registry identification card to the state health agency within twenty-four hours of receiving such diagnosis by his or her physician. (i) The state health agency may determine and levy reasonable fees to pay for any direct or indirect administrative costs associated with its role in this program.(4)
    (a) A patient may engage in the medical use of marijuana, with no more marijuana than is medically necessary to address a debilitating medical condition. A patient's medical use of marijuana, within the following limits, is lawful:(I) No more than two ounces of a usable form of marijuana; and (II) No more than six marijuana plants, with three or fewer being mature, flowering plants that are producing a usable form of marijuana. (b) For quantities of marijuana in excess of these amounts, a patient or his or her primary care-giver may raise as an affirmative defense to charges of violation of state law that such greater amounts were medically necessary to address the patient's debilitating medical condition.(5)
    (a) No patient shall:(I) Engage in the medical use of marijuana in a way that endangers the health or well-being of any person; or (II) Engage in the medical use of marijuana in plain view of, or in a place open to, the general public. (b) In addition to any other penalties provided by law, the state health agency shall revoke for a period of one year the registry identification card of any patient found to have willfully violated the provisions of this section or the implementing legislation adopted by the general assembly.(6) Notwithstanding paragraphs (2)(a) and (3)(d) of this section, no patient under eighteen years of age shall engage in the medical use of marijuana unless:
    (a) Two physicians have diagnosed the patient as having a debilitating medical condition; (b) One of the physicians referred to in paragraph (6)(a) has explained the possible risks and benefits of medical use of marijuana to the patient and each of the patient's parents residing in Colorado; (c) The physicians referred to in paragraph (6)(b) has provided the patient with the written documentation, specified in subparagraph (3)(b)(I); (d) Each of the patient's parents residing in Colorado consent in writing to the state health agency to permit the patient to engage in the medical use of marijuana; (e) A parent residing in Colorado consents in writing to serve as a patient's primary care-giver; (f) A parent serving as a primary care-giver completes and submits an application for a registry identification card as provided in subparagraph (3)(b) of this section and the written consents referred to in paragraph (6)(d) to the state health agency; (g) The state health agency approves the patient's application and transmits the patient's registry identification card to the parent designated as a primary care-giver; (h) The patient and primary care-giver collectively possess amounts of marijuana no greater than those specified in subparagraph (4)(a)(I) and (II); and (i) The primary care-giver controls the acquisition of such marijuana and the dosage and frequency of its use by the patient.(7) Not later than March 1, 1999, the governor shall designate, by executive order, the state health agency as defined in paragraph (1)(g) of this section.
    (8) Not later than April 30, 1999, the General Assembly shall define such terms and enact such legislation as may be necessary for implementation of this section, as well as determine and enact
    (a) Fraudulent representation of a medical condition by a patient to a physician, state health agency, or state or local law enforcement official for the purpose of falsely obtaining a registry identification card or avoiding arrest and prosecution; (b) Fraudulent use or theft of any person's registry identification card to acquire, possess, produce, use, sell, distribute, or transport marijuana, including but not limited to cards that are required to be returned where patients are no longer diagnosed as having a debilitating medical condition; (c) Fraudulent production or counterfeiting of, or tampering with, one or more registry identification cards; or (d) Breach of confidentiality of information provided to or by the state health agency.(9) Not later than June 1, 1999, the state health agency shall develop and make available to residents of Colorado an application form for persons seeking to be listed on the confidential registry of patients. By such date, the state health agency shall also enact rules of administration, including but not limited to rules governing the establishment and confidentiality of the registry, the verification of medical information, the issuance and form of registry identification cards, communications with law enforcement officials about registry identification cards that have been suspended where a patient is no longer diagnosed as having a debilitating medical condition, and the manner in which the agency may consider adding debilitating medical conditions to the list provided in this section. Beginning June 1, 1999, the state health agency shall accept physician or patient initiated petitions to add debilitating medical conditions to the list provided in this section and, after such hearing as the state health agency deems appropriate, shall approve or deny such petitions within one hundred eighty days of submission. The decision to approve or deny a petition shall be considered a final agency action.
    (10)
    (a) No governmental, private, or any other health insurance provider shall be required to be liable for any claim for reimbursement for the medical use of marijuana. (b) Nothing in this section shall require any employer to accommodate the medical use of marijuana in any work place.
    (11) Unless otherwise provided by this section, all provisions of this section shall become effective upon official declaration of the vote hereon by proclamation of the governor, pursuant to article V, section (1)(4), and shall apply to acts or offenses committed on or after that date.
    [/TD]
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  10.  
    ststephen

    ststephen Member

    FYI: The City of Denver is trying to limit the number of plants allowed Under A20 / A64 via zoning laws. The new amendment would limit you to 12 plants, REGARDLESS.

    Section 5. Section 11.8.4.1 of the DZC is amended to allow forthe growing of 6 marijuana plants per adult resident of a dwelling unit as well as six plants per patient registry card holder, provided no more than 12 plants may be grown per dwelling unit.

    12 plants? Really? More sour grapes from the prohibitionists.

    http://www.denvergov.org/sirepub/cache/2/1zyrkjzm4ul5zbf2z1d5tafh/48497312012013050124843.PDF
     
  11.  
    Alchemystik

    Alchemystik New Member

    do you know when this will be accepted / rejected?
     
  12.  
    ststephen

    ststephen Member

  13.  
    magdiddy

    magdiddy Member

    what I dont understand is that on the form i sent in to the state to get my license it had my increased plant count on it. the state approved it and gave me the license so doesnt that mean that i am good?
     
  14.  
    ststephen

    ststephen Member

    Well, not in the city of Denver. Currently, there IS A 12 PLANT LIMIT on medical as well via zoning law, the same law we are looking to clean up. Extended plant counts come down to whether or not your doctor will go to court to defend it or not, as I understand. I'm no lawyer,though. Just the wisdom I've heard.

    WE NEED SPEAKERS AT Denver City Council, CITY and County Building, 1437 Bannock St, Denver, CO 80202. Tuesday December 10th. Sign up to speak in Room 391 between 9:30 and 10:15. You get 2 minutes, make it good! STOP THE PER DWELLING PLANT LIMIT!!!
     
    BudgetGrower87 likes this.
  15.  
    William Wonder

    William Wonder Active Member

    I guess I'm a little confused about the 70/30 rule. If shops can purchase 30% of the weed they can sell, who must they buy from? Can a caregiver sell any excess he might have if a patient's not buying a lot? Also, does anyone know if a felon caught with 8 plants in another state is eligible to even work in a shop or for a shop. I know they can't own a pot center, however it does appear they can be caregiver. Colorado looks like a very difficult place to break even, considering the very low oz prices in the shops. No one is going to get rich moving to CO and starting a pot shop. The costs and taxes are to high and the retail prices to low. Also CO has a lot of pros and it's going to be difficult for most to even compete. You're going have to be at least as good as Subcool with even better genetics to even have a shot. Does that sound about right?
     
  16.  
    blackforest

    blackforest Well-Known Member

    Not sure on the 70/30, but yes, I believe you are right that nobody is going to get rich opening a pot shop. Supply and demand will dictate the price in the new retail shops, and I'm interested in what the prices will really be. Since demand is going to increase exponentially I would imagine that the prices are going to go up.....a lot at first until supply can catch up.

    Like me, I believe many that live here and like to partake will simply grow their own. There are some great genetics out there and I'm sure that the quality will only increase with time. If we can grow top genetics at home at a fraction of the price, then many will do just that.

    I have a feeling that CO's biggest export is going to change as well. If prices are 2x out of state, then that's where they will sell any excess.
     
  17.  
    ststephen

    ststephen Member

    Working at one of the dispensaries requires an approval process that is quite extensive and intrusive. I don't think your history would allow it. Being a caregiver is a possibility, but good luck finding patients, unless you have friends and family to help out there.

    While it is true that prices will eventually go down, I expect an initial spike. As the retail grows hit harvest and the supply and demand get equalized, prices will drop. Home growers will still have the BEST WEED, but you could get some "commercial" pretty cheap. LOL

    I expect home growing will become like home brewing, done by those who enjoy it, not because it will save you money. My home brew beer blew away any commercial beer, and so does my bud. Home growers will have the tasty nugs....
     
  18.  
    William Wonder

    William Wonder Active Member

    ^Fuck Colorado. Sounds like a hellhole with the government playing the mafia, trying to extract every dollar. How much could a caregiver charge when the retail prices are $175 an oz? Then you're limited to 12 plants in a home. Who can afford to rent a space to provide just 5 people? A total loss all the way around. They even ding you for defaulted student loans. The mafia isn't even this greedy. Colorado is going to devope a reputation for exporting to illegal states is all that's going to happen. Don't even attempt to drive a car with rado plates out of the state. The only ones they want making money are the big dollar investors paying big taxes. Not much of a step up over prohibition. An industry run by cops and tax collectors. Oregon and Washington are better choices it looks like.
     
    spl1 likes this.
  19.  
    fluffygrrrl

    fluffygrrrl Well-Known Member

    I totallly disagree with you. You drank the koolaid that unions are the problem, billionaires paid a lot of money drilling that into our heads in order to get people to believe that so we now accept lower wages, and have such a huge divide between mega rich and the rest of us. A union will PROTECT us from CRONY CAPITALISM.

    I live in Michigan another med state with similar laws, and the our state republican legislature has handed over our growing to big pharma. The second the feds declassify pot, prairie plant systems will be growing weed for our state and SELLIING IRRADIATED WEED in our pharmacies at ridiculous prices i'm sure. Our former republian speaker of the house is now the main lobbiest for that Canadian company, (who also has the contract to provide for Canada...little growers there have to turn in their grow equipment this month).. Before this, the republicans have been fighting our med laws and creating laws to not allow dispensaries in our state. They found a way to profit off of the cannabis, and now they are all for it. Funny how they passed that law in record time for ANY law, yet haven't passed the laws that allow us to make hash oil, or open a dispensary.

    In order to compete with big business, the little guy with a small business has no voice. We have lots of people that go individually to talk with them, but without a lobbyist, their dont listen. but a union is what is really needed to have the MONEY and organization needed to get things done. money talks in politics, sorry to say.
     
  20.  
    Dameon

    Dameon Well-Known Member

    the 70/30 law does apply. Dispensaries get the 30% from trades thru edible companies, hash makers etc. However, ANY hobby grower can sell to a dispensary thru a legal channel. I knew a lawyer who did this and charged a fee. All legit.
     

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