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5000k or 3000k lights?

Discussion in 'LED and other Lighting' started by kdt15, Feb 6, 2018.

  1.  
    kdt15

    kdt15 Member

    I recall some discussion about these color temps for lights and one wsas better than the other for veg and for flower. Does anyone have experience or knowledge on which one goes to which?

    also, would making my own light set up with a mixture of thes 5000k and 3000k together be a bad idea for just doing a "set and forget" and use it for both flower and veg, or is it better to specialize in each and swap plants to a different light source when the time is right?
     
  2.  
    Humple

    Humple Well-Known Member

    I'm a big fan of one spectrum from start to finish. Go 3500k or 3000k. They veg perfectly fine and flower amazingly.
     
    mr. childs and Chip Green like this.
  3.  
    verticalgrow

    verticalgrow Well-Known Member

    :leaf: 90 CRI :eyesmoke:
     
    hybridway2 likes this.
  4.  
    kdt15

    kdt15 Member

    what does this mean?
     
  5.  
    verticalgrow

    verticalgrow Well-Known Member

  6.  
    kdt15

    kdt15 Member

  7.  
    verticalgrow

    verticalgrow Well-Known Member

  8.  
    mahiluana

    mahiluana Well-Known Member

    here you can play around with different light temps. to see what happens with PAR, PPFD, DLI.....

    http://dev.edman007.com/~edman007/pub/par-dli-cal.html

    i like 4000K for veg and add a 10-15% power of 2000K during bloom
     
  9.  
    Joint Monster

    Joint Monster Well-Known Member

    I just finished a build myself. 18x 3K and 6x 5K.
    Check out my thread you may find some useful information. GBAuto and others helped me out a lot! :)
    http://www.rollitup.org/t/please-help-plan-mini-rdwc-room-lighting-ventillation.952330/

    I did a ratio of 3:1 (3000K:5000k) .

    When you look at sites selling cob led's you will usually notice three measurements/units. i.e.; A Vero29Se Cob would be labelled something like - 3000k 80CRI D. (where there is 70,80,90 CRI. and a few different letter models.)
    I believe D stands for 37.7V , there are also fifty-something and seventy-something volt model Cobs.
    Consider all three variables when choosing your setup.
     
    Jimdamick likes this.
  10.  
    VegasWinner

    VegasWinner Well-Known Member

    I use both for both
     
    Jimdamick likes this.
  11.  
    JavaCo

    JavaCo Well-Known Member

    This is both 5000k and 3000k 6 of each Gen 5 vero 18's day 33 of flower. 0202181200.jpg
     
  12.  
    puffenuff

    puffenuff Well-Known Member

    Mix them homie
     
    Jimdamick and hybridway2 like this.
  13.  
    nfhiggs

    nfhiggs Well-Known Member

    IMO, don't bother. When you mix two CCT's you end up with an average of the two. Stephen from HLG has demonstrated this with a spectrometer. Equal amounts of 5000K and 3000K light will just give you approximately 4000K. light. If you mix three to one as suggested above you end up with ~3500K. May as well just use 4000K or 3500K.
     
    Cold$moke, GBAUTO and hybridway2 like this.
  14.  
    kdt15

    kdt15 Member

    have you found it to be better, the 3 to 1 ratio, than just normal builds?
     
  15.  
    kdt15

    kdt15 Member

    do you have a link to this experiment? would love to see what he did
     
  16.  
    Olive Drab Green

    Olive Drab Green Well-Known Member

    3500k.
     
    Jimdamick likes this.
  17.  
    kdt15

    kdt15 Member

    also can you explain what the K means? i know its kelvin but thats a value for temperature based off celsius linearly. no lights are running at 3000k let alone 5000k! everything would burn up!

    for spectrum graphs, im not really sure how to read them. i know 400-700nm is the visible light wavelengths for x axis, but wtf are the values of 0-1 for y axis? cant superimpose 2 graphs if we cant tell what the graph axis is :P
     
  18.  
    kdt15

    kdt15 Member

    care to share reasoning?
     
  19.  
    mahiluana

    mahiluana Well-Known Member

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_temperature

    To the extent that a hot surface emits thermal radiation but is not an ideal black-body radiator, the color temperature of the light is not the actual temperature of the surface. An incandescent lamp's light is thermal radiation, and the bulb approximates an ideal black-body radiator, so its color temperature is essentially the temperature of the filament. Thus a relatively low temperature emits a dull red and a high temperature emits the almost white of the traditional incandescent light bulb. Metal workers are able to judge the temperature of hot metals by their color, from dark red to orange-white and then white (see red heat).
    Many other light sources, such as fluorescent lamps, or LEDs (light emitting diodes) emit light primarily by processes other than thermal radiation. This means that the emitted radiation does not follow the form of a black-body spectrum. These sources are assigned what is known as a correlated color temperature (CCT). CCT is the color temperature of a black-body radiator which to human color perception most closely matches the light from the lamp. Because such an approximation is not required for incandescent light, the CCT for an incandescent light is simply its unadjusted temperature, derived from comparison to a black-body radiator.
     
  20.  
    Joint Monster

    Joint Monster Well-Known Member

    I liked the way they fit in my build (the positioning of the various cobs). There was however some research and comparable's I went through to pick that ratio of cobs.... I just don't have the links on hand (some threads, some builds, some informational websites)... Many hours were spent putting it all together. With that said this was a first build so take my advice as you wish.
     

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